Summer Sessions | Courses | Anthropology

Anthropology

The Anthropology Department is the oldest department of anthropology in the United States. The summer course offerings focus on various socio-cultural aspects of anthropology, taking into consideration cross-cultural interpretation, global socio-political concepts, and a markedly interdisciplinary approach.

The courses on this page reflect Summer 2018 offerings. 

 

Courses
Expand All
Anthropology of Violence
ANTH S3722D 3 points.

This course will explore contemporary anthropological approaches to the issue of violence with an exploration of three particular themes. Our main focus will be on the idea of representation, ethnographically and theoretically, of the concept of violence. First, we will look at how violence has been situated as an object of study within anthropology, as a theoretical concept as well as in practice. We will then look at the issue of terrorism and how anthropology as a discipline contributes to understanding this particular form of violence. Finally, we will consider gender-based violence with close attention to the colonial/post-colonial settings where Islam is a salient factor. Gender based violence is one of the main forces producing and reproducing gender inequality. We will pay particular attention to the concept of the "Muslim woman" in both the colonial and colonized imagination.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3722 001/74206 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Ellen Marakowitz 3 Open
Anti-Colonialism
ANTH S3921D 3 points.

The age of colonialism, so it seems, is long over. Decolonization has resulted in the emergence of postcolonial polities and societies that are now, in many instances, two generations old. But is it clear that the problem of colonialism has disappeared? Almost everywhere in the postcolonial world the project of building independent polities, economies and societies have faltered, sometimes run aground. Indeed, one might say that the anti-colonial dream of emancipation has evaporated. Through a careful exploration of the conceptual argument and rhetorical style of five central anti-colonial texts—C.L.R. James’ The Black Jacobins, Mahatma Gandhi’s Hind Swaraj, Aimé Cesairé’s Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi’s Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth—this course aims to inquire into the image of colonialism as a structure of dominant power, and the image of its anticipated aftermaths: What were the perceived ill-effects of colonial power? What did colonialism do to the colonized that required rectification? In what ways did the critique of colonial power (the identification of what was wrong with it) shape the longing for its anti-colonial overcoming?

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3921 001/13444 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
David Scott 3 Open
The Interpretation of Culture
ANTH S1002D 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1002 001/14258 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Maxine Weisgrau 3 Open
Anthropology of the Body
ANTH S3965Q 3 points.

The productive unease in critical theory occasioned by the body as the ambivalent ground of both subjugation and emancipatory transformation has resulted in debates over the link between corporeality and symbolic representations, discourse formations and disciplinary practices and ultimately, between nature and its others: culture, history, and society. This course promises to raise discussion to a level where political issues concerning the body can be reevaluated through a rigorous rethinking of the radical shifts in the status of the body as both subject and object of economic, technological, and cultural processes under globalized capital. Approaching ethnographic and historical materials concerning violence and healing, discipline and labor, machinery and embodiment, affects and resistance in terms of the ontological claims they presuppose or make in relation to philosophies of the body, this course has the distinctive aim of demonstrating how histories of the body are co-implicated with histories of gender, race, class, sexuality, (post)coloniality, capital, science and technology, and mass mediation. Contesting the opposition between objectivism and subjectivism, it will pose a broader set of questions concerning power, agency, and language in order to elaborate a politics of corporeality.      

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3965 001/77002 Tu Th 12:00p - 3:10p
402 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Steven Alley 3 Open
The Anthropology of Islam
ANTH S3009Q 3 points.

This course centers on the constantly changing ambivalent everyday lived realities, experiences, interpretations as well as the multiple meanings of Islam and focuses less on the study of Islam as a discursive tradition. Furthermore, the course challenges stereotypes of Islam, and of people who one way or another can be called Muslims; most often perceived as a homogenous category through which all Muslim societies are imagined. The course is divided into six parts. The first part introduces the idea of “anthropology of Islam” through different readings in anthropology and various, experiences, practices, dimensions of Islam as a relationship between humans and God. In the second part, the focus is to listen to Islam and connect the different sonic bodies of Islam to power and politics. The third part interrogates preconceived ideas about Islam, gender, feminism, and agency. The fourth part studies Islam, body, sexuality and eroticism. The fifth part is concerned with Islam, youth culture, identity, belonging and rebellion. The last part critically analyzes Islam, modernity, orientalism, post-colonialism and not least today’s fear and notion of imagined enemies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3009 001/61671 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Maria Malmstrom 3 Open
The Interpretation of Culture
ANTH S1002Q 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1002 002/82596 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Neil Savishinsky 3 Open
Women and Gender in South Asia
ANTH S4187Q 3 points.

This course is an ethnographic and historical introduction to the construction of gender and feminist theory in the South Asian context. We will focus on textual and visual material, primarily ethnographies and films, to provide a critique of normative representations of the "South Asian woman". These readings will be used to reveal the complex social and historical configurations that institute and obscure gendered experiences and representations within the colonial imagination and their colonized others. A significant motif of this course will be to develop alternative ways of knowing and understanding gender construction, sexual relations, and community formation in South Asia.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 4187 001/21953 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Sonia Ahsan 3 Open