Summer Sessions | Courses | Film

Film

Film 

We’ve established a simple application process for courses offered by the School of the Arts this summer, including courses in Film. Please visit Arts in the Summer with the School of the Arts for details.

The courses on this page reflect Summer 2018 offerings. 

 

Courses
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Screenwriting I: Introduction to Screenwriting
FILM S4037D 3 points.

Modern feature-length screenplays demand a specific architecture. In this class students will enter with an idea for a film, and during the first eight sessions build a coherent treatment; that is, a summary of the events and major emotional arcs of the film's three acts. In the final four sessions students will begin and complete the first act of their feature-length screenplay.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4037 001/66493 M W 10:00a - 1:00p
512 DODGE BUILDING
Loren-Paul Caplin 3 Open
Television Writing Intensive- Non Credit
FILM S0431D 0 points.

International Students are not eligible for this course, as it does not provide academic credit. The TV Writing Intensive is a six-week, concentrated and encompassing introduction into the field of television writing designed to prepare students to join the professional worlds of half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas across network, cable and digital platforms. In an interconnected program consisting of two intensive writing workshops and a lecture series with guest writers and producers, students gain the knowledge and authority to explore, examine and create the kind of groundbreaking work that is taking over television here and around the world. Participants in The Television Writing Intensive learn about half-hour comedy and one-hour drama by writing and developing spec scripts and original pilots.  A spec script is a teleplay for an existing show where the writer brings original stories to existing characters.  A pilot is a script written for an original series that the writer creates. This intensive course meets 15 hours per week. On Mondays and Wednesdays students will attend the writing courses outlined above. Thursday evenings students will attend seminars with professors and other industry professionals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 0431 001/24367 M W 10:00a - 1:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
M W 2:00p - 5:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
Th 7:00p - 10:00p
511 DODGE BUILDING
Joseph Cacaci 0 Open
The Television Writing Intensive
FILM S3040D 6 points.

The TV Writing Intensive is a six-week, concentrated and encompassing introduction into the field of television writing designed to prepare students to join the professional worlds of half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas across network, cable and digital platforms. In an interconnected program consisting of two intensive writing workshops and a lecture series with guest writers and producers, students gain the knowledge and authority to explore, examine and create the kind of groundbreaking work that is taking over television here and around the world. Participants in The Television Writing Intensive learn about half-hour comedy and one-hour drama by writing and developing spec scripts and original pilots.  A spec script is a teleplay for an existing show where the writer brings original stories to existing characters.  A pilot is a script written for an original series that the writer creates. This intensive course meets 15 hours per week. On Mondays and Wednesdays students will attend the writing courses outlined above.  Thursday evenings students will attend seminars with professors and other industry professionals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3040 001/21904 M W 10:00a - 1:00p
508 DODGE BUILDING
M W 2:00p - 5:00p
508 DODGE BUILDING
Th 7:00p - 10:00p
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Joseph Cacaci 6 Open
World Cinema: Mexico
FILM S2295D 3 points.

The global success of film directors Alejandro González Iñárritu, Alfonso Cuarón, and Guillermo del Toro has attracted much attention to the New Mexican Cinema. Yet this «Nuevo cine mexicano» cannot be understood without knowing the traditions of Mexico’s intricate film history. This course explores the numerous tendencies of Mexican cinema through the analysis of its most representative genres, features, and directors since the so called Golden Age (1938-1957). An in-depth analysis of films such as Emilio Fernández’s María Candelaria (1943), Luis Buñuel’s Los olvidados (1950), Jomi García Ascot’s On the Empty Balcony (1962), Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Mole (1970), and Arturo Ripstein's Deep Crimson (1996) will contribute to define the characteristics of the most relevant «national» genres – from 1940s melodramas to 1970s acid Westerns and 1990s crime films. The study of the New Mexican Cinema of Iñárritu (Amores perros, 2000), Cuarón (Y tu mamá también, 2001), and del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, 2006) will also comprise an examination of the complex relationship between the US and Mexican film industries, as well as a critique of the very notion of «national identity» in today’s globalized world. We will also analyze new tendencies in commercial, experimental, and documentary Mexican films – including Carlos Reygadas' Silent Light (2007) and Pedro González Rubio's Alamar (2009). CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2295 001/65246 Tu Th 9:00a - 1:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
Breixo Viejo Vinas 3 Limited Availability
Animation Film History
FILM S4220Q 3 points.

From Émile Cohl to the Fleischer brothers, and from Studio Ghibli to Bob’s Burgers, this course will explore the histories, styles, and theories of animation film. We will start by tackling what constitutes “animation” and how this format has changed into “animation film,” over the course of several centuries, with roots in shadow theatre, magic, and a slew of optical media that rose to the occasion in the 19th century - from thaumatrope to zoetrope and beyond. We will look at the different techniques, styles, and media that artists experimented with in the early-20th century and that came to stick for the decades to come. This will provide you with a primer, working knowledge of the jargon, and will help you recognize cut-outs, cel animation, rotoscoping, stop-motion, CGI, and much more. From the Fleischer brothers to the Warner brothers and Walt Disney, we will explore the history of America’s animated golden age in the 1930s and 1940s. In Europe and the U.S.S.R., we will delve into the rich traditions of puppet animation from Wladyslaw Starewicz to Jan Svankmajer and from Aardman to the Quay brothers. You will get to know the cultural specifics of Japanese animation (or “anime”) and we will track its history with a postwar focus on Osamu Tezuka, Satoshi Kon, Mamoru Oshii, Studio Ghibli directors, and Makoto Shinkai. In our final week, we will look at the 1980s rise and ever growing popularity of the animated sitcom, from The Flintstones to The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist to BoJack Horseman. We will additionally consider topics such as the interplay between live action and animation, the exchange between Japanese and American traditions, and the evolution of the medium into an art of its own. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4220 001/28346 Tu Th 9:00a - 1:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
Vito Adriaensens 3 Open
Producing the Low Budget Film
FILM S3833Q 3 points.

This practical lab focuses on the fundamental aspects of development, planning and preparation for low budget films. While using a short film script as their own case study – students will learn pitching, development, script breakdown, scheduling, budgeting and fundraising. Discussion of legal issues, location scouting, deliverables, marketing, distribution and film festival strategy will allow students to move forward with their own projects after completing the class. Using weekly assignments, in-class presentations and textbook readings to reinforce each class discussion topic, students will complete the class having created a final prep/production binder for their project, which includes the script breakdown, production schedule, line item budget, financing/fundraising plan and film festival strategy for their chosen script. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3833 001/12993 Tu Th 10:00a - 1:00p
508 DODGE BUILDING
Veronica Nickel 3 Closed
Discovering French Cinema
FILM OC4200 3 points.

Cinema is one of the few art forms to actually have a birthday: December 28, 1895, the night when the Lumière brothers organized the first public screening of their films in Paris. Since that time, France has been one of the essential drivers of film as art and industry: it was the first cinema to be widely exported, and the first to recognize cinema as a legitimate form of personal expression. This class will trace the development of the cinema in France from its earliest days up until its most recent developments, analyzing individual works both in terms of their use of film style and technique as well their connection to changing social and political conditions in France. Works by Jean Vigo, Jean Renoir, Jean-Luc Godard and Claire Denis, among others will be screened.


Please note: This course is NOT open to summer visiting students.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4200 001/17066 Richard Pena 3 Open