Summer Sessions | Courses | Greek

Greek

Departmental Website: classics.columbia.edu

The courses on this page reflect Summer 2018 offerings. 

 

Courses
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Advanced Russian, I
RUSS S4333H 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee

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Curriculum evolves according to needs and interests of the students. Emphasis on conversation and composition, reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes; oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4333 001/75821 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 1:00p
406 HAMILTON HALL
Alla Smyslova 4 Open
Intermediate Russian, I
RUSS S2101H 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee


Builds upon skills acquired at introductory level. Emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and grammar review. Taken with RUSS S2102R, equivalent to full-year intermediate course.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2101 001/62096 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 1:00p
609 HAMILTON HALL
Alexey Pekov 4 Open
Intermediate Russian, I
RUSS S1201H 4 points.

Builds upon skills acquired at introductory level. Emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and grammar review. Taken with RUSS S1202R, equivalent to full-year intermediate course.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Advanced Russian, II
RUSS S4334R 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee

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Continuation of RUSS S4333H.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 4334 001/66910 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 1:00p
707 HAMILTON HALL
Vasily Lvov 4 Open
Beginning Russian, II
RUSS S1102R 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee

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Continuation of RUSS S1101H.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1102 001/68126 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 1:00p
315 HAMILTON HALL
Michael Ossorgin 4 Open
Intermediate Russian, II
RUSS S2102R 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee


Continuation of RUSS S2101H.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 2102 001/78029 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 1:00p
609 HAMILTON HALL
Serhii Tereshchenko 4 Open
Intermediate Russian, II
RUSS S1202R 4 points.

Continuation of RUSS S1201H.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Beginning Russian, I
RUSS S1101F 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee

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Designed to develop all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Taken with RUSS S1102R, equivalent to full-year elementary course.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RUSS 1101 001/77037 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 1:00p
316 HAMILTON HALL
Mie Mortensen 4 Open
First Year Arabic, II
MDES S1211J 5 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $10.00 = Materials Fee


The continuation of S1210.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1211 001/12190 M Tu W Th F 9:00a - 1:00p
101 KNOX HALL
Ouijdane Absi 5 Open
Second Year Arabic, II.
MDES S1215J 5 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $10.00 = Materials Fee


A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing in Arabic. Designed to increase vocabulary and extend facility with grammatical forms. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities will develop beyond the range of a simple sentence to that of more complex, lengthier discourse. Students begin to feel confident conversing with native speakers.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1215 001/21101 M Tu W Th F 9:00a - 1:00p
114 KNOX HALL
Rym Bettaieb 5 Open
Third Year Arabic, II
MDES S4211J 5 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $10.00 = Materials Fee


The continuation of S4210, above.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4211 001/63227 M Tu W Th F 9:00a - 1:00p
112 KNOX HALL
Reem Faraj 5 Open
First Year Arabic, I
MDES S1210G 5 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $10.00 = Materials Fee


An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. Designed to develop the skills necessary for reading and speaking in this country or in the Middle East. Integrates the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing with an introduction to Arabic culture. Enrollment priority will be given to students that are taking MDES S1211 in Summer Session 2. If you are only taking MDES S1210 you need to contact tb46@columbia.edu for permission.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1210 001/64443 M Tu W Th F 9:00a - 1:00p
104 KNOX HALL
Ouijdane Absi 5 Open
Second Year Arabic, I
MDES S1214G 5 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $10.00 = Materials Fee


A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing in Arabic. Designed to increase vocabulary and extend facility with grammatical forms. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities will develop beyond the range of a simple sentence to that of more complex, lengthier discourse. Students begin to feel confident conversing with native speakers.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 1214 001/28797 M Tu W Th F 9:00a - 1:00p
C01 KNOX HALL
Rym Bettaieb 5 Open
Third Year Arabic I
MDES S4210G 5 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $10.00 = Materials Fee


Improvement of writing and speaking skills through compositions, class discussions, and presentations in Arabic on topics such as areas and cultures of the Middle East; classical and modern Arabic literature; and current, authentic materials available from Middle Eastern sources. Review of grammatical and syntactic rules as needed.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MDES 4210 001/72138 M Tu W Th F 9:00a - 1:00p
116 KNOX HALL
Reem Faraj 5 Open
Foundations of Fundraising and Development
FUND S4370E 3 points.

A comprehensive introduction to basic terminology and concepts in the field of fundraising. Survey of various fundraising vehicles and strategies: balancing individual donor and institutional needs; building fruitful relationships; the process of solicitation; the psychological dynamics of asking for money; the financial and personal realities involved. Analysis of and instruction in writing mission statements, grant proposals, acknowledgement letters, and campaign appeal materials, the basic tools of the fundraiser. Analysis of case studies and participation in role-playing exercises.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Calculus, I
MATH S1101X 3 points.

Functions, limits, derivatives, introduction to integrals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1101 003/66076 M W 4:30p - 6:05p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Alexander Casti 3 Open
General Chemistry II (Lecture)
CHEM S1404X 4 points.

Topics include gases, kinetic theory of gases, states of matter: liquids and solids, chemical equilibria, applications of equilibria, acids and bases, chemical thermodynamics, energy, enthalpy, entropy, free energy, periodic properties, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. The order of presentation of topics may differ from the order presented here, and from year to year. This course is the continuation of CHEM UN1403 General Chemistry I Lecture. This course is equivalent to CHEM UN1404 General Chemistry II Lecture.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1404 002/64478 Tu Tu Th Th 6:10p - 7:35p
309 HAVEMEYER HALL
Ruben Savizky, Ruben Savizky 4 Open
General Chemistry II (Recitation)
CHEM S1406X 0 points.

To be enrolled in CHEM S1404X, you must be enrolled in CHEM S1406X.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1406 001/21136 Tu 5:00p - 5:50p
309 HAVEMEYER HALL
Ruben Savizky 0 Open
CHEM 1406 002/12225 Tu 7:50p - 8:40p
309 HAVEMEYER HALL
Ruben Savizky 0 Open
CHEM 1406 003/72173 Th 5:00p - 5:50p
309 HAVEMEYER HALL
Ruben Savizky 0 Open
CHEM 1406 004/28832 Th 7:50p - 8:40p
309 HAVEMEYER HALL
Ruben Savizky 0 Open
General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM S1500X 3 points.

Introduction to basic experimental techniques in chemistry, including quantitative procedures, chemical analysis, and descriptive chemistry. To be enrolled in CHEM S1500X you must also register for CHEM S1501X Lab Lecture M 3:00pm-4:15pm.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1500 003/11009 Tu 1:10p - 4:50p
302B HAVEMEYER HALL
Joseph Ulichny 3 Open
CHEM 1500 004/70957 W 1:10p - 4:50p
302C HAVEMEYER HALL
Joseph Ulichny 3 Limited Availability
CHEM 1500 005/27616 Th 1:10p - 4:50p
302 HAVEMEYER HALL
Joseph Ulichny 3 Open
CHEM 1500 006/62046 F 1:10p - 4:50p
302 HAVEMEYER HALL
Joseph Ulichny 3 Open
General Chemistry Laboratory Lecture
CHEM S1501X 0 points.

Lab lecture for CHEM S1500X General Chemistry Laboratory.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1501 003/26400 M 3:00p - 4:15p
309 HAVEMEYER HALL
Joseph Ulichny 0 Open
General Physics II Laboratory
PHYS S1292X 1 points.

Laboratory for PHYS 1202X. Assignments to laboratory sections are made after the first lecture. NOTE: Labs meet one day a week (Mon, Tues, Wed or Thurs) 1:00pm - 4:00pm only. There are no evening lab sections.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 1292 003/67691 M 1:00p - 4:00p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
PHYS 1292 004/15438 Tu 1:00p - 4:00p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
PHYS 1292 005/75386 W 1:00p - 4:00p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
PHYS 1292 006/66475 Th 1:00p - 4:00p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
PHYS 1292 007/77397 W 1:00p - 4:00p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
General Physics, II
PHYS S1202X 3 points.

Basic introduction to the study of electricity, magnetism, optics, special relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics. The accompanying laboratory is PHYS S1292X.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 1202 002/61212 M W 6:00p - 7:25p
301 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Eric Raymer 3 Open
Intermediate Macroeconomics
ECON S3213X 4 points.

Prerequisites: (MATH UN1101 or MATH UN1207) and ECON UN1105 or the equivalent. Corequisites: MATH UN1201. This course covers the determination of output, employment, inflation and interest rates. Topics include economic growth, business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy, consumption and savings and national income accounting. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3213 001/29648 Tu Th 10:15a - 11:50a
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Lorenzo Pessina 4 Open
Introduction to Econometrics
ECON S3412X 4 points.

Equivalent to ECON UN3412. Modern econometric methods, the general linear statistical model and its extensions, simultaneous equations and the identification problem, time series problems, forecasting methods, extensive practice with the analysis of different types of data.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3412 001/64078 M W 12:10p - 1:45p
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Seyhan Erden 4 Open
Introduction to Modern Analysis, I
MATH S4061X 3 points.

Elements of set theory and general topology. Metric spaces. Euclidian space. Continuous and differentiable functions. Riemann integral. Uniform convergence.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 4061 002/62428 Tu Th 6:15p - 7:50p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Fabio Nironi 3 Open
Linear Algebra
MATH S2010X 3 points.

Matrices, vector spaces, linear transformation, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, canonical forms, applications.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 2010 003/63644 M W 6:15p - 7:50p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Qixiao Ma 3 Open
Principles of Economics
ECON S1105X 4 points.

Equivalent to ECON UN1105, the first course for the major in economics. How a market economy determines the relative prices of goods, factors of production, and the allocation of resources; the circumstances under which it does these things efficiently. Why such an economy has fluctuations and how they may be controlled.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 1105 001/13042 Tu Th 1:15p - 2:50p
516 HAMILTON HALL
Jeremy Ward 4 Open
University Writing
ENGL S1010X 3 points.

Facilitates students' entry into the intellectual life of the university by helping them to become more capable and independent academic readers and writers. With its small section size and emphases on critical analysis, revision, collaboration, and research, the course leads students to develop specific skills and general habits of mind important to their future academic success. Students read and discuss a range of contemporary essays, complete regular informal reading and writing exercises, and write four longer papers.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 1010 001/21468 M W 1:00p - 2:35p
201B PHILOSOPHY HALL
Jack Lowery 3 Open
ENGL 1010 002/28441 Tu Th 11:00a - 12:35p
201B PHILOSOPHY HALL
Marcus Creaghan 3 Limited Availability
ENGL 1010 003/12996 M W 5:00p - 6:35p
201B PHILOSOPHY HALL
Kevin Windhauser 3 Open
ENGL 1010 004/83448 Tu Th 10:00a - 11:35a
402 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Adam Winters 3 Open
Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates
EEEB S1011C 3 points.

The study of nonhuman primate behavior from the perspective of phylogeny, adaptation, physiology and anatomy, and life history.  This course focuses on the four main problems primates face:  Finding appropriate food, avoiding being eaten themselves, reproducing in the face of competition and dealing with social partners.No previous knowledge of science is assumed. Fulfills a science requirement for most Columbia and GS undergraduates. Field trip:  Date TBD. Trip to zoo—during class time; students pay for public transportation

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Note:  Separate registration is not required for discussion section.  

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1011 001/76029 M M Tu Tu Tu Tu Tu Th Th Th Th Th 1:00p - 5:20p
652 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Jenna Lawrence 3 Open
Contemporary Biology Laboratory
BIOL S2501C 3 points.

The lab will focus on experiments in genetics and molecular biology with emphasis on data analysis and interpretation.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BIOL 2501 001/20688 M Tu W Th 1:10p - 5:00p
922 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Claire Hazen 3 Limited Availability
Statistical Machine Learning
STAT S5241D 3 points.

Open to MA students in Statistics only


The course will provide an introduction to Machine Learning and its core models and algorithms. The aim of the course is to provide students of statistics with detailed knowledge of how Machine Learning methods work and how statistical models can be brought to bear in computer systems - not only to analyze large data sets, but to let computers perform tasks that traditional methods of computer science are unable to address. Examples range from speech recognition and text analysis through bioinformatics and medical diagnosis. This course provides a first introduction to the statistical methods and mathematical concepts which make such technologies possible.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 5241 001/70583 M Tu W Th 2:45p - 4:20p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Gabriel Young 3 Open
0s and 1s: Digital and Computational Approaches to the Study of Medieval Art and Architect
AHIS S3219D 4 points.

In his Universal History of Numbers, Georges Ifrah recounted that he undertook his monumental study of numbers because a pupil once asked him “Where ‘Numbers’ Come From”. This course, 0s and 1s, considers the epilogue of the history of numbers: “Where did ‘Numbers’ bring us.” Today, the study of the art historian is flooded with an endless stream of visual, numerical, and electronic data. Computers and mobile devices offer sophisticated renderings of remote objects of art, spaces, and architecture. Digital technologies provide unprecedented means of analysis and research.  At the same time, however, new technologies bear on the overall direction art and architectural research is taking. This course investigates pros and cons of the new digital methods for art and architectural history. In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn the difference between observing art and architecture through digital media and direct contact with physical objects during museum visits at the Cloisters and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through the analysis of new methods for studying art and architecture from Europe and the Mediterranean in the Middle Ages, this course aims at introducing students to computational and digital art history. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3219 001/74157 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
930 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Stefaan Van Liefferinge 4 Open
18th Century & Romantic Poetry
ENGL S4401D 3 points.

This course is a study of romantic poetry and poetics but does not approach its subject from the belated perspective of the Victorians or the Moderns. Instead, the famous Romantics of the late 18th and early 19th centuries are viewed proleptically, from the vantage point of early and mid 18th-century poets who established the modern criteria and generated the forms and ideas later ingeniously personalized by the poets we customarily refer to as the Romantics. Indeed, though we shall spend the concluding half of our study with Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats, our study begins with the neoclassical romanticism of Pope, Thomson, Akenside, the Wartons, Gray, and Goldsmith. As such, our reading entails a study of lyric trends bridging 18th - and 19th-century verse and of related discourses in aesthetic psychology, moral philosophy, experimental religion, natural description, and affective criticism. We shall attend closely to rhetorical and prosodic elements, with a view to characteristic genres (ode, epistle, georgic, epitaph), innovative hybrids and new forms (elegy, the "conversational" poem). Recommended and required readings in prose are of the period and include theoretical and critical writings by our poets.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4401 001/26382 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
612 PHILOSOPHY HALL
Marianne Giordani 3 Open
Abnormal Behavior
PSYC S2620D 3 points.

An examination of definitions, theories, and treatments of abnormal behavior.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2620 001/28814 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
603 HAMILTON HALL
Karen Hebert 3 Open
Accelerated Elementary Reading, I and II
GERM S1115D 4 points.

Equivalent to GERM F1113-F1114. This accelerated survey of German grammar, reading techniques, and dictionary skills is designed primarily for graduate students preparing for reading proficiency exams or wishing to do research in German-language literature. Extensive exercises in translation, reading for general comprehension, and specialized reading are based on texts drawn from the students' fields of study. Although this course does not satisfy any part of the foreign language requirement for degree candidates, successful completion of the translation on the final exam fulfills the German reading proficiency requirement in most graduate programs.Students are advised that this course is a full-time commitment. Students should expect to study 2 hours every day for every hour spent in the classroom and additional time on weekends.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1115 001/71774 M Tu W Th 11:05a - 1:00p
315 HAMILTON HALL
Alwin Franke 4 Open
Advanced Painting Intensive
VIAR S4105D 6 points.

The Advanced Painting Intensive mentors a group of up to twelve students through individual and group critique, technical tutorials, exposure to the New York gallery and museum worlds, and lectures and critiques by nationally known visiting artists. The six-week, six-credit workshop is based on the elements and structure of Columbia's MFA degree program and is tailored to those who are interested in challenging and advancing their work in an immersive and nurturing environment. Additionally, the workshop is geared to those who desire to develop both a strong visual portfolio and a written package appropriate for applications to MFA programs. The Advanced Painting Intensive is led by Professor Gregory Amenoff, the Chair of Visual Arts at Columbia University. Professor Amenoff has exhibited his paintings nationally and internationally for four decades and was one of the founders of Columbia University's prestigious MFA visual arts program.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 4105 001/15474 M Tu W Th F 10:00a - 6:00p
310 DODGE BUILDING
Gregory Amenoff 6 Open
Africa and France
HIST S4779D 4 points.

This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current 'memory wars' in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Partially fulfills Global Core Requirement. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4779 001/19956 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
311 FAYERWEATHER
Gregory Mann 4 Open
American Art in the Global Context of the "Long" Nineteenth Century
AHIS S3442D 4 points.

Through an examination of painting, sculpture, decorative arts, photography and the visual culture of the United States from 1750 to 1914, the course will explore how American artists responded to and operated within the wider world. Addressing themes shared in common across national boundaries, the class will consider how American art participated in the revolutions and reforms of the "long" nineteenth century, ranging from Romanticism to Modernism. The period witnessed the emergence of new technologies for creating, using, and circulating images and objects, the expansion and transformation of exhibition and viewing practices, and the rise of new artistic institutions, as well as the metamorphosis of the United States from its colonial origins to that of a world power, including the profound changes that occurred during the Civil War. The class will investigate how American art engaged with international movements while constructing national identity during a period of radical transformation both at home and abroad. In addition to lectures/discussions in the classroom, field trips to the Metropolitan Museum (the American Wing, Nineteenth Century Wing, Galleries of Modem and Contemporary Art, and the Photography Study Collection), the Museum of Modem Art and the Whitney Museum of Art, represent a vital aspect of the course. One of the important questions raised in the class is the recent reinterpretation of American art's interaction with international movements in museum installations and scholarship, moving away from an isolationist approach to one that engages with global influence and awareness. Readings will draw not only from primarily sources, but also from many of the publications of the Terra Foundation, whose exhibitions and research programs work to encourage an understanding and exploration of American Art from a global context.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3442 001/71246 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
832 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Page Knox 4 Open
Analysis & Optimization
MATH S2500D 3 points.

Mathematical methods for economics. Quadratic forms, Hessian, implicit functions. Convex sets, convex functions. Optimization, constrained optimization, Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Elements of the calculus of variations and optimal control.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 2500 001/20302 M Tu W Th 2:45p - 4:20p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Dobrin Marchev 3 Open
Analysis of Algorithms
CSOR S4231D 3 points.

Introduction to the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Topics include models of computation, efficient sorting and searching, algorithms for algebraic problems, graph algorithms, dynamic programming, probabilistic methods, approximation algorithms, and NP-completeness.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSOR 4231 001/66892 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
524 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Eleni Drinea 3 Open
Anthropology of Violence
ANTH S3722D 3 points.

This course will explore contemporary anthropological approaches to the issue of violence with an exploration of three particular themes. Our main focus will be on the idea of representation, ethnographically and theoretically, of the concept of violence. First, we will look at how violence has been situated as an object of study within anthropology, as a theoretical concept as well as in practice. We will then look at the issue of terrorism and how anthropology as a discipline contributes to understanding this particular form of violence. Finally, we will consider gender-based violence with close attention to the colonial/post-colonial settings where Islam is a salient factor. Gender based violence is one of the main forces producing and reproducing gender inequality. We will pay particular attention to the concept of the "Muslim woman" in both the colonial and colonized imagination.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3722 001/74206 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Ellen Marakowitz 3 Open
Anti-Colonialism
ANTH S3921D 3 points.

The age of colonialism, so it seems, is long over. Decolonization has resulted in the emergence of postcolonial polities and societies that are now, in many instances, two generations old. But is it clear that the problem of colonialism has disappeared? Almost everywhere in the postcolonial world the project of building independent polities, economies and societies have faltered, sometimes run aground. Indeed, one might say that the anti-colonial dream of emancipation has evaporated. Through a careful exploration of the conceptual argument and rhetorical style of five central anti-colonial texts—C.L.R. James’ The Black Jacobins, Mahatma Gandhi’s Hind Swaraj, Aimé Cesairé’s Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi’s Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth—this course aims to inquire into the image of colonialism as a structure of dominant power, and the image of its anticipated aftermaths: What were the perceived ill-effects of colonial power? What did colonialism do to the colonized that required rectification? In what ways did the critique of colonial power (the identification of what was wrong with it) shape the longing for its anti-colonial overcoming?

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3921 001/13444 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
David Scott 3 Open
Artificial Intelligence
COMS S4701D 3 points.

Provides a broad understanding of the basic techniques for building intelligent computer systems. Topics include state-space problem representations, problem reduction and and-or graphs, game playing and heuristic search, predicate calculus, and resolution theorem proving, AI systems and languages for knowledge representation, machine learning and concept formation and other topics such as natural language processing may be included as time permits.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 4701 001/65676 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
545 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Ansaf Salleb-Aouissi 3 Open
Arts of China, Japan, and Korea
AHUM S2604D 3 points.

Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia. Partially fulfills Global Core Requirement. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 2604 001/99691 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Xiaohan Du 3 Limited Availability
Basic Mathematics
MATH S0065D 0 points.

Designed for students who have not attended school for some time or who do not have a firm grasp of high school mathematics. Recommended as a prerequisite for MATH S1003. Negative numbers, fractions, decimal notation, percentages, powers and roots, scientific notation, introduction to algebra, linear and quadratic equations, Pythagorean theorem, coordinates and graphs.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 0065 001/12207 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
307 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Lindsay Piechnik 0 Open
Biodiversity, Conservation, and Behavior Change
EEEB S4076D 3 points.

This course focuses on the potential value of behavior change programs to improve biodiversity conservation, with a focus on the use of social marketing approaches.  Through analysis of case studies from endangered parrot conservation to consumer demand for sustainably produced coffee, we examine the power of conservation marketing to move people beyond raised awareness and good intentions to secure and maintained pro-conservation behaviors.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 4076 001/74120 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Leo Douglas 3 Open
Buddhism: East Asian
RELI S2308D 4 points.

Lecture and discussion. An introductory survey that studies East Asian Buddhism as an integral , living religious tradition. Emphasis on the reading of original treatises and historiographies in translation, while historical events are discussed in terms of their relevance to contemporary problems confronted by Buddhism. Global Core.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RELI 2308 001/60031 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 10:35a
516 HAMILTON HALL
Michael Como 4 Open
Calculus, I
MATH S1101D 3 points.

Functions, limits, derivatives, introduction to integrals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1101 001/15039 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Feiqi Jiang 3 Open
Calculus, II
MATH S1102D 3 points.

Methods of integration, applications of the integral, Taylor's theorem, infinite series.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1102 001/22734 M Tu W Th 1:00p - 2:35p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Ivan Danilenko 3 Open
Calculus, III
MATH S1201D 3 points.

Columbia College students who aim at an economics major AND have at least the grade of B in Calculus I may take Calculus III directly after Calculus I. However, all students majoring in engineering, science, or mathematics should follow Calculus I with Calculus II. Vectors in dimensions 2 and 3, complex numbers and the complex exponential function with applications to differential equations, Cramer's rule, vector-valued functions of one variable, scalar-valued functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, surfaces, optimization, the method of Lagrange multipliers.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1201 001/73771 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Penka Marinova 3 Open
Calculus, IV
MATH S1202D 3 points.

Double and triple integrals. Change of variables. Line and surface integrals. Grad, div, and curl. Vector integral calculus: Green's theorem, divergence theorem, Stokes' theorem

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1202 001/21518 M Tu W Th 1:00p - 2:35p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Mitchell Faulk 3 Open
Classical Mythology
CLLT S3310D 3 points.

Introduction to and analysis of major myths in classical literature. Topics include the changing attitudes and applications of myth from Greek epic to tragedy, as well as modern approaches to myth. Readings include Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. All readings in English.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLLT 3310 001/21935 Tu Th 4:00p - 7:10p
309 HAMILTON HALL
Isaia Crosson 3 Open
College Algebra and Analytic Geometry
MATH S1003D 3 points.

Algebra review, graphs and functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, conic sections, systems of equations in two variables, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and trigonometric identities, applications of trigonometry, sequences, series, and limits.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1003 001/67292 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:25p
407 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Tomasz Owsiak 3 Open
Comic Books and Graphic Novels as Literature
ENGL S4526D 3 points.

In his 1924 book, The Seven Lively Arts, cultural critic Gilbert Seldes wrote, "With those who hold that a comic strip cannot be a work of art I shall not traffic." This course will take a prolonged look at this form of art in order to trace the history of comics and graphic novels in America. Focusing on representative texts that define and redefine the medium, we will learn how to approach comics as a distinct literary and visual form, while familiarizing ourselves with the critical vocabulary of "sequential art." By examining the graphic novel with an eye toward the literary, the course will explore a variety of genres and the ways they deploy conventional literary forms such as allegory, epic, character, setting, symbolism, and metaphor. We will consider how comics resist, represent, and entrench dominant cultural ideologies about power, myth, heroism, humor, adolescence, gender, sexuality, family, poverty, religion, censorship, and the immigrant experience. The course will provide students with the critical tools to read this key vehicle of contemporary creative expression. Readings will include seminal works and newer classics, by Gaiman, Bell, Miller, Moore, Crumb, Bell, Spiegelman, Ware, Derf, and shorter pieces by many others. In addition, we will read selections from texts on graphic narrative theory and comics history, beginning with Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics. Students must attend the first lecture. Instructor permission is required for registration after 5/18.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4526 001/17471 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
401 HAMILTON HALL
Karen Green 3 Open
Comparative Jurisprudence
LAW S3150D 3 points.

Jurisprudence, at its core, is the study of legal theory. Fundamentally, however, what is "law?" By studying alternative constitutional systems, what can we learn about the legal foundations of various governments and societies? What influence has legal theory had on the development of very different government structures, and how do different governments grapple with constitutional controversy? This course is designed to explore the basic foundational principles that make up the study of legal theory. It begins by studying the core schools of thought, including natural law, legal positivism, and legal realism. The course then uses these basic concepts to explore and understand the greater development of fundamental, constitutional law and theory within different legal systems in different countries. By comparing various constitution and government structures, using basic legal philosophy as a guide, students will gain a valuable base understanding of the development and execution of legal thought within different societies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LAW 3150 001/12647 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:20p
214 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Christopher Riano 3 Open
Computer Architecture
CSEE S4824D 3 points.

Focuses on advanced topics in computer architecture, illustrated by case studies from classic and modern processors. Fundamentals of quantitative analysis. Pipelining. Memory hierarchy design. Instruction-level and thread-level parallelism. Data-level parallelism and graphics processing units. Multiprocessors. Cache coherence. Interconnection networks. Multi-core processors and systems-on-chip. Platform architectures for embedded, mobile, and cloud computing.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSEE 4824 001/66424 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
337 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Luca Carloni 3 Open
Computer Networks
CSEE S4119D 3 points.

Pre or Corequisites: Calculus based Probability and Statistics. Introduction to computer networks and the technical foundations of the Internet, including applications, protocols, local area networks, algorithms for routing and congestion control, security, elementary performance evaluation. Several written and programming assignments required.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSEE 4119 001/75804 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
1127 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Gil Zussman 3 Open
Computer Science Theory
COMS S3261D 3 points.

Regular languages: deterministic and non-deterministic finite automata, regular expressions. Context-free languages: context-free grammars, push-down automata. Turing machines, the Chomsky hierarchy, and the Church-Turing thesis. Introduction to Complexity Theory and NP-Completeness.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 3261 001/74588 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
227 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Xi Chen 3 Open
Consumer Culture in Modern Europe
HIST S4327D 4 points.

The development of the modern culture of consumption, with particular attention to the formation of the woman consumer.  Topics include commerce and the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, feminine fashion and conspicuous consumption, and the birth of advertising. Examination of novels, fashion magazines, and advertising images.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4327 001/72208 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
301M FAYERWEATHER
Lisa Tiersten 4 Open
Corporate Finance
ECON S4280D 3 points.

An introduction to the economic principles, theories and basic tools underlying the financial decisions of firms. The topics covered include financial statement analysis, net present value analysis, time value of money, valuation of perpetuities and annuities, opportunity cost of capital, weighted average cost of capital, valuation of bonds and stocks, capital budgeting, dividend policy, market efficiency, capital structure, Modigliani-Miller theorem, option valuation and risk management. Every effort would be made to relate the course material to real-world financial applications.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4280 001/70072 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Ye Zhang 3 Open
Crime and Punishment in the Middles Ages
HIST S4083D 4 points.

This course sets out to explore the nature of crime, particularly those involving violence, and the practices advanced to control and restrict it in the wide geographical area of Europe, with an emphasis on France, England and Italy. The course material will be studied thematically. Themes will include the violent crimes, political violence, the development of courts, the development of criminal law, investigations of specific types of crime such as murder, theft, crimes against women, the mentality and methods of punishment, prisons, torture, and the methods of inquisition.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4083 001/75022 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
311 FAYERWEATHER
Neslihan Senocak 4 Open
Developing and Implementing New Ideas: Entrepreneurship
BUSI PS5030D 3 points.

Interested in starting your own company? Do you have an idea for a new product or service? Have you come up with a way to improve something that already exists? This course tackles the central business concept of how one creates, builds and leads companies. It looks at aspects of entrepreneurship and leadership for both individuals and teams in the face of complex situations. Using the case study method as taught in business school, also known as "participant-centered learning," this course puts students in the role of an entrepreneur facing critical business decisions. A selection of guest speakers will offer firsthand experience on innovation and entrepreneurship.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5030 001/68441 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
644 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Grant Son 3 Limited Availability
Developing and Implementing New Ideas: Entrepreneurship
BUSI K4030D 3 points.

Interested in starting your own company? Do you have an idea for a new product or service? Have you come up with a way to improve something that already exists? This course tackles the central business concept of how one creates, builds and leads companies. It looks at aspects of entrepreneurship and leadership for both individuals and teams in the face of complex situations. Using the case study method as taught in business school, also known as "participant-centered learning," this course puts students in the role of an entrepreneur facing critical business decisions. A selection of guest speakers will offer firsthand experience on innovation and entrepreneurship.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Discrete Mathematics: Introduction to Combinatorics and Graph Theory
COMS S3203D 3 points.

Logic and formal proofs, sequences and summation, mathematical induction, binomial coefficients, elements of finite probability, recurrence relations, equivalence relations and partial orderings, and topics in graph theory (including isomorphism, traversability, planarity, and colorings).

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 3203 001/23551 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
633 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Robert Holliday 3 Open
Donatello to Degas: Dance and the Early Modern Artist
AHIS S3306D 3 points.

From an interdisciplinary point of view, this course investigates the representation of dance in Early Modern art.  Using case studies of canonical works by artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Raphael, Bruegel, Poussin, and Degas, we will examine images that exhibit both explicit and implicit depictions of dance.  From this point of departure, we will ask why the performing arts exert such a force upon how we experience and interpret a wide range of figures and figural compositions.  More specific questions will arise in relationship to the following themes: the impact of Antiquity, the simultaneous rise of art and dance theory, the representation of music and time, parallels between composition and choreography, the concept of grace, dance and religion, the depiction of violence, and the modern viewers informative eye.  Ultimately, the class aims to nurture a productive exchange between students from different departments, as well as foster the potential for pushing interdisciplinary study to its limits.  Lectures, discussions, and readings will be complemented by trips to museums, libraries, and performances.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3306 001/16659 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
832 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Olivia Powell 3 Open
Earth, Moon, and Planets
ASTR S1403D 3 points.

May be counted toward the science requirement for most Columbia University undergraduate students. The overall architecture of the solar system. Motions of the celestial sphere. Time and the calendar. Major planets, the earth-moon system, minor planets, comets. Life in the solar system and beyond.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ASTR 1403 001/61611 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
425 PUPIN LABORATORIES
James Applegate 3 Open
Elementary French, I
FREN S1101D 4 points.

Equivalent to FREN C1101 or F1101. Designed to help students understand, speak, read, and write French, and to recognize cultural features of French-speaking communities, now with the help of a newly digitized audio program. Students learn to provide information in French about their feelings, environment, families, and daily activities. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video material.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 1101 001/66932 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:05p
413 HAMILTON HALL
Samuel Skippon 4 Open
FREN 1101 002/67332 M Tu W Th 6:00p - 8:05p
413 HAMILTON HALL
Sophie Queuniet 4 Open
Elementary French, II
FREN S1102D 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee

,

Equivalent to FREN C1102 or F1102. Continues the work of French S1101D and completes the study of elementary French. Students continue to develop communicative skills, narrating recent events (past, present, and future), describing daily life activities, and learning about cultural features of France and of the wider Francophone world. Following the communicative approach, students, with the help of the instructor, learn to solve problems using the language, to communicate their feelings and opinions, and to obtain information from others. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 1102 001/76243 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:05p
407 HAMILTON HALL
Pascale Crepon 4 Open
Elementary Italian, I
ITAL S1101D 4 points.

Equivalent to ITAL V1101. Students will develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Italian and an understanding of Italian culture. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to provide basic information in Italian about themselves, their families, interests, likes and dislikes, and daily activities; participate in a simple conversation on everyday topics; to read edited texts on familiar topics; and produce Italian with basic grammatical accuracy and accurate pronunciation.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1101 001/66510 M Tu W Th 11:00a - 1:05p
509 HAMILTON HALL
Maria Luisa Gozzi 4 Open
Elementary Spanish, I
SPAN S1101D 4 points.

Elementary course, equivalent to SPAN V1101 or F1101. Fundamental principles of grammar; practice in pronunciation. Reading and conversation are introduced from the beginning. Use of the language laboratory is required.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 001/70922 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
313 HAMILTON HALL
Jennifer Calles Izquierdo 4 Open
SPAN 1101 002/27581 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 8:20p
313 HAMILTON HALL
Anayvelyse Allen-Mossman 4 Open
Elementary Spanish, II
SPAN S1102D 4 points.

Equivalent to SPAN F1102 or V1102. Grammar exercises, prose readings, and practice in the spoken language.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 001/18669 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
315 HAMILTON HALL
Juan Jimenez-Caicedo 4 Limited Availability
Evolutionary Psychology
PSYC S2490D 3 points.

Traditional psychologists have focused primarily on answering “how?” questions regarding the mechanisms that underlie behavior (i.e. How does the system work?).  In contrast, evolutionary psychologists focus primarily on answering “why?” questions (i.e. Why does this system exist, and why does it have the form it does?).  This course is designed to apply our knowledge of evolutionary theory to psychology in order to answer such questions. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2490 001/87696 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Lawrence Reed 3 Open
Experimental Psychology: Human Behavior
PSYC S1420D 4 points.

Introduction to the techniques of research employed in the study of human behavior. Students gain experience in the conduct of research, including design of simple experiments, observation and measurement techniques, and the analysis of behavioral data.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1420 001/64460 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:50p
200B SCHERMERHORN HALL
Patricia Lindemann 4 Open
Exploring Sharia: Islamic Law
RELI S4322D 4 points.

The platform of every modern Islamist political party calls for the implementation of the sharia. This term is invariably (and incorrectly) interpreted as an unchanging legal code dating back to 7th century Arabia. In reality, Islamic law is an organic and constantly evolving human project aimed at ascertaining God's will in a given historical and cultural context. This course offers a detailed and nuanced look at the Islamic legal methodology and its evolution over the last 1400 years. The first part of the semester is dedicated to classical Islamic jurisprudence, concentrating on the manner in which jurists used the Qur'an, the Sunna (the model of the Prophet), and rationality to articulate a coherent legal system. The second part of the course focuses on those areas of the law that engender passionate debate and controversy in the contemporary world. Specifically, we examine the discourse surrounding Islamic family (medical ethics, marriage, divorce, women's rights) and criminal (capital punishment, apostasy, suicide/martyrdom) law. The course concludes by discussing the legal implications of Muslims living as minorities in non-Islamic countries and the effects of modernity on the foundations of Islamic jurisprudence.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
RELI 4322 001/68091 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
201 80 CLAREMONT
Najam Haider 4 Open
Fiction Writing Workshop
WRIT S1001D 3 points.

The Fiction Writing Workshop is designed for students who have little or no experience writing imaginative prose. Students are introduced to a range of craft concerns through exercises and discussions, and eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

,

Enrollment limited to 15.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1001 001/27651 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
411 DODGE BUILDING
Erroll McDonald 3 Open
French Expressive Dance in New York City and Paris
FREN S3880D 3 points.

Cross-Atlantic influences from both French ballet and French modern dance as seen on the stages of New York City. The course examines not only French dancers and choreographers, but also French conceptions of the expressive body seen in other urban art forms. We study the New York School of Poetry, Painting, Theatre, Dance and Music; French influences on the repertory of American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet; the Paris Opera Ballet; the contributions of American choreographers such as Merce Cunningham and Trisha Brown on French dance; and the theatrical impulse in recent French contemporary dance. We will make use of French critical theory ( Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Barthes, Proust, and the work of recent French feminists) to understand how distinct cultures create differing notions of the expressive body. These texts will also help us to see how individual and social movement patterns are created on the stages and in the streets of metropolitan Paris and New York City. When possible, we will attend modern dance performances, and productions of American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet. As well, we will visit New York City museums and gallery exhibits, and allied cultural events that help to illustrate the lyric French style. The course will be conducted in English. No prerequisites.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 3880 001/16273 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
413 HAMILTON HALL
Jonathan Robinson-Appels 3 Closed
Fun City: The Architecture of New York’s Entertainment, Leisure, and Culture Industry
AHIS S3409D 4 points.

A city that never sleeps is one in which people play as hard as they work. This course will focus on the buildings, parks, and other venues in New York constructed specifically for play and relaxation. Organized typologically, it will cover everything from parks, playgrounds, and Broadway theaters, to World's Fairs, hotels, and museums-- places in which the city's residents seek escape from the stress of their daily lives. In the classroom, in the archival collections of Avery Library and in numerous field trips around the city and the phot, we will analyze these structures and milieux from the perspective of architectural history and urban design, trace their origins and development from the founding of the city to the present and look at how they have helped cut across but also harden class lines. We will examine the formal differences between high-brow and popular venues, discuss the problems of private and public patronage, as well as the financial and social impact of the entertainment industry on the wellbeing of the city as a whole. Above all, we will explore the ways in which places of play, recreation and escape have shaped the identity of and created a distinct look for New York, which, despite the enormous revenue that the culture and entertainment industry generates, are often at odds with the city's reality.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3409 001/75373 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Irina Oryshkevich 4 Open
Game Theory
ECON S4415D 3 points.

Equivalent to ECON UN4415. Introduction to the systematic treatment of game theory and its applications in economic analysis.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4415 001/28432 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
503 HAMILTON HALL
Wouter Vergote 3 Open
General Chemistry I (Lecture)
CHEM S1403D 4 points.

Topics include stoichiometry, states of matter, nuclear properties, electronic structures of atoms, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, introduction to quantum mechanics and atomic theory, introduction to organic, biological chemistry and inorganic coordination chemistry. Topical subjects may include spectroscopy, solid state and materials science, polymer science and macromolecular structures. The order of presentation of topics may differ from the order presented here.  Students are required to attend the separate daily morning recitations which accompany the lectures (total time block: MTWR 9:30-12:20). Registering for CHEM S1403D will automatically register students for the recitation section. Students who wish to take the full sequence of General Chemistry Lectures and General Chemistry Laboratory should also register for CHEM S1404Q and CHEM S1500X (see below). This course is equivalent to CHEM W1403 General Chemistry I Lecture.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1403 001/13441 M Tu W Th 10:35a - 12:20p
320 HAVEMEYER HALL
Jason Polisar 4 Open
General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM S1500D 3 points.

Introduction to basic experimental techniques in chemistry, including quantitative procedures, chemical analysis, and descriptive chemistry. To be enrolled in CHEM S1500D you must also register for CHEM S1501D Lab Lecture MW 1:00pm-2:15pm.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1500 001/63262 M W 2:25p - 6:00p
302 HAVEMEYER HALL
DongHong Sun 3 Open
General Chemistry Laboratory Lecture
CHEM S1501D 0 points.

Lab lecture for CHEM S1500D General Chemistry Laboratory.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1501 001/18704 M W 1:00p - 2:15p
209 HAVEMEYER HALL
DongHong Sun 0 Open
General Physics I Laboratory
PHYS S1291D 1 points.

Laboratory for PHYS S1201D. Assignments to laboratory sections are made after the first lecture, offered Mon/Wed or Tues/Thurs 10.30AM-1.30PM.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 1291 001/17870 M W 10:30a - 1:30p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
PHYS 1291 002/68907 Tu Th 10:30a - 1:30p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
General Physics, I
PHYS S1201D 3 points.

Assignments to discussion sections are made after the first lecture. Basic introduction to the study of mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics. The accompanying laboratory is PHYS S1291D. NOTE: There are two recitation sessions that meet for one hour each week. The recitation times will be selected at the first class meeting.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 1201 001/70123 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 10:15a
428 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Burton Budick 3 Open
Global Energy and Climate Change: Security and Geopolitics
POLS S4811D 3 points.

The course focuses on the nexus between energy and security as it reveals in the policies and interaction of leading energy producers and consumers. Topics include: hydrocarbons and search for stability and security in the Persian Gulf, Caspian basin, Eurasia, Africa and Latin America; Russia as a global energy player; role of natural gas in the world energy balance and European energy security; transformation of the global energy governance structure; role and evolution of the OPEC; introduction into energy economics; dynamics and fundamentals of the global energy markets; IOCs vs NOCs; resource nationalism, cartels, sanctions and embargoes; Asia's growing energy needs and its geo-economic and strategic implications; nuclear energy and challenges to non-proliferation regime; alternative and renewable sources of energy; climate change and attempts of environmental regulation; emerging international carbon regimes and search for optimal models of sustainable development. Special focus on implications of the shale revolution and technological innovations on U.S. energy security.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4811 001/70127 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
703 HAMILTON HALL
Albert Bininachvili 3 Limited Availability
Hellenism and the Topographical Imagination
GRKM S3935D 3 points.

Course Overview: This course examines the way particular spaces—cultural, urban, literary—serve as sites for the production and reproduction of cultural and political imaginaries. It places particular emphasis on the themes of the polis, the city, and the nation-state as well as on spatial representations of and responses to notions of the Hellenic across time. Students will consider a wide range of texts as spaces—complex sites constituted and complicated by a multiplicity of languages—and ask: To what extent is meaning and cultural identity, site-specific? How central is the classical past in Western imagination? How have great metropolises such as Paris, Istanbul, and New York fashioned themselves in response to the allure of the classical and the advent of modern Greece? How has Greece as a specific site shaped the study of the Cold War, dictatorships, and crisis? 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GRKM 3935 001/72904 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
309 HAMILTON HALL
Dimitrios Antoniou 3 Open
History of Capitalism
HIST S3116D 4 points.

Capitalism shapes every aspect of our daily lives. Thinkers on both the left and the right of the political spectrum agree that capitalism structures our economic, social, and political relationships. Yet, there is little agreement as to the definition of capitalism and its normative implications. The definition and interpretation of capitalism differs across time and space, always evolving in response to challenges, crises, and contradictions. 


The aim of this course is to provide students with analytical tools to think critically and historically about the concept of capitalism. By studying how philosophers, economists, and political theorists have defined and described the concept of capitalism throughout its history (from the early seventeenth century to the present), students will be provided with a set of terminologies and analytical frameworks that enable them to interrogate the various dimensions of capitalism. The readings in the course are selected to illustrate the fact that capitalism has always been controversial. We will read texts authored by both proponents and critics of capitalism. We will explore how various canonical figures have thought about private property, markets, money, economic growth, injustice, inequality, alienation, and socialism.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3116 001/73496 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
302 FAYERWEATHER
Carl Wennerlind 4 Open
Industrial Organization
ECON S4251D 3 points.

The study of industrial behavior based on game-theoretic oligopoly models. Topics include pricing models, strategic aspects of business practice, vertical integration, and technological innovation.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4251 001/20737 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
405 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Arpita Saluja 3 Open
Intensive Elementary German, I and II
GERM S1121D 8 points.

Equivalent to GERM V1101 and V1102. This intensive program provides one year of German in one six-week session. The course enables students to understand, speak, read, and write in German about a range of subjects: family activities, studies, work and home life, as well as travel, economics, and current events. Classes are conducted entirely in German and supplemented with written homework and audiovisual materials. The program draws on the German heritage of New York City (museums, Goethe Institut, restaurants, etc.). Students are encouraged to attend German-language films and musical performances. Students have many opportunities for informal conversation. Final grades are based on frequent oral and written tests, a project on German culture in New York, and a final examination. Students are advised that this course consitutes a full-time commitment. The workload of this course is very intense and students will be expected to spend 4-6 hours studying every day outside of class and additional time on weekends.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1121 001/60430 M Tu W Th 11:00a - 3:00p
313 HAMILTON HALL
Simona Vaidean 8 Open
Intensive Elementary Greek
GREK S1121D 6 points.

Equivalent to Greek 1101 and 1102. Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term to prepare the student to enter Greek 1201 or 1202. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 1121 001/14240 M Tu W Th 1:00p - 4:10p
301 HAMILTON HALL
Maria Combatti 6 Open
Intensive Elementary Latin
LATN S1121D 6 points.

Equivalent to Latin 1101 and 1102. Covers all of Latin grammar and syntax in one term to prepare the student to enter Latin 1201 or 1202. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1121 001/62529 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 12:10p
318 HAMILTON HALL
Kristina Milnor 6 Open
Intermediate French, I
FREN S2101D 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee


Equivalent to French C1201 and F1201. Prepares students for advanced French language and cultures, focusing on developing correct usage through explanations and practice. Gaining a deeper understanding of the French language through readings of poems and short stories, students practice a variety of communication tasks, as they are engaged in ever more complex forms of discourse. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 2101 001/22775 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:05p
411 HAMILTON HALL
Wesley Gunter 4 Open
Intermediate French, II
FREN S2102D 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee


Equivalent to FREN C1202 and F1202. Continues to prepare students for advanced French language and culture with an emphasis on developing highly accurate speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students examine complex topics, using the French language in diverse contexts, and read and actively discuss a wide variety of texts from France and the French speaking world. Daily assignments, quizzes, and screening of video materials.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 2102 001/66111 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:15p
507 HAMILTON HALL
Caio Ferreira 4 Open
Intermediate German, I
GERM S2101D 4 points.

Equivalent to GERM UN2101. Prepares students for GERM UN2102 and for advanced German language and literature courses. Topics include personal interests, biographies, German unification, stereotypes, and German-American relations. Upon completion of the course, students should achieve intermediate-high proficiency (ACTFL scale) in speaking, listening, reading, and writing German. Students planning to study in Berlin in spring are advised to complete GERM S2101 in the Summer Session. Students are advised that this course is a full-time commitment. Students should expect to study 2 hours every day for every hour spent in the classroom and additional time on weekends.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2101 001/63006 M Tu W Th 4:05p - 6:00p
404 HAMILTON HALL
Irene Motyl 4 Open
Intermediate Spanish, I
SPAN S2101D 4 points.

Equivalent to SPAN C1201 or F1201. Rapid grammar review, composition, and reading of literary works by contemporary authors.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 001/26365 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
316 HAMILTON HALL
David Mejia 4 Open
SPAN 2101 003/22248 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
507 HAMILTON HALL
Francisco Meizoso 4 Open
Intermediate Spanish, II
SPAN S2102D 4 points.

Equivalent to SPAN C1202 or F1202. Readings of contemporary authors, with emphasis on class discussion and composition.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 001/17453 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 8:20p
315 HAMILTON HALL
Guadalupe Ruiz-Fajardo 4 Open
International Political Economy
INAF S6820D 3 points.

This course serves as an introduction to the study of international political and economic relations. We look at the connections between politics and economics as well as markets and governments and relate them to key substantive issue areas such as finance, trade, investment, marketing, income inequality and poverty, and globalization. In examining the issue areas, we shall look both at how scholars think about them and how private and public decision makers analyze and impact them.  The teaching is informed by the sharing with students knowledge deriving from multiple disciplines, cultures, and languages to help them gain useful real-world insights.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6820 001/21554 M W 2:00p - 5:10p
1102 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Giuseppe Ammendola 3 Open
International Relations: Theory & Concepts
INAF S6800D 3 points.

Through a review of major academic literature, lectures, and class discussion, this course examines many of the central concepts, theories, and analytical tools used in contemporary social science to understand international affairs. The theoretical literature is drawn from fields including comparative politics, international relations, political sociology, and economics. The course is designed to enhance students' abilities to think critically and analytically about current problems and challenges in international politics.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6800 001/73806 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
801 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Hisham Aidi 3 Open
Intro to Symbolic Logic
PHIL S3411D 3 points.

Advanced introduction to classical sentential and predicate logic. No previous acquaintance with logic is required; nonetheless a willingness to master technicalities and to work at a certain level of abstraction is desirable.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3411 001/74570 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
716 PHILOSOPHY HALL
Michael Nielsen 3 Open
Introduction to Computer Science and Programming in Java
COMS S1004D 3 points.

A general introduction to computer science for science and engineering students interested in majoring in computer science or engineering. Covers fundamental concepts of computer science, algorithmic problem-solving capabilities, and introductory Java programming skills. Assumes no prior programming background.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 1004 001/15855 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
614 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Paul Blaer 3 Open
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
PSYC S2280D 3 points.

Introduction to the scientific study of human development, with an emphasis on psychobiological processes underlying perceptual, cognitive, and emotional development.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2280 001/76203 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Maria Crisafi 3 Open
Introduction to Finance
BUSI PS5001D 3 points.

Students will be introduced to the fundamental financial issues of the modern corporation. By the end of this course, students will understand the basic concepts of financial planning, managing growth; debt and equity sources of financing and valuation; capital budgeting methods; and risk analysis, cost of capital, and the process of securities issuance.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5001 001/82146 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
503 HAMILTON HALL
Perry Beaumont 3 Open
BUSI 5001 D02/81797 Th 8:10p - 10:00p
ONLINE ONLY
Mario Gonzalez-Corzo 3 Open
Introduction to Human Rights
HRTS S4020D 3 points.

This course will provide a wide-ranging survey of conceptual foundations and issues in contemporary human rights. The class will examine the philosophical origins of human rights, contemporary debates, the evolution of human rights, key human rights documents, and the questions of human rights enforcement. This course will examine specific civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights and various thematic topics in human rights.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 4020 001/67309 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
405 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Joseph Chuman 3 Open
Introduction to Marketing & Marketing Management
BUSI PS5020D 3 points.

Students will learn fundamental marketing concepts and their application. By the end of this class you will know: the elements of a market, company strategy, how to identify customers and competition, the fundamental elements of the marketing mix (product, price, placement and promotion) how to research consumer behavior, and pricing strategies. Students will have extensive use of case study projects.Please note that tuition is the same for online and on-campus courses, there is an additional $85 course fee for online courses.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5020 001/63004 Tu Th 6:10p - 9:30p
603 HAMILTON HALL
Beth Hirschhorn 3 Open
BUSI 5020 D02/27191 Tu 8:10p - 10:00p
ONLINE ONLY
Lauri Harrison 3 Open
Introduction to Modern Analysis, I
MATH S4061D 3 points.

Elements of set theory and general topology. Metric spaces. Euclidian space. Continuous and differentiable functions. Riemann integral. Uniform convergence.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 4061 001/27998 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:20p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Drew Youngren 3 Open
Introduction to Photography
VIAR S3701D 3 points.

An introductory course in black-and-white photography, Photography I is a prerequisite for advanced photography classes held in the fall and spring. Students are initially instructed in proper camera use and basic film exposure and development. Then the twice weekly meetings are divided into lab days where students learn and master the fundamental tools and techniques of traditional darkroom work used in 8x10 print production and classroom days where students present their work and through the language of photo criticism gain an understanding of photography as a medium of expression. Admitted students must obtain a manually focusing 35mm camera with adjustable f/stops and shutter speeds. No prior photography experience is required.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3701 001/67726 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
212 DODGE BUILDING
Alexandra Strada 3 Limited Availability
Introduction to Probability and Inference
STAT S4001D 3 points.

Life is a gamble and with some knowledge of probability / statistics is easier evaluate the risks and rewards involved.  Probability theory allows us take a known underlying model and estimate how likely will we be able to see future events. Statistical Inference allows us to take data we have seen and estimate the missing parts of an unknown model. The first part of the course focus on the former and the second part the latter.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4001 001/11426 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
503 HAMILTON HALL
David Rios 3 Open
Introduction to Statistics (with calculus)
STAT S1201D 3 points.

Designed for students who desire a strong grounding in statistical concepts with a greater degree of mathematical rigor than in STAT W1111. Random variables, probability distributions, pdf, cdf, mean, variance, correlation, conditional distribution, conditional mean and conditional variance, law of iterated expectations, normal, chi-square, F and t distributions, law of large numbers, central limit theorem, parameter estimation, unbiasedness, consistency, efficiency, hypothesis testing, p-value,confidence intervals. maximum likelihood estimation. Satisfies the pre-requisites for ECON W3412.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 1201 001/63679 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
327 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Yayun Hsu 3 Open
Introduction to Statistics (without calculus)
STAT S1101D 3 points.

Designed for students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. This course satisfies the statistics requirements of all majors except statistics, economics, and engineering. Graphical and numerical summaries, probability, theory of sampling distributions, linear regression, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing are taught as aids to quantitative reasoning and data analysis. Use of statistical software required. Illustrations are taken from a variety of fields. Data-collection/analysis project with emphasis on study designs is part of the coursework requirement.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 1101 001/72590 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
903 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Guanhua Fang 3 Open
Introduction to Video Storytelling
JOUR S3016D 3 points.

The Introduction to Video Storytelling course teaches students the basics of conceiving, researching, and reporting a story through video. Students will learn to think critically about what makes for a good video story--what makes it newsworthy, what makes video the proper medium for conveying that story--and how to execute using the latest technology. Students will learn how to use and handle a camera, how to best record sound, how to properly frame and light a subject or scene, as well as learn how to use Adobe Premiere editing software. Students will have one complete video story at the end of the 6-week course.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
JOUR 3016 001/62028 M W 4:10p - 6:20p
601A JOURNALISM BUILDING
Rhon Flatts 3 Open
Jackson Pollock and the NY School
AHIS S3426D 3 points.

Coming on the heels of the MoMA's blockbuster exhibit, this seminar will trace the rise and fall of Abstract Expressionism, from its pre-World War II precipitates in Europe (Surrealism) and in America (Regionalism), to the crucial moment when, as scholar Serge Guilbaut has argued, New York "stole" the idea of modern art, and finally, through the decade when Pop Art rendered Abstract Expressionism obsolete. Although special emphasis will be given to Jackson Pollock, whose persona and work reside at the literal and figurative center of the movement, we will also look closely at works by Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, Willem DeKooning, Lee Krasner, Louise Bourgeois, Helen Frankenthaler, Eva Hesse, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Cy Twombly.  Class lectures and presentations will be supplemented with trips to New York's world-renowned museums.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3426 001/66462 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Kent Minturn 3 Open
Latino History in America
HIST S3596D 3 points.

Even before the U.S. existed as a republic, people from "Hispanic" and Indo-America have been incorporated into the culture, history, life, and occupational fabric of the United States. Yet, forces, figures, and factions in larger society frequently perceived Latin American heritage people as members of an "alien" culture. Through histories of coercion, migration, labor recruitment, family networks, religious conversion, wars of occupation, economic need, political exile, education inequities, electoral participation, and unimaginative representations in film, fiction, and broader popular culture, millions of people from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador, and the rest of Latin America have somehow become American, while still remaining outside the national community. This 3-point undergraduate lecture course will examine the process of departure and arrival-the historical forces pushing and pulling people from Latin America to the United States. We will also examine how "Spanish," "Latins," "Hispanics," and "Latinos" adjust, integrate, assimilate, resist, and adapt to the many forces that affect their lives in the U.S. over the last century and a half, creating new ethnic, racial and local identities in the process. By studying the experience of Latinos/as and Latin American immigrants with an eye toward patterns of second-class citizenship, identity formation, ethnic culture, community maturation, labor struggles, and social mobility, we will map out the heterogeneous mosaic of Latin American and Caribbean diasporas in the U.S. Due in large part to ongoing immigration from Mexico, the Mexican-origin population has grown appreciably from approximately 100,000 at the turn of the twentieth century to thirty-five million today (10% of the overall U.S. population and about 65% of the collective Latino community). We shall therefore pay special attention to what ethnic Mexicans, their offspring, and other Americans have had to say about the Mexican American experience and its effects on Latino/a social life as well as the nation's economy, society, and culture. Naturally, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, Hispanic Caribbean, and Central/South American communities in the United States will be examined as well. The study of Latino history is a young discipline, with many gaps and grey areas. It also exists in a complex and tense dialogue (often a monologue) within broader U.S. history. During the last two decades as the Latino population has ballooned to 56 million (1 in 6 Americans or 18% of the total population), there has also been a boom in research and writing in this field. Indeed, we will be taking advantage of some of its products, although its fruits are still uneven. This class is taught in mostly the modern period (after 1750) within United States history so it can count toward the history major or concentration. Where the course points may be applied depends on a student's field of specialization within their major or concentration. The course can also serve as three elective points toward degree progress.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3596 001/21172 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
311 FAYERWEATHER
Darius Echeverria 3 Open
Linear Algebra
MATH S2010D 3 points.

Matrices, vector spaces, linear transformation, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, canonical forms, applications.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 2010 001/72555 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
312 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Yang An 3 Open
Literary Impressionism: 1874-1925
CLEN S3208D 3 points.

This course takes the “impression” as a cue to explore fiction, philosophy, and visual art of the period from roughly 1874, the year of the first Impressionist exhibition, to 1925, well into the Modernist period, in order to understand how and why “impressionism” came to have such central importance for writers, artists, and other thinkers. We will ask how and why this idea developed over time, how it influenced and was influenced by movements in realism and Modernism, and how the idea of the impression continues to influence the arts today. This class will be both international in scope, focusing on works by French, British, and American authors, and interdisciplinary, encompassing works of different literary genres, including the novel, the short story, and the sketch, as well as works of painting, photography, philosophy, psychology, and criticism. Each week will include discussions of numerous paintings of the period, and we will often focus on the relationships between different artistic media. The course will also include field trips to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. Authors to be covered include Zola, Maupassant, Pater, James, Crane, Hemingway, Ford, and Woolf. This course will satisfy the department’s genre requirement for prose fiction.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CLEN 3208 001/69724 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
411 HAMILTON HALL
Zachary Roberts 3 Open
Machine Learning
COMS S4771D 3 points.

Topics from generative and discriminative machine learning including least squares methods, support vector machines, kernel methods, neural networks, Gaussian distributions, linear classification, linear regression, maximum likelihood, exponential family distributions, Bayesian networks, Bayesian inference, mixture models, the EM algorithm, graphical models and hidden Markov models. Algorithms implemented in Matlab.    

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 4771 001/14639 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
603 HAMILTON HALL
German Creamer 3 Open
Made in America: Mafia in Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, and The Sopranos
ENGL S4930D 3 points.

In this course (whose title is taken from the name of the final episode of The Sopranos) we focus on America’s three greatest practitioners of the so-called “Mafia Movie.” In the first half of the course we examine representations of Mafia in the films of Coppola and Scorsese; in the second half, we perform a comprehensive reading of The Sopranos, a serial that redefined not only the gangster genre, but the aesthetic possibilities of television itself. In addition to our close-readings of the primary cinematic texts, we will pay attention to literary, historical, and anthropological sources on Mafia, both in America and in Italy. In the unit on The Sopranos, we will also consider connections to other contemporary representations of American gangsterism, particularly in the medium of television.  Critical avenues privileged will include gender, sexuality, criminal and political economy, poetics of place, internationalism, dialect, plurilingualism and the politics of language, ethnicity and race, diaspora, philosophies of violence, philosophies of power.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4930 001/16255 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
602 NORTHWEST CORNER
Stefan Pedatella 3 Open
Managing Human Behavior in the Organization
BUSI PS5010D 3 points.

Students will gain an overview of major concepts of management and organization theory, concentrating on understanding human behavior in organizational contexts, with heavy emphasis on the application of concepts to solve managerial problems. By the end of this course students will have developed the skills to motivate employees, establish professional interpersonal relationships, take a leadership role, and conduct performance appraisal.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5010 001/28596 Tu Th 6:10p - 9:30p
516 HAMILTON HALL
Cynthia Thompson 3 Open
Masterpieces of Western Art
HUMA S1121D 3 points.

Equivalent to HUMA C1121 and F1121. Not a historical survey but an analytical study of masterpieces, including originals available in the metropolitan area. The chief purpose is to acquaint students with the experience of a work of art. A series of topics in the development of Western art, selected to afford a sense of the range of expressive possibilities in painting, sculpture, and architecture, such as the Parthenon, the Gothic cathedral, and works of Michelangelo, Bruegel, Picasso, and others. Space is limited. Columbia University undergraduates who need this course for graduation are encouraged to register during early registration.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HUMA 1121 001/23134 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Martina Mims 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 002/72955 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Tiffany Floyd 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 003/29613 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Adam Levine 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 004/64043 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Gillian Young 3 Closed
HUMA 1121 005/20702 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Anna Hetherington 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 006/11790 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Matthew Teti 3 Open
HUMA 1121 007/71739 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Daniel Ralston 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 009/27181 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Diana Mellon 3 Limited Availability
Masterpieces of Western Music
HUMA S1123D 3 points.

Equivalent to MUSI F1123 and C1123. Part of the Core Curriculum since 1947, Music Humanities aims to instill in students a basic comprehension of the many forms of the Western musical imagination. Its specific goals are to awaken and encourage in students an appreciation of music in the Western world, to help them learn to respond intelligently to a variety of musical idioms, and to engage them in the various debates about the character and purposes of music that have occupied composers and musical thinkers since ancient times. The course attempts to involve students actively in the process of critical listening, both in the classroom and in concerts that the students attend and write about. The extraordinary richness of musical life in New York is thus an integral part of the course. Although not a history of Western music, the course is taught in a chronological format and includes masterpieces by Josquin des Prez, Monteverdi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Verdi, Wagner, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky, among others. No previous knowledge of music required. Columbia University undergraduates who need this course for graduation are encouraged to register during early registration.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HUMA 1123 001/72972 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
404 DODGE BUILDING
Julia Hamilton 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 002/20719 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
620 DODGE BUILDING
Kathryn Radishofski 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 003/70540 Tu Th 6:00p - 9:10p
405 DODGE BUILDING
Thomas Smith 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 004/29631 M W 6:00p - 9:10p
404 DODGE BUILDING
Ralph Whyte 3 Open
HUMA 1123 005/71756 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
405 DODGE BUILDING
Paula Harper 3 Closed
HUMA 1123 011/11808 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
405 DODGE BUILDING
Taylor Brook 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 012/18287 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
622 DODGE BUILDING
Eamonn Bell 3 Open
HUMA 1123 014/64061 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
405 DODGE BUILDING
Mahir Cetiz 3 Open
HUMA 1123 015/62845 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
622 DODGE BUILDING
William Dougherty 3 Open
Medieval Romance: Beheadings, Magical Underworlds, and Other Marvels
ENGL S3121D 3 points.

“Romance” originated in twelfth-century France to distinguish narratives written in the vernacular, or romanz, from Latin texts. Yet, romance quickly developed into an expansive and fluid genre of fiction encompassing both knightly, courtly subjects and popular tales for non-aristocratic audiences. This course will examine the sensationalism of courtly tales of beheading and magical underworlds, in which protagonists confront issues of chivalry, romantic love, and the knightly quest. We will see how these tales were rivaled by popular romances with similarly marvelous features including monstrous genealogies and dogs reforming errant knights. Even though romance texts foreshadow the fast-paced modern adventure novel, we will explore how these texts provide more than enduring literary entertainment by examining the conflicts of courtship and marriage, ethical conduct, political authority, national identity, and religious faith therein. Attention to the formal properties of courtly and popular romances will help us consider what constitutes “high” and “low” art, and a range of interdisciplinary approaches that situate medieval romance in the context of art, manuscripts, and literary theory will stimulate discussions of the tremendous and diverse influence of these narratives on culture and thought.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3121 001/10279 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
309 HAMILTON HALL
Gillian Adler 3 Open
Metaphysics
PHIL S3601D 3 points.

This course will survey topics in contemporary metaphysics. We will focus on material objects, time, modality, causation, properties, and natural kinds. We will begin by considering what objects there are in general (ontology) and what to say about certain puzzling entities (such as holes). Then we will turn to debates about material objects and puzzles about composite objects and the notion of parthood. Next is the issue of how material objects persist over time and survive change in their parts. We shall consider two important views on persistence. We then turn to two issues related to persistence: personal identity over time, and puzzles about time travel. This will lead us into the next part of the course on modality and causation, which concerns the notions of possibility, necessity, laws of nature, and causation. We will consider different views about "possible worlds". We will then consider the nature of laws and causation and then turn to the problem of free will. We will look at debates in the metaphysics of properties between realists and nominalists about properties. Then we'll consider causal powers, dispositions, and natural kinds. The section will conclude with problems about the metaphysics of socially constructed kinds such as race or gender.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3601 001/65659 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
716 PHILOSOPHY HALL
Matthew Heeney 3 Open
Music and the Indigenous Experience in North America
MUSI S2400D 3 points.

What is "music" for Native American communities? How is meaning in indigenous music/sound generated? What has the creation, performance, and experience of listening to indigenous or indigenously created musics done for both Native and Settler/Immigrant communities in America? In this course we will develop foundational skills for listening to and contextualizing the music of indigenous peoples, and we will explore what scholars, activists and other authors have said about indigenous musical practices and creativity. While this course is listening-intensive, it will also draw upon literature in musicology/ethnomusicology, Native American studies, anthropology, performance studies, philosophy, and especially the intellectual work of indigenous peoples themselves. We will also pay particular attention to indigenous music happening in and around New York City.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
New York Theatre Event: Off Broadway
THEA S4215D 3 points.

In this course students explore the elements involved in the creation of theatre today in the historic heart of American theatre: New York City. The core elements of theatrical craft are discussed: playwriting, directing, acting, design and producing. Aspects of New York theatrical history complement these discussions by exploring the roots and traditions of theatrical practice. While a variety of theatrical forms and styles are explored, this course is rooted in contemporary dramatic texts. Each week students attend a live performance at various venues throughout the city in order to gain insight into the ways that theatre truly becomes a New York event.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
THEA 4215 001/76221 M W 7:00p - 10:00p
605 DODGE BUILDING
Christopher Burney 3 Open
NGOs and the Human Rights Movement: Strategies, Successes and Challenges
HRTS S4215D 3 points.

The human rights movement is one of the most successful social justice movements of our time, establishing universal principles that govern how states should treat citizens and non-citizens. The movement strengthens, and is strengthened by, a complex web of institutions, laws, and norms that constitute a functioning global system that builds on itself progressively, animated by strong NGOs. The course will address the evolution of the international human rights movement and on the NGOs that drive the movement on the international, regional and domestic levels. Sessions will highlight the experiences of major human rights NGOs and will address topics including strategy development, institutional representation, research methodologies, partnerships, networks, venues of engagement, campaigning, fundraising and, perhaps most importantly, the fraught and complex debates about adaptation to changing global circumstances.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 4215 001/75005 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
309 HAMILTON HALL
Louis Bickford 3 Open
Nonfiction Writing Workshop
WRIT S1101D 3 points.

The Nonfiction Writing Workshop is designed for students new to the practice of such genres as reportage, criticism, biography and memoir. Various techniques are explored through exercises and other assignments. Critique of student work is supplemented by outside readings.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1101 001/18740 M W 6:15p - 9:25p
409 DODGE BUILDING
Ariel Goldberg 3 Open
Ordinary Differential Equations
MATH S3027D 3 points.

Equations of order one, linear equations, series solutions at regular and singular points. Boundary value problems. Selected applications.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 3027 001/11391 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:20p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Karsten Gimre 3 Open
Organic Chemistry I (Lecture)
CHEM S2443D 4 points.

Principles of organic chemistry. The structure and reactivity of organic molecules from the standpoint of modern theories of chemistry. Stereochemistry, reactions of organic molecules, mechanisms of organic reactions, syntheses and degradations of organic molecules, spectroscopic techniques of structure determination. Please note that students must attend a recitation for this class. Students who wish to take the full organic chemistry lecture sequence and laboratory should also register for CHEM S2444Q Organic Chemistry II Lecture and CHEM S2543Q Organic Chemistry Lab (see below). This course is equivalent to CHEM W2443 Organic Chemistry I Lecture.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 2443 001/60830 M Tu W Th 10:35a - 12:20p
209 HAVEMEYER HALL
Talha Siddiqui 4 Open
Organizing Innovation
SOCI S3675D 3 points.

This course will explore the tensions between creativity and control, and structure and agency, in organizations engaged in the development of innovative ideas. What is innovation? How does it emerge and diffuse? How might organizations support or hinder the development of novel ideas? What role does technology play in the pursuit of innovation? We will apply a critical lens to the organization of innovation, recognizing that innovation-although a popular buzzword in the business world-implies a variety of outcomes that may solve previously intractable problems on the one hand, but may have unintended social consequences on the other. The goals of the course are to provide students with a broad overview of the existing literature on the sociology of innovation at both the macro- and micro-level and to support students in future careers in management, engineering, academia, or any field that involves the organization of groups of individuals toward creative ends.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3675 001/68942 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
318 HAMILTON HALL
Moran Levy 3 Open
Painting I
VIAR S3210D 3 points.

This is an intensive, six-week class moving from the basics of paint materials, techniques, issues of color, light, narrative and most of all representation. Students will begin working from still life set-ups in the studio and gradually move towards more ambitious approaches including figure painting from a model. Towards the end of the class students will be encouraged to work on a project or projects that more closely reflect their personal ideas.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3210 001/16690 Tu W Th 5:30p - 8:00p
401 DODGE BUILDING
Samantha Nye 3 Limited Availability
Poetry Writing Workshop
WRIT S1201D 3 points.

The Poetry Writing Workshop is designed for all students with a serious interest in poetry writing, from those who lack significant workshop experience or training in the craft of poetry to seasoned workshop participants looking for new challenges and perspectives on their work. Students will be assigned writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, collage, and others. Students will also read an variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1201 001/26435 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
409 DODGE BUILDING
Shane McCrae 3 Open
Political Theory I
POLS S1101D 4 points.

What is a just society? What is a good life? How should we live together when we disagree about justice and the good life?  Is government essential to living well? What is the best form of government? What rights do we have? How, if at all, can the coercive power of the state be justified?  These are some of the enduring questions we will explore.  A major goal of the course is to exercise techniques needed to understand a political thinker’s arguments and to construct one’s own.  

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1101 001/77768 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
711 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Luke MacInnis 4 Limited Availability
Post- 1945 American Literature
ENGL S4605D 3 points.

This course surveys major works of American fiction, poetry, essays, literary and cultural criticism written since 1945. It will situate the analysis of literature against a historical backdrop that includes such key events as the Holocaust; the atomic bomb; the Beatniks; youth counterculture; the women’s, peace, and Civil Rights movements; the Korean, Vietnam, and Gulf Wars; the energy crisis; globalization; the rise of the internet; and the War on Terror.  We will also consider major literary and artistic movements such as postmodernism, the Beats, confessional poetry, minimalism, the New Journalism, and historiographic metafiction.  Lectures will emphasize literature in its cultural/historical context, but will also attend to its formal/aesthetic properties.  

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4605 001/66459 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
612 PHILOSOPHY HALL
Rachel Adams 3 Open
Preparation for College Chemistry
CHEM S0001D 0 points.

This course is preparation for CHEM UN1403 General Chemistry I Lecture or the equivalent, as well as for other science courses. It is intended for students who have not attended school for sometime or who do not have a firm grasp of high school chemistry. Topics include inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, chemical bonding and its relation to molecular structure, stoichiometry, periodic properties of elements, chemical equilibrium, gas laws, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. Please note that students must attend a recitation section.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 0001 001/14657 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
209 HAVEMEYER HALL
Luis Avila 0 Open
Printmaking Intensive
VIAR S4106D 6 points.

The Advanced Printmaking intensive focuses on teaching students new and traditional printmaking techniques and developing skills on all levels. Students and professionals have access to all printmaking processes and equipment but will focus on a primary area of interest. Throughout the course, students have the opportunity to visit artists' studios and view prints in exclusive print study rooms at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York Public Library, and the Museum of Modern Art. Participants are also exposed to the inner workings of the LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies publishing operation at Columbia University. The course gives participants the opportunity to learn the processes of photogravure, etching, relief, laser engraving and screenprinting by working with established contemporary artists and master printers. This is a studio program based on a variety of different models: the European model of apprenticeship/guild programs to learn techniques and the standard professional printshop model. We also incorporate the MFA model of critique and discussion. There is substantial independent work beyond the program hours, as we expect each student to use the demos to develop their own process and body of work.

,

See more information here: https://arts.columbia.edu/summer/course/printmaking-intensive

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 4106 001/75422 M Tu W Th F 10:00a - 6:00p
210 DODGE BUILDING
Tomas Vu Daniel 6 Open
Printmaking: Silkscreen
VIAR S3411D 3 points.

Introduction to the fundamentals of silkscreen techniques. Students gain familiarity with the technical processes of silkscreen and are encouraged to use the processes to develop their visual language. Students are involved in a great deal of drawing for assigned projects. Portfolio required at end.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3411 001/63684 Tu Th 6:00p - 9:00p
210 DODGE BUILDING
Carolyn Hulbert 3 Limited Availability
VIAR 3411 002/29030 M W 6:00p - 9:00p
212 DODGE BUILDING
Aurelien Couput 3 Open
Probability
STAT S4203D 3 points.

This course can be taken as a single course for students requiring knowledge of probability or as a foundation for more advanced courses. It is open to both undergraduate and master students. This course satisfies the prerequisite for STAT W3107 and W4107. Topics covered include combinatorics, conditional probability, random variables and common distributions, expectation, independence, Bayes' rule, joint distributions, conditional expectations, moment generating functions, central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, characteristic functions.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4203 001/28033 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
903 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Young Kim 3 Open
Race, Crime, and Law
SOCI S3218D 3 points.

This course critically examines the interplay between crime, law, and the administration of justice in the United States and how these issues are shaped by larger societal factors. Students will receive a theoretical and empirical overview of the American legal and criminal justice system, emphasizing such issues as: the function and purpose of crime control; the roles of the actors/subjects of the criminal justice system; crime and violence as cultural and political issues in America; racial disparities in offending and criminal justice processing; and juvenile justice.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3218 001/17906 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
318 HAMILTON HALL
Brittany Fox-Williams 3 Open
Rapid Reading and Translation
FREN S2106D 3 points.

Primarily for graduate students in other departments who have some background in French and who wish to meet the French reading requirement for the Ph.D. degree, or for scholars whose research involves references in the French language. Intensive reading and translation, both prepared and at sight, in works drawn from literature, criticism, philosophy, and history. Brief review of grammar; vocabulary exercises.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 2106 001/64900 Tu W Th 3:00p - 5:05p
407 HAMILTON HALL
Celia Abele 3 Open
Recorded Sound
MUSI S3630D 3 points.

Main objective is to gain a familiarity with and understanding of recording, editing, mixing, and mastering of recorded music and sounds using Pro Tools software. Discusses the history of recorded production, microphone technique, and the idea of using the studio as an instrument for the production and manipulation of sound.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 3630 001/77020 Mario Diaz de Leon 3 Limited Availability
Salsa Soca Reggae
MUSI S2020D 3 points.

Salsa Soca Reggae is an introduction to Caribbean popular music that surveys music from 1800 to the present. The course focuses on the cultural and social history of the music and traces its influence on global cultural and musical expression.  

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MUSI 2020 001/93646 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
620 DODGE BUILDING
Christopher Washburne 3 Limited Availability
Screenwriting I: Introduction to Screenwriting
FILM S4037D 3 points.

Modern feature-length screenplays demand a specific architecture. In this class students will enter with an idea for a film, and during the first eight sessions build a coherent treatment; that is, a summary of the events and major emotional arcs of the film's three acts. In the final four sessions students will begin and complete the first act of their feature-length screenplay.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4037 001/66493 M W 10:00a - 1:00p
512 DODGE BUILDING
Loren-Paul Caplin 3 Open
Social and Political Philosophy
PHIL S3751D 3 points.

Six major concepts of political philosophy including authority, rights, equality, justice, liberty and democracy are examined in three different ways. First the conceptual issues are analyzed through contemporary essays on these topics by authors like Peters, Hart, Williams, Berlin, Rawls and Schumpeter. Second the classical sources on these topics are discussed through readings from Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Marx, Plato, Mill and Rousseau. Third some attention is paid to relevant contexts of application of these concepts in political society, including such political movements as anarchism, international human rights, conservative, liberal, and Marxist economic policies as well as competing models of democracy.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3751 001/13406 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
716 PHILOSOPHY HALL
Cesar Cabezas Gamarra 3 Open
Statistical Computing and Introduction to Data Science
STAT S5206D 3 points.

Open to MA students in Statistics only


Introduction to programming in the R statistical package: functions, objects, data structures, flow control, input and output, debugging, logical design, and abstraction.  Writing code for numerical and graphical statistical analyses.  Writing maintainable code and testing, stochastic simulations, paralleizing data analyses, and working with large data sets.  Examples from data science will be used for demonstration.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 5206 001/21546 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
203 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Linxi Liu 3 Open
Statistical Computing and Introduction to Data Science
STAT S4206D 3 points.

Open to CC, CN, GS, GN, BC, EN, GSAS, GSAS Liberal, and SEAS Graduate Students


Introduction to programming in the R statistical package: functions, objects, data structures, flow control, input and output, debugging, logical design, and abstraction.  Writing code for numerical and graphical statistical analyses.  Writing maintainable code and testing, stochastic simulations, paralleizing data analyses, and working with large data sets.  Examples from data science will be used for demonstration.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4206 001/19122 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
203 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Linxi Liu 3 Open
Statistical Computing in SAS
STAT S4199D 3 points.

Data handling in SAS (including SAS INPUT, reading and writing raw and system files, data set subsetting, concatenating, merging, updating and working with arrays), SAS MACROS, common SAS functions, and graphics in SAS. Review of SAS tools for exploratory data analysis, and common statistical procedures (including, categorical data, dates and longitudinal data, correlation and regression, nonparametric comparisons, ANOVA, multiple regression, multivariate data analysis).

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4199 001/71374 M Tu W Th 2:45p - 4:20p
252 ENGINEERING TERRACE
Anthony Donoghue 3 Open
Statistical Machine Learning
STAT S4241D 3 points.

The course will provide an introduction to Machine Learning and its core models and algorithms. The aim of the course is to provide students of statistics with detailed knowledge of how Machine Learning methods work and how statistical models can be brought to bear in computer systems - not only to analyze large data sets, but to let computers perform tasks that traditional methods of computer science are unable to address. Examples range from speech recognition and text analysis through bioinformatics and medical diagnosis. This course provides a first introduction to the statistical methods and mathematical concepts which make such technologies possible.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4241 001/70158 M Tu W Th 2:45p - 4:20p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Gabriel Young 3 Open
Statistical Methods for Finance
STAT S5261D 3 points.

Open to MA students in Statistics only


A fast-paced introduction to statistical methods used in quantitative finance. Financial applications and statistical methodologies are intertwined in all lectures. Topics include regression analysis and applications to the Capital Asset Pricing Model and multifactor pricing models, principal components and multivariate analysis, smoothing techniques and estimation of yield curves statistical methods for financial time series, value at risk, term structure models and fixed income research, and estimation and modeling of volatilities. Hands-on experience with financial data.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 5261 001/68967 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
312 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Pawel Polak 3 Open
Statistical Methods for Finance
STAT S4261D 3 points.

A fast-paced introduction to statistical methods used in quantitative finance. Financial applications and statistical methodologies are intertwined in all lectures. Topics include regression analysis and applications to the Capital Asset Pricing Model and multifactor pricing models, principal components and multivariate analysis, smoothing techniques and estimation of yield curves statistical methods for financial time series, value at risk, term structure models and fixed income research, and estimation and modeling of volatilities. Hands-on experience with financial data.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4261 001/26817 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
312 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Pawel Polak 3 Open
Television Writing Intensive- Non Credit
FILM S0431D 0 points.

International Students are not eligible for this course, as it does not provide academic credit. The TV Writing Intensive is a six-week, concentrated and encompassing introduction into the field of television writing designed to prepare students to join the professional worlds of half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas across network, cable and digital platforms. In an interconnected program consisting of two intensive writing workshops and a lecture series with guest writers and producers, students gain the knowledge and authority to explore, examine and create the kind of groundbreaking work that is taking over television here and around the world. Participants in The Television Writing Intensive learn about half-hour comedy and one-hour drama by writing and developing spec scripts and original pilots.  A spec script is a teleplay for an existing show where the writer brings original stories to existing characters.  A pilot is a script written for an original series that the writer creates. This intensive course meets 15 hours per week. On Mondays and Wednesdays students will attend the writing courses outlined above. Thursday evenings students will attend seminars with professors and other industry professionals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 0431 001/24367 M W 10:00a - 1:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
M W 2:00p - 5:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
Th 7:00p - 10:00p
511 DODGE BUILDING
Joseph Cacaci 0 Open
Terrorism and Counterterrorism
INAF S6387D 3 points.

This course examines the origins and evolution of modern terrorism, the challenges posed by terrorist groups to states and to the international system, and strategies employed to confront and combat terrorism. We assess a wide variety of terrorist organizations, and explore the psychological, socioeconomic, political, and religious causes of terrorist violence past and present. We also analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various counterterrorism strategies, from the point of view of efficacy as well as ethics, and look into ways in which the new threat of global terrorism might impact the healthy functioning of democratic states.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6387 001/66116 Tu Th 2:00p - 5:10p
324 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Stuart Gottlieb 3 Open
The American Presidency
POLS S4316D 3 points.

The growth of presidential power, the creation and use of the institutionalized presidency, presidential-congressional and presidential-bureaucratic relationships, and the presidency and the national security apparatus.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4316 001/10179 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
711 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Richard Pious 3 Open
The Art of the Essay
ENGL S3915D 3 points.

“Learned we may be with another man's learning: we can only be wise with wisdom of our own.”

Michel de Montaigne


 “There is something you find interesting, for a reason hard to explain. It is hard to explain because you have never read it on any page; there you begin. You were made and set here to give voice to this, your own astonishment.” Annie Dillard, The Writing Life 


“Find a subject you care about and which in your heart you feel others should care about. It is this genuine caring, not your games with language, which will be the most compelling and seductive element in your style.” Kurt Vonnegut


What makes the essay of personal experience an essay rather than a journal entry? How can one's specific experience transcend the limits of narrative and transmit a deeper meaning to any reader? How can a writer transmit the wisdom gained from personal experience without lecturing her reader? In The Art of the Essay, we explore the answers to these questions by reading personal essays in a variety of different forms. We begin with Michel de Montaigne, the 16th-century philosopher who popularized the personal essay as we know it and famously asked, “What do I know?,” and follow the development of the form as a locus of rigorous self-examination, doubt, persuasion, and provocation. Through close reading of a range of essays from writers including Annie Dillard, Salman Rushdie, Jamaica Kincaid, and June Jordan, we analyze how voice, form, and evidence work together to create a world of meaning around an author's experience, one that invites readers into conversations that are at once deeply personal and universal in their consequences and implications. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3915 001/71896 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
707 HAMILTON HALL
Wendy Schor-Haim 3 Open
The History of Philosophy, II: Aquinas through Kant
PHIL S2201D 3 points.

PHIL UN2101 is not a prerequisite for this course. Exposition and analysis of central philosophical problems as discussed by innovative thinkers from Aquinas through Kant. Authors include figures like Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Spinoza, Anne Conway, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, Émilie du Châtelet, and Kant.

,


Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2201 001/23533 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
716 PHILOSOPHY HALL
Sebastien Rivat 3 Open
The Interpretation of Culture
ANTH S1002D 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1002 001/14258 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Maxine Weisgrau 3 Open
The Life Aquatic
EEEB S1115D 3 points.

Water covers the majority of the earth’s surface but what of the life in these waters? Rivers, wetlands, lakes, estuaries and oceans provide habitat for an extraordinary diversity of animals. This course explores the amazing array of aquatic animals that occupy both freshwater and marine ecosystems as well as the natural and human activities that impact their survival. No previous knowledge of science is assumed. Fulfills the science requirement for most Columbia and GS undergraduates. ​Field trip:  Date TBD. Students pay for public transportation.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1115 001/22352 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Alicia Mihnovets 3 Open
The Psychology of Stereotyping & Prejudice
PSYC S3610D 3 points.

A review of current research on intergroup perceptions, attitudes, and behavior. Emphasis on cognitive processes underlying stereotyping and prejudice.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3610 001/10991 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Nadav Antebi-Gruszka 3 Open
The Science of Psychology
PSYC S1001D 4 points.

Introduction to the science of human behavior. Topics include history of psychology, brain function and development, sleep and dreams, sensation and perception, learning and memory, theories of development, language and cognition, research methods, emotion, mental illness, and therapy.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1001 001/13423 M Tu W Th 1:00p - 3:05p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Tina Kao 4 Open
The Television Writing Intensive
FILM S3040D 6 points.

The TV Writing Intensive is a six-week, concentrated and encompassing introduction into the field of television writing designed to prepare students to join the professional worlds of half-hour comedies and one-hour dramas across network, cable and digital platforms. In an interconnected program consisting of two intensive writing workshops and a lecture series with guest writers and producers, students gain the knowledge and authority to explore, examine and create the kind of groundbreaking work that is taking over television here and around the world. Participants in The Television Writing Intensive learn about half-hour comedy and one-hour drama by writing and developing spec scripts and original pilots.  A spec script is a teleplay for an existing show where the writer brings original stories to existing characters.  A pilot is a script written for an original series that the writer creates. This intensive course meets 15 hours per week. On Mondays and Wednesdays students will attend the writing courses outlined above.  Thursday evenings students will attend seminars with professors and other industry professionals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3040 001/21904 M W 10:00a - 1:00p
508 DODGE BUILDING
M W 2:00p - 5:00p
508 DODGE BUILDING
Th 7:00p - 10:00p
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Joseph Cacaci 6 Open
The United Nations and the Challenges of Peace building
INAF S6554D 3 points.

It is now a well known fact that countries embroiled in conflict seldom emerge from it "once and for all." They tend to relapse back into conflict within months or years. The reasons are also well-known: low education and high poverty levels, weak or non- existent institutions, poor governance, exclusion and marginalization of certain groups including women and poor economic prospects certainly in livelihoods. And yet Peace building in the international context is a relatively new concept. It appeared in the in the UN lexicon in the 1980s and has evolved as a normative concept since. Peace building is complex and multi-faceted encompassing security, human rights, development and reconciliation of past differences and ultimately societal transformation. It is before everything else a political exercise. This course will ask: How is Peace building done, who are the actors and stakeholders? What lessons have we learnt since the 1980s? What does it take to build the peace? The course will give an understanding of the evolution of the norm of peace building at the United Nations and discuss the new UN Peace building architecture. Ten years after its creation, has the Peace Building Commission made a difference and why? What have been its challenges? It will look at the many stakeholders on the ground and discuss the issue of coordination and the need for integrated strategies. It will provide examples of countries that have succeeded, analyze the root causes of the conflicts and the tools which were used. It will extract the lessons learned and the conditions for peace building to succeed.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6554 001/18270 M W 2:00p - 5:10p
405A INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
JAMES WILLIAM RAWLEY 3 Open
The United Nations and the Maintenance of International Peace and Security
INAF S6559D 3 points.

This past year marked the seventieth anniversary of the United Nations (UN) and the year when a new Secretary-General will be selected by the Security Council to succeed Ban Ki Moon. At this critical juncture, the international system is being challenged to provide adequate responses to the rise of violent extremist groups, waves of refugees arriving in Europe, and to -­â€ fewer but deadlier -­armed conflicts. As prevention continues to be elusive and recent - mostly intrastate -­armed conflicts have proven to be particularly resistant to peaceful settlement whether through mediation, the deployment of peace operations or peacebuilding projects, the question of the relevance of the UN is posed yet again. Has the Security Council been successful in using the tools at its disposal, from prevention to peace operations and enforcement measures? What has become of the Responsibility to Protect? Is a divided Security Council facing a crisis of relevance? What does it mean for peace operations sent where there is no peace to keep? What are the persisting obstacles to effective prevention? What are the lessons from the evolving partnership with regional organizations? How can peace be sustained over the long term? What will have been Ban Ki Moon's legacy? What are the prospects for UN reform and what could it look like? To address these questions and more, the course will examine the evolving role of the world organization in global security, shaped by its member states with different strategic interests and by the broader geopolitical context in which it operates.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6559 001/69307 M W 5:00p - 8:10p
501 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Jeremy Boutellis 3 Open
Time Series Analysis
STAT S4221D 3 points.

Prerequisites: STAT GU4205 or the equivalent. Least squares smoothing and prediction, linear systems, Fourier analysis, and spectral estimation. Impulse response and transfer function. Fourier series, the fast Fourier transform, autocorrelation function, and spectral density. Univariate Box-Jenkins modeling and forecasting. Emphasis on applications. Examples from the physical sciences, social sciences, and business. Computing is an integral part of the course.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4221 001/10210 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
222 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Abolfazal Safikhani 3 Open
Toni Morrison and Octavia Butler
ENGL S3237D 3 points.
“My work requires me to think about how free I can be as an African-American woman writer in my genderized, sexualized, wholly racialized world.” —Toni Morrison
“[Science fiction] is potentially the freest genre in existence.” — Octavia Butler
Toni Morrison and Octavia Butler are two of the foremost Black women’s fiction writers of the latter half of the twentieth-century. In their novels, Morrison and Butler both address questions of race, gender, history, and inequality. Both eventually received critical acclaim, with Morrison winning the Nobel Prize in 1992 and Butler winning the MacArthur “Genius” Grant in 1995, and both have authored novels that reckon with the historical legacy of slavery in the present day.
The two are also a study in contrasts: whereas Morrison specialized in prestigious literary fiction, Butler was classified for most of her career as a writer of pulpy Sci-Fi. Morrison began her career in publishing and then became a writer-in-residence at Princeton. Butler struggled to earn a living for much of her career, initially working temporary jobs in factories and warehouses. While an editor at Random House, Morrison even rejected a manuscript of Butler’s. Morrison sees herself as exploring the condition of Black women in America, while Butler claims: “Do I want to say something central about race? Aside from, ‘Hey we’re here!’?”
Both writers defy categorization. Octavia Butler is known as a writer of science fiction, butKindredcan easily be read as a realist, historical novel. Toni Morrison became famous for her historical fiction, butSong of SolomonandBelovedboth flirt with the supernatural. Over the course of the semester, we’ll think about how where their ideas and sensibilities align and where they diverge. We’ll read the remarkable works of these two women as we think about questions like: What kind of freedom did they believe was possible for Black women in twentieth-century America? Is fiction a space of freedom or of constraint? How does each of these writers think about her craft as an artist? Is there a meaningful difference between science fiction and realist fiction?
Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3237 001/71288 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
402 HAMILTON HALL
Palmer Rampell 3 Open
Topics in Computer Science: Methods in Unsupervised Learning
COMS S4995D 3 points.

Prerequisites: Machine Learning (COMS 4771) or equivalent. Topics from unsupervised learning such as clustering and dimensionality reduction will be studied in detail. Topics in clustering: k-means clustering, hierarchical clustering, spectral clustering, clustering with various forms of feedback, good initialization techniques and convergence analysis of various clustering procedures. Topics in dimensionality reduction: linear techniques such as PCA, ICA, Factor Analysis, Random Projections, non-linear techniques such as LLE, IsoMap, Laplacian Eigenmaps, tSNE, and study of embeddings of general metric spaces, what sorts of theoretical guarantees can one provide about such techniques. Miscellaneous topics: design of datastructures for fast Nearest Neighbor search such as Cover Trees and LSH. Algorithms will be implemented in either Matlab or Python. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 4995 001/14172 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
627 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Nakul Verma 3 Open
Topics in International Security
POLS S3680D 3 points.

This course explores how and why states and non-state actors use violent and non-violent strategies in international politics. While not all topics in international security can be covered thoroughly in one semester, this course will give a sampling of many of the topics, including military doctrines and strategies, diplomatic policies, social forces, civil wars, and roles of individuals. Though historical and current events will be used as examples to illustrate how various theories work, students should keep in mind that this is not a course on current events.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3680 001/19091 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
711 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Brian Blankenship 3 Limited Availability
Transitional Justice in the United States: Reckoning with Legacies of Racial Injustice
HRTS S4740D 3 points.

This seminar will include a theoretical exploration of transitional justice as well as key challenges and possibilities in its application. It will begin with a reflection on what it means to be a practitioner in the area of transitional justice or human rights. Critical self-reflection will be encouraged as well as a review of power, equity, and process. Students will learn about the field of transitional justice, including its guiding principles, key approaches, and critiques. Once a foundational understanding of transitional justice has been established, this seminar will explore legacies of injustice in the US, with a focus on the legacy of slavery, and seek to apply transitional justice approaches to these legacies. Students will be encouraged to think critically about whether transitional justice approaches can help address legacies of injustice in the US, to what extent those approaches need to be adapted to the specific time and context of the US, and whether different approaches are required altogether. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 4740 001/12346 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
402 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Virginie Ladisch 3 Open
Travel Writing
WRIT S4320D 3 points.

How does the traveler become the travel writer?  What makes good travel writing? Why does it matter today? This course examines and breaks down the very specific craft of travel writing. Simply because we like to travel, does it qualify us to write about it? Everywhere has been written about, so how do we find something fresh to say about… Paris, or even Patagonia?   In this course, we both dispel, and prove, some of the myths of travel writing. Students learn to find an angle in order to uncover destinations anew and make them personal— it’s in the personal that the universal is revealed.   From crafting a compelling lede and understanding the need for a strong “nut graph,” to knowing the value of dialogue in propelling the story forward, and then finding the ideal kicker to send the reader away satisfied, students dissect published stories and are sent out into “the field” (of New York City) to craft their own. Travel writing is more than, “I went here, I did this, I ate that.” From front-of-book and service pieces, to destination features, we discuss magazine and newspaper travel writing in depth, as well as touch on longer form travel writing. Finally, through exercises and assignments, students learn to craft a compelling pitch in order to approach editors.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4320 001/76238 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
411 DODGE BUILDING
Porter Fox 3 Open
Voting and American Politics
POLS S3290D 3 points.

Elections and public opinion; history of U.S. electoral politics; the problem of voter participation; partisanship and voting; accounting for voting decisions; explaining and forecasting election outcomes; elections and divided government; money and elections; electoral politics and representative democracy.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3290 001/71343 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
703 HAMILTON HALL
Michael Miller 3 Open
World Cinema: Mexico
FILM S2295D 3 points.

The global success of film directors Alejandro González Iñárritu, Alfonso Cuarón, and Guillermo del Toro has attracted much attention to the New Mexican Cinema. Yet this «Nuevo cine mexicano» cannot be understood without knowing the traditions of Mexico’s intricate film history. This course explores the numerous tendencies of Mexican cinema through the analysis of its most representative genres, features, and directors since the so called Golden Age (1938-1957). An in-depth analysis of films such as Emilio Fernández’s María Candelaria (1943), Luis Buñuel’s Los olvidados (1950), Jomi García Ascot’s On the Empty Balcony (1962), Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Mole (1970), and Arturo Ripstein's Deep Crimson (1996) will contribute to define the characteristics of the most relevant «national» genres – from 1940s melodramas to 1970s acid Westerns and 1990s crime films. The study of the New Mexican Cinema of Iñárritu (Amores perros, 2000), Cuarón (Y tu mamá también, 2001), and del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, 2006) will also comprise an examination of the complex relationship between the US and Mexican film industries, as well as a critique of the very notion of «national identity» in today’s globalized world. We will also analyze new tendencies in commercial, experimental, and documentary Mexican films – including Carlos Reygadas' Silent Light (2007) and Pedro González Rubio's Alamar (2009). CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 2295 001/65246 Tu Th 9:00a - 1:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
Breixo Viejo Vinas 3 Limited Availability
Writing Children's Books
WRIT S4313D 3 points.

There are many misconceptions as to what makes an appealing story for children and how to get a story published. Many novice writers are simply relating an incident as opposed to creating a story. This course will show beginner and experienced writers how to mine their lives and imaginations for ideas and how to develop those ideas into children's stories-a step by step process from inspiration to finished manuscript for picture books, early readers, emerging readers and chapter books. Students will also learn the importance of reading their writing out loud-a process that helps both reader and listener develop a better ear for the story's pace, cadence and structure. Writing for children has become incredibly popular in the past fifteen years and publishing houses have been inundated with manuscripts. Many houses have ceased accepting unsolicited manuscripts all together. This course will disclose other avenues to getting your manuscript into the hands of agents and editors.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4313 001/16290 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
411 DODGE BUILDING
Peter Catalanotto 3 Open
Accelerated Elementary Reading, I and II
GERM S1115Q 4 points.

Equivalent to GERM F1113-F1114. This accelerated survey of German grammar, reading techniques, and dictionary skills is designed primarily for graduate students preparing for reading proficiency exams or wishing to do research in German-language literature. Extensive exercises in translation, reading for general comprehension, and specialized reading are based on texts drawn from the students' fields of study. Although this course does not satisfy any part of the foreign language requirement for degree candidates, successful completion of the translation on the final exam fulfills the German reading proficiency requirement in most graduate programs.Students are advised that this course is a full-time commitment. Students should expect to study 2 hours every day for every hour spent in the classroom and additional time on weekends.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 1115 002/11826 M Tu W Th 10:05a - 12:00p
313 HAMILTON HALL
Neil Ziolkowski 4 Open
American Literature and Culture: Walt Whitman and New York
ENGL S3273Q 3 points.

Walt Whitman was not the first to write about New York.  But he was the first of many to let New York write him.  By age 43, Whitman had composed most of his best poetry, published three editions of Leaves of Grass, and left New York only twice. How did the second son of an unsuccessful farmer, a grammar school dropout and hack writer become America’s greatest poet?  This course offers a response to this perennial mystery of literary scholarship by proposing that “Walt Whitman, a kosmos, of Manhattan the son” was indeed a product of his environment.  Coming of age as a writer at the same time the city was emerging as a great metropolis, he received his education and inspiration from New York itself.  Course time is equally divided between discussions of Whitman’s antebellum poetry, journalism, and prose (including the newly recovered Life and Adventures of Jack Engle) in their cultural and geographical contexts, and on-site explorations that retread Whitman’s footsteps through Brooklyn and his beloved Mannahatta.  Experiential learning is further encouraged through assignments based in archives, museums, and at historic sites throughout the city.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3273 001/77419 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
401 HAMILTON HALL
Karen Karbiener 3 Open
An Introduction to Animal Behavior Through Fieldwork
EEEB S3015Q 3 points.

Using evolutionary principles as the unifying theme, we will survey the study of animal behavior, including the history, basic principles and research methods.   Fieldwork is a significant component of this course and through observations at the World Wildlife Conservation Park (Bronx Zoo) and in the urban environment of New York, students will gain familiarity with the scientific method, behavioral observation and research design. Although this is listed as a 3000-level course, no prior biology experience is required. Fulfills the science requirement for most Columbia and GS undergraduates. Field trip: TBD, most probably trip to zoo—during class time; students pay for public transportation

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 3015 001/25184 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Shahrina Chowdhury 3 Open
Animation Film History
FILM S4220Q 3 points.

From Émile Cohl to the Fleischer brothers, and from Studio Ghibli to Bob’s Burgers, this course will explore the histories, styles, and theories of animation film. We will start by tackling what constitutes “animation” and how this format has changed into “animation film,” over the course of several centuries, with roots in shadow theatre, magic, and a slew of optical media that rose to the occasion in the 19th century - from thaumatrope to zoetrope and beyond. We will look at the different techniques, styles, and media that artists experimented with in the early-20th century and that came to stick for the decades to come. This will provide you with a primer, working knowledge of the jargon, and will help you recognize cut-outs, cel animation, rotoscoping, stop-motion, CGI, and much more. From the Fleischer brothers to the Warner brothers and Walt Disney, we will explore the history of America’s animated golden age in the 1930s and 1940s. In Europe and the U.S.S.R., we will delve into the rich traditions of puppet animation from Wladyslaw Starewicz to Jan Svankmajer and from Aardman to the Quay brothers. You will get to know the cultural specifics of Japanese animation (or “anime”) and we will track its history with a postwar focus on Osamu Tezuka, Satoshi Kon, Mamoru Oshii, Studio Ghibli directors, and Makoto Shinkai. In our final week, we will look at the 1980s rise and ever growing popularity of the animated sitcom, from The Flintstones to The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist to BoJack Horseman. We will additionally consider topics such as the interplay between live action and animation, the exchange between Japanese and American traditions, and the evolution of the medium into an art of its own. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4220 001/28346 Tu Th 9:00a - 1:00p
507 DODGE BUILDING
Vito Adriaensens 3 Open
Anthropology of the Body
ANTH S3965Q 3 points.

The productive unease in critical theory occasioned by the body as the ambivalent ground of both subjugation and emancipatory transformation has resulted in debates over the link between corporeality and symbolic representations, discourse formations and disciplinary practices and ultimately, between nature and its others: culture, history, and society. This course promises to raise discussion to a level where political issues concerning the body can be reevaluated through a rigorous rethinking of the radical shifts in the status of the body as both subject and object of economic, technological, and cultural processes under globalized capital. Approaching ethnographic and historical materials concerning violence and healing, discipline and labor, machinery and embodiment, affects and resistance in terms of the ontological claims they presuppose or make in relation to philosophies of the body, this course has the distinctive aim of demonstrating how histories of the body are co-implicated with histories of gender, race, class, sexuality, (post)coloniality, capital, science and technology, and mass mediation. Contesting the opposition between objectivism and subjectivism, it will pose a broader set of questions concerning power, agency, and language in order to elaborate a politics of corporeality.      

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3965 001/77002 Tu Th 12:00p - 3:10p
402 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Steven Alley 3 Open
Baroque Masters at the Met: Bernini, Velazquez, Rembrandt
AHIS S2314Q 3 points.

This course examines three masters of European Baroque art—Gianlorenzo Bernini (1598-1680), Diego Velázquez (1599-1660), and Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669)—artists who are all well represented in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through classroom discussions and museum visits, we will examine Baroque art as part of a continuing and developing accumulation of forms and ideas throughout the 17th century, and consider the impact these artists had on their contemporaries and in ensuing centuries. Roughly half of the class sessions take place at the Metropolitan Museum, a luxury that allows for close, firsthand analysis of art, but it is not an art appreciation course. It is a history course concerned with a study of ideas, artists, and visual facts and their application to emerging art forms within their cultural-historical context. In addition to developing a critical eye, the class is intended to develop analytical thinking and communication skills as well as knowledge of the subject matter.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 2314 001/19691 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
832 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Lindsey Schneider 3 Limited Availability
Basic Drawing
VIAR S1001Q 3 points.

Fundamentals of visual vocabulary. Students work from observation using still-life objects and the human figure. Emphasizes the relationship of lines and forms to each other and to the picture format. Materials used: vine charcoal, compressed charcoal, pencil, pen, ink, and brushes. Class assignments, discussions, and critiques.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 1001 001/15838 Tu W Th 5:30p - 8:00p
501 DODGE BUILDING
Elizabeth Ahn 3 Limited Availability
Basic Physics
PHYS S0065Q 0 points.

Basic Physics serves as preparation for General Physics 1201-1202 and is intended for those students who do not have a solid foundation in high school physics or who have been away from school for several years. The course will provide an introduction to the basic concepts and fundamental laws of physics, focusing on mechanics, together with a review of the mathematical techniques needed for problem-solving.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 0065 001/10175 Tu Th 4:30p - 6:05p
301 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Jeremy Dodd 0 Open
Behavioral Neuroscience
PSYC S2450Q 3 points.

An introduction to the analysis of psychological issues by anatomical, physiological, and pharmacological methods. Topics include neurons, neurotransmitters, neural circuits, human neuroanatomy, vision, learning, memory, emotion, and sleep and circadian rhythms.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2450 001/72156 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Elif Duman 3 Open
Biodiversity
EEEB S1001Q 3 points.

An introduction to the enormous diversity of life on Earth. From bacteria to mammals, this course will survey species diversity, with an emphasis on ecological interactions and conservation. The course will also use basics of genetics and evolutionary biology to explore how diversity is generated and maintained. [No previous knowledge of science is assumed. Fulfills a science requirement for most Columbia and GS undergraduates.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
EEEB 1001 001/74605 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Leo Douglas 3 Limited Availability
Buddhism: East Asian
RELI S2008Q 3 points.

Lecture and discussion. An introductory survey that studies East Asian Buddhism as an integral , living religious tradition. Emphasis on the reading of original treatises and historiographies in translation, while historical events are discussed in terms of their relevance to contemporary problems confronted by Buddhism. Global Core.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Calculus, I
MATH S1101Q 3 points.

Functions, limits, derivatives, introduction to integrals.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1101 002/74987 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:20p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Shuai Wang 3 Open
Calculus, II
MATH S1102Q 3 points.

Methods of integration, applications of the integral, Taylor's theorem, infinite series.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1102 002/13823 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
407 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Elena Giorgi 3 Open
Calculus, III
MATH S1201Q 3 points.

Columbia College students who aim at an economics major AND have at least the grade of B in Calculus I may take Calculus III directly after Calculus I. However, all students majoring in engineering, science, or mathematics should follow Calculus I with Calculus II. Vectors in dimensions 2 and 3, complex numbers and the complex exponential function with applications to differential equations, Cramer's rule, vector-valued functions of one variable, scalar-valued functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradients, surfaces, optimization, the method of Lagrange multipliers.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1201 002/64860 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Shizhang Li 3 Open
Calculus, IV
MATH S1202Q 3 points.

Double and triple integrals. Change of variables. Line and surface integrals. Grad, div, and curl. Vector integral calculus: Green's theorem, divergence theorem, Stokes' theorem

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1202 002/12607 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Pak Hin Lee 3 Open
Clinical Neuropsychology Seminar
PSYC S3625Q 3 points.

Analysis of the assessment of physical and psychiatric diseases impacting the central nervous system, with emphasis on the relationship between neuropathology and cognitive and behavioral deficits.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3625 001/70940 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
652 SCHERMERHORN HALL
E'mett McCaskill 3 Open
College Algebra and Analytic Geometry
MATH S1003Q 3 points.

Algebra review, graphs and functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, conic sections, systems of equations in two variables, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and trigonometric identities, applications of trigonometry, sequences, series, and limits.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 1003 002/23950 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:25p
407 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Penka Marinova 3 Open
Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia
AHUM S1400Q 4 points.

AHUM UN3399 and AHUM UN3400 form a sequence but either may be taken separately. AHUM UN3399 may also be taken as part of a sequence with AHUM UN3830. Readings in translation and discussion of texts of Middle Eastern, Indian, Chinese, and Japanese origin, including the Analects of Confucius, Mencius, Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, the Lotus Sutra, Dream of the Red Chamber, Tale of Genji, Zen literature, Noh plays, bunraku (puppet) plays, Chinese and Japanese poetry. Partially fulfills Global Core Requirement. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHUM 1400 001/10996 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
411 KENT HALL
David Moerman 4 Open
Comic Theater: From Shakespeare to the New York City Stage
ENGL S4452Q 3 points.

Why do we still laugh at comic works from nearly 2500 years ago, comedies that have outlived their generations? An examination of the different forms of staged comedy throughout the centuries, beginning with foundational texts from Ancient Greece, especially Aristophanes. We consider how today's playwrights are still building on, and making reference to, primary works from the Western canon. Texts we will read range from Shakespeare, Jonson and Restoration comedies, to Wilde, Beckett, Hansberry, Tennessee Williams, Pinter, and Churchill. We will also cover contemporary work seen on the stages of New York, including short comic plays, stand up, and physical comedy. Attention will be given to comic characters, comic pretense, wit, humor, comedy of errors, comic gestures, comic archetypes, farce, cross-dressing, satiric comedy, comic relief, tragicomedy, romantic comedy, and theatre of the absurd. This course will be of special interest to serious students of comedy. When possible, class outings make use of current New York City productions.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 4452 001/20941 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
313 HAMILTON HALL
Jonathan Robinson-Appels 3 Closed
Comparative Foreign Policy
INAF S6572Q 3 points.

This course explores the unique and distinct foreign policy behavior of different states in the international system. Explanations of state behavior will be drawn from many overarching international relations frameworks including but not necessarily limited to realism, liberalism, and constructivism. The effects of power, culture, institutions and history will be examined.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6572 001/22770 Tu Th 2:00p - 5:10p
1102 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Zachary Shirkey 3 Open
Computer Science Theory
COMS S3261Q 3 points.

Regular languages: deterministic and non-deterministic finite automata, regular expressions. Context-free languages: context-free grammars, push-down automata. Turing machines, the Chomsky hierarchy, and the Church-Turing thesis. Introduction to Complexity Theory and NP-Completeness.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 3261 002/63779 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
413 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Robert Holliday 3 Open
Constitutional Crises on Campus: Constitutional Law through the Lens of Higher Education
LAW S3200Q 3 points.

The intricacies of the most controversial aspects of the American Constitution play out daily on college campuses across the country. Who gets admitted to elite institutions, and what factors should they consider? Faculties have tenure to protect their right to challenge conventional wisdom, but what exactly does Academic Freedom protect? Students have the right to free speech, or do they? Can a college censor a student newspaper? If a student is disciplined on campus, do they have a right to an attorney? Do students have a property interest in their education that can cost over $100,000? How does the law treat private and public institutions differently? This course is designed to explore the most controversial of constitutional topics including the First Amendment right to free speech, the Fifth Amendment's takings clause, the Sixth Amendment right to counsel, and the Fourteenth Amendment's guarantee of equal protection, procedural due process and substantive due process in regards to life, liberty, and property.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LAW 3200 001/72595 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:20p
214 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Christopher Riano 3 Open
Corporate Finance
BUSI PS5003Q 3 points.

Students will learn the critical corporate finance concepts including financial statement analysis; performance metrics; valuation of stocks and bonds; project and firm valuation; cost of capital; capital investment strategies and sources of capital, and firm growth strategies. At the end of this course students will understand how to apply these concepts to current business problems.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5003 001/26996 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
517 HAMILTON HALL
John Van Ness 3 Open
BUSI 5003 D02/83447 M 8:10p - 10:00p
ONLINE ONLY
Gary Tsarsis 3 Open
Data Structures in JAVA
COMS S3134Q 3 points.

Data types and structures: arrays, stacks, singly and doubly linked lists, queues, trees, sets, and graphs. Programming techniques for processing such structures: sorting and searching, hashing, garbage collection. Storage management. Rudiments of the analysis of algorithms. Taught in Java.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 3134 001/68108 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
633 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Paul Blaer 3 Open
East Asian Security: Power, Institutions, and Ideas
INAF S6801Q 3 points.

This course empowers students to develop a deep understanding of the major issues of East Asian security. We will examine the various challenges to stability in East Asia in the context of power, institutions, and ideas (the three primary factors that impact international relations), including: China’s increasing assertiveness; the North Korean nuclear crisis; historical stigma amongst Japan, South Korea, and China; lingering Cold War confrontations on the Korean Peninsula and across the Taiwan Strait; and an unstable relationship between the US and China. Through a comparison with the West, students will inquire whether a unique approach is required when considering appropriate responses to security issues in East Asia.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6801 001/64895 M W 2:00p - 5:10p
1102 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Fumiko Sasaki 3 Open
Elementary French I
FREN S1101Q 4 points.

Equivalent to FREN C1101 or F1101.Designed to help students understand, speak, read, and write French, and to recognize cultural features of French-speaking communities, now with the help of a newly digitized audio program. Students learn to provide information in French about their feelings, environment, families, and daily activities. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video material.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 1101 003/23991 M Tu W Th 6:00p - 8:05p
413 HAMILTON HALL
Adham Azab 4 Open
Elementary French, II
FREN S1102Q 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee

,

Equivalent to FREN C1102 or F1102. Continues the work of French S1101D and completes the study of elementary French. Students continue to develop communicative skills, narrating recent events (past, present, and future), describing daily life activities, and learning about cultural features of France and of the wider Francophone world. Following the communicative approach, students, with the help of the instructor, learn to solve problems using the language, to communicate their feelings and opinions, and to obtain information from others. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 1102 002/15079 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:05p
413 HAMILTON HALL
Eric Matheis 4 Open
FREN 1102 003/75027 M Tu W Th 6:00p - 8:05p
407 HAMILTON HALL
Elsa Stephan 4 Open
Elementary Italian, II
ITAL S1102Q 4 points.

Continues the work of ITAL 1101 and completes the study of elementary Italian. Students continue to develop communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills). Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to provide basic information in Italian about wants and needs, personal opinions and wishes, personal experiences, past activities, and daily routines; read simple texts on familiar matters of high frequency everyday or job-related language; draw on a repertoire of vocabulary and syntax sufficient for dealing with everyday situations.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ITAL 1102 001/23169 M Tu W Th 11:00a - 1:05p
509 HAMILTON HALL
Umberto Mazzei 4 Open
Elementary Spanish, I
SPAN S1101Q 4 points.

Elementary course, equivalent to SPAN V1101 or F1101. Fundamental principles of grammar; practice in pronunciation. Reading and conversation are introduced from the beginning. Use of the language laboratory is required.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1101 003/62011 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
315 HAMILTON HALL
Omar Duran-Garcia 4 Open
Elementary Spanish, II
SPAN S1102Q 4 points.

Equivalent to SPAN F1102 or V1102. Grammar exercises, prose readings, and practice in the spoken language.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 1102 002/69706 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 8:20p
315 HAMILTON HALL
Almudena Marin-Cobos 4 Open
Empire of Liberty: A Global History of the U.S. Military
HIST S3455Q 3 points.

America's wars in context, from King Philip's War in 1675 to present conflicts in Afghanistan and the Middle East. This course charts the expansion of U.S. military power from a band of colonists to a globe-girdling colossus with over two million personnel, some 800 bases around the world, and an annual budget of approximately $686 billion - about 57 percent of federal discretionary spending, and more than the next 14 nations combined. It introduces students to the history of American military power; the economic, political, and technological rise of the military-industrial complex and national security state; the role of the armed services in international humanitarian work; and the changing role of the military in domestic and international politics. A three-point semester-long course compressed into six weeks. Syllabus is located here: http://www.bobneer.com/empireofliberty/.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3455 001/73424 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
302 FAYERWEATHER
Robert Neer 3 Open
Epistemology
PHIL S3960Q 3 points.

What can we know? What is knowledge? How is it different from belief? Are there irrational beliefs? Are false beliefs a mark of irrationality? These are just some of the topics that we will explore as we read various classical works in epistemology.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3960 001/73354 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Simon Brown 3 Open
Evaluating the Evidence of Authenticity
AHIS S3010Q 4 points.

    The adjudged authenticity of a work of art is fundamental in determining its value as a commodity on the art market or, for example, in property claim disputes or in issues of cultural property restitution.  Using case studies some straightforward and others extremely vexing--this course examines the many ways in which authenticity is measured through the use of provenance and art historical research, connoisseurship, and forensic resources.  From within the broader topics, finer issues will also be explored, among them, the hierarchy of attribution, condition and conservation, copies and reproductions, the period eye and the style of the marketplace.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3010 001/13529 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
930 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Lynn Catterson 4 Open
Existentialism
PHIL S3350Q 3 points.

A survey of major themes of Existentialist philosophy in Europe from the mid 19th century to the mid 20th century, this class will focus on Kierkegaard, Heidegger, and Sartre and their influences on philosophical conceptions of the human being and the form of its freedom, and the consequences of anxiety, nihilism, and despair in the face of death.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3350 001/14622 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
306 HAMILTON HALL
Conor Cullen 3 Open
Fiction Writing Workshop
WRIT S1001Q 3 points.

The Fiction Writing Workshop is designed for students who have little or no experience writing imaginative prose. Students are introduced to a range of craft concerns through exercises and discussions, and eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

,

Enrollment limited to 15.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1001 002/62081 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
407 DODGE BUILDING
Kathleen Alcott 3 Open
Financial Accounting
BUSI PS5009Q 3 points.

Students will examine the generally accepted account principles (GAAP) underlying financial statements and their implementation in practice. The perspective and main focus of the course is from the users of the information contained in the statements, including investors, financial analysts, creditors and, management. By the end of this class students will be able to construct a cash flow statement, balance sheet and decipher a 10K report.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5009 001/28196 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
602 HAMILTON HALL
Marc Blatter 3 Open
BUSI 5009 D02/27546 Th 8:10p - 10:00p
ONLINE ONLY
Rebecca Shaffer 3 Open
Financial Economics
ECON S3025Q 3 points.

Equivalent to ECON UN3025. Institutional nature and economic function of financial markets. Emphasis on both domestic and international markets (debt, stock, foreign exchange, Eurobond, Eurocurrency, futures, options, and others). Principles of security pricing and portfolio management; the capital asset pricing model and the efficient markets hypothesis.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 3025 001/72990 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:20p
1102 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
A. Vivette Ancona 3 Open
Fundamentals of Computer Systems
CSEE S3827Q 3 points.

Fundamentals of computer organization and digital logic. Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, basic gates and components, flipflops and latches, counters and state machines, basics of combinational and sequential digital design. Assembly language, instruction sets, ALU's, single-cycle and multi-cycle processor design, introduction to pipelined processors, caches, and virtual memory.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CSEE 3827 001/22335 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
313 FAYERWEATHER
Timothy Paine 3 Open
General Chemistry II (Lecture)
CHEM S1404Q 4 points.

Topics include gases, kinetic theory of gases, states of matter: liquids and solids, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, applications of equilibria, thermochemistry and spontaneous processes (energy, enthalpy, entropy, free energy) as well as chemical kinetics and electrochemistry. The order of presentation of topics may differ from the order presented here. Students must also attend the daily morning recitations which accompany the lectures (total time block: MTWR 9:30-12:20). Registering for CHEM S1404Q will automatically register students for the recitation section. The continuation of CHEM S1403D General Chemistry I Lecture. Students who wish to take the full sequence of General Chemistry Lectures and General Chemistry Laboratory should also register for CHEM S1403D and CHEM S1500X (see below). This course is equivalent to CHEM W1404 General Chemistry II Lecture.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1404 001/73389 M Tu W Th 10:35a - 12:20p
320 HAVEMEYER HALL
Robert Beer 4 Open
General Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM S1500Q 3 points.

Introduction to basic experimental techniques in chemistry, including quantitative procedures, chemical analysis, and descriptive chemistry. To be enrolled in CHEM S1500Q you must also register for CHEM S1501Q Lab Lecture MW 1:00pm-2:15pm.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1500 002/19920 M W 2:25p - 6:00p
302A HAVEMEYER HALL
Kim Lee-Granger 3 Limited Availability
General Chemistry Laboratory Lecture
CHEM S1501Q 0 points.

Lab lecture for CHEM S1500Q General Chemistry Laboratory.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 1501 002/69741 M W 1:00p - 2:15p
209 HAVEMEYER HALL
Kim Lee-Granger 0 Limited Availability
General Physics II Laboratory
PHYS S1292Q 1 points.

Laboratory for PHYS S1202Q. Assignments to laboratory sections are made after the first lecture, offered Mon/Wed or Tues/Thurs 10.30AM-1.30PM.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 1292 001/16654 M W 10:30a - 1:30p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
PHYS 1292 002/76602 Tu Th 10:30a - 1:30p
Room TBA Building TBA
Giuseppina Cambareri 1 Open
General Physics, II
PHYS S1202Q 3 points.

The same course as PHYS S1202X, but given in a six-week session. Assignments to discussion sections are made after the first lecture. Basic introduction to the study of electricity, magnetism, optics, special relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics.The accompanying laboratory is PHYS S1292Q. NOTE: There are two recitation sessions that meet for one hour each week. The recitation times will be selected at the first class meeting.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHYS 1202 001/26782 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 10:15a
301 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Jeremy Dodd 3 Open
History of Philosophy I: Presocratics To Augustine
PHIL S2101Q 3 points.

Exposition and analysis of the positions of the major philosophers from the pre-Socratics through Augustine.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 2101 001/15074 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
316 HAMILTON HALL
James Finley 3 Open
History of the City of New York
HIST S3535Q 3 points.

The social, cultural, economic, political, and demographic development of America's metropolis from colonial days to present. Slides and walking tours supplement the readings.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3535 001/64513 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
311 FAYERWEATHER
Stephen Sullivan 3 Open
How to Write Funny
WRIT S4810Q 3 points.

In this class we will consider the various forms and functions of humor in written prose, discussing techniques and approaches to humor writing. Students will write their own humorous stories and essays which we will read and discuss in class, focusing not only on what is or isn't funny, but on how humor can be advantageously used to increase the power of an overall piece. The class will also break down stories, novels, and essays from a variety of authors-Bill Hicks' political satire; the darkly comedic fiction of Barry Hannah and Paul Beatty; the absurd humor of Tina Fey and Baratunde Thurston; Anthony Lane's charming British snarkiness; Spy Magazine's sharply parodic voice; Woody Allen's one-liners; Lena Dunham's zeitgeist comedy-in an effort to better understand what makes their humor work. Students will be asked to write stories inspired and influenced by these authors. As we critique each other's work, we will investigate strategies related to the craft of humor writing, including self-deprecation, political satire, humor and the other, going blue, dark comedy, schtick, humor as a means vs. humor as an end, crossing the line, and how to write funny without sacrificing substance.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 4810 001/66875 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
411 DODGE BUILDING
Patricia Marx 3 Open
Human Rights and Global Economic Justice
HRTS S4185Q 3 points.

The world economy is a patchwork of competing and complementary interests among and between governments, corporations, and civil society. These stakeholders at times cooperate and also conflict over issues of global poverty, inequality, and sustainability. What role do human rights play in coordinating the different interests that drive global economic governance? This seminar will introduce students to different structures of global governance for development, trade, labor, finance, the environment, migration, and intellectual property and investigate their relationship with human rights. Students will learn about public, private, and mixed forms of governance, analyze the ethical and strategic perspectives of the various stakeholders and relate them to existing human rights norms. The course will examine the work of multilateral organizations such as the United Nations and the International Financial Institutions, as well as international corporate and non-governmental initiatives.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 4185 001/23968 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
402 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Rainer Braun 3 Limited Availability
Human Rights and Visual Culture
HRTS S4190Q 3 points.

This course examines the relationship between visual culture and human rights. It considers a wide range of visual media (photography, painting, sculpture), as well as aspects of visuality (surveillance, profiling). We will use case studies ranging in time from the early modern period (practices in which the body was marked to measure criminality, for example), to the present day. Within this framework, we will study how aspects of visual culture have been used to advocate for human rights, as well as how images and visual regimes have been used to suppress human rights. An important part of the course will be to consider the role played by reception in shaping a discourse around human rights, visuality, and images. Subjects to be addressed include: the nature of evidence; documentation and witness; censorship; iconoclasm; surveillance; profiling; advocacy images; signs on the body; visibility and invisibility.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 4190 001/15057 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
402B INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Susan Merriam 3 Open
Immigrant New York
SOCI S3980Q 3 points.

Over the course of the twentieth century, New York City has witnessed two major waves of immigration. From the Irish, Italian and Jewish immigrants who arrived at the turn of the twentieth century to the Chinese, Jamaican and Mexican immigrants who now constitute the majority of the city’s immigrant population, New York City has a long tradition of integrating new immigrants.


How has immigration transformed New York City, both in the past and in the present? What are the major ethnic groups in the city? How are immigrants and their U.S.-born children incorporated into the city’s schools, workplaces and neighborhoods? How will their integration reshape patterns of ethnic and racial inequality in the city? This course answers these questions by focusing on New York City as a case study to highlight how immigration has transformed the city’s demographic, political, socioeconomic and spatial landscape. On the one hand, the influx of immigrants has brought about economic revitalization of many neighborhoods from Jackson Heights to Washington Heights, lowering the crime rate and stimulating business growth. On the other hand, immigration and diversity have raised concerns about social cohesion and security. 


The course welcomes students from a range of disciplinary background, including sociology, urban studies, social anthropology, political science, and history. There are no prerequisites to the course and it is open to all undergraduate students, although no auditors will be allowed. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3980 001/78298 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
104 KNOX HALL
Dialika Sall 3 Open
Impressionism in New York
AHIS S3443Q 3 points.

This course will introduce students to the avant-garde movement of Impressionism by making extensive use of New York collections, particularly those of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. We will study Impressionist art and artists in relation to the aesthetic, social and political backdrop of late nineteenth-century France, with attention to the artistic climate in America and Great Britain. Central to the discussion will be the position of women artists, models and collectors during this transformative period. Topics will include: artistic institutions, training and practice; new attitudes toward urban and rural spaces and toward leisure and labor; gender, fashion and social identity; relationships among artists, dealers, critics and patrons; and exhibiting Impressionism in new contexts.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3443 001/13780 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Susan Sivard 3 Open
Intensive Elementary Latin
LATN S1121Q 6 points.

Equivalent to Latin 1101 and 1102. Covers all of Latin grammar and syntax in one term to prepare the student to enter Latin 1201 or 1202. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 1121 002/75404 M Tu W Th 1:00p - 4:10p
413 HAMILTON HALL
Ursula Poole 6 Open
Intensive Intermediate Greek: Poetry and Prose
GREK S2121Q 6 points.

Equivalent to Greek 1201 and Greek 1202. Reading of selected Attic Greek prose and poetry with a review of grammar in one term to prepare the student to enter third-year Greek. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GREK 2121 001/97191 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 12:10p
511 HAMILTON HALL
Yujhan Claros 6 Open
Intensive Intermediate Latin: Poetry and Prose
LATN S2121Q 6 points.

Equivalent to Latin 1201 and 1202. Reading of selected Latin prose and poetry with a review of grammar in one term to prepare the student to enter third-year Latin. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
LATN 2121 001/63007 M Tu W Th 9:00a - 12:10p
522A KENT HALL
Kristina Milnor 6 Open
Intermediate French, I
FREN S2101Q 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee


Equivalent to FREN C1201 and F1201. Prepares students for advanced French language and cultures, focusing on developing correct usage through explanations and practice. Gaining a deeper understanding of the French language through readings of poems and short stories, students practice a variety of communication tasks, as they are engaged in ever more complex forms of discourse. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 2101 002/13863 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:05p
407 HAMILTON HALL
Noni Carter 4 Open
Intermediate French, II
FREN S2102Q 4 points.

$15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee


Equivalent to FREN C1202 and F1202. Continues to prepare students for advanced French language and culture with an emphasis on developing highly accurate speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students examine complex topics, using the French language in diverse contexts, and read and actively discuss a wide variety of texts from France and the French speaking world. Daily assignments, quizzes, and screening of video materials.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 2102 002/73811 M Tu W Th 10:00a - 12:05p
411 HAMILTON HALL
Diana King 4 Limited Availability
Intermediate German, II
GERM S2102Q 4 points.

Equivalent to GERM UN2102. Topics cover areas of German literature, history, art, and society. Students also read a German novel or drama. Intermediate-high to advanced-low proficiency (ACTFL scale) in speaking, listening, reading, and writing German is expected upon completion. Prepares student for advanced German, upper-level literature and culture courses and study in Berlin. Students planning to study in Berlin in spring are advised to complete GERM S2102 in the Summer Session. Students are advised that this course is a full-time commitment. Students should expect to study 2 hours every day for every hour spent in the classroom and additional time on weekends.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
GERM 2102 001/94258 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
313 HAMILTON HALL
Michael Swellander 4 Open
Intermediate Spanish II: Health-Related Topics in the Spanish-Speaking World
SPAN S2103Q 4 points.
An intensive course in Spanish language communicative competence with an emphasis on oral interaction, reading, writing, and culture at an Intermediate II level with focus on health-related topics in the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPAN UN 2101 or equivalent (as designated by the Department’s Placement Examination).
In an increasingly interconnected world, and in multilingual global cities such as New York City, the study of a foreign language is fundamental not only in the field of the humanities but also in the natural sciences. This interdisciplinary course analyzes the intersection between these two disciplines through the study of health-related topics in Iberian and Latin American cultural expressions (literature, film, documentaries, among other sources) in order to explore new critical perspectives across both domains. Students will learn health-related vocabulary and usage-based grammar in Spanish. Students will develop a cultural understanding of medicine, illness, and treatment in the Spanish-speaking world. Finally, students will be able to carry out specific collaborative tasks in Spanish with the aim of integrating language, culture, and health.
*This course fulfills the last semester of the foreign language requirement. Therefore, students who have taken SPAN UN 2101 (Intermediate Spanish I), and are interested in health-related topics may proceed and enroll in SPAN UN 2103 (Intermediate Spanish II: Health-Related Topics in the Spanish-Speaking World). Pre-med and pre-health students, as well as those students majoring in the natural sciences –including biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics—will be given registration priority. All Columbia students must take Spanish language courses (UN 1101-3300) for a letter grade.
Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2103 001/11546 M Tu W Th 4:00p - 6:05p
316 HAMILTON HALL
Juan Pablo Cominguez 4 Open
Intermediate Spanish, I
SPAN S2101Q 4 points.

Equivalent to SPAN C1201 or F1201. Rapid grammar review, composition, and reading of literary works by contemporary authors.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2101 002/60795 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 8:20p
316 HAMILTON HALL
Pablo Justel Vicente 4 Open
Intermediate Spanish, II
SPAN S2102Q 4 points.

Equivalent to SPAN C1202 or F1202. Readings of contemporary authors, with emphasis on class discussion and composition.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SPAN 2102 002/77401 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 8:20p
318 HAMILTON HALL
Luisina Gentile 4 Limited Availability
International Human Rights Law
HRTS S4220Q 3 points.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and problems of international human rights law. What are the origins of modern human rights law? What is the substance of this law, who is obligated by it, and how is it enforced? The course will cover the major international human rights treaties and mechanisms and consider some of today's most significant human rights issues and controversies. While the topics are necessarily law-related, the course will assume no prior exposure to legal studies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HRTS 4220 001/66093 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
501A INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Belinda Cooper 3 Limited Availability
Introduction to American Government and Politics
POLS S1201Q 4 points.

Introduction to national political institutions and processes. The presidency, Congress, the courts, political parties and elections, interest groups, and public opinion.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1201 001/62032 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
711 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Judith Russell 4 Limited Availability
Introduction to Computing for Engineers and Applied Scientists
ENGI S1006Q 3 points.

An interdisciplinary course in computing intended for first year SEAS students. Introduces computational thinking, algorithmic problem solving and Python programming with applications in science and engineering. Assumes no prior programming background.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGI 1006 001/24767 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
633 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
Daniel Bauer 3 Open
Introduction to Finance
BUSI PS5001Q 3 points.

Students will be introduced to the fundamental financial issues of the modern corporation. By the end of this course, students will understand the basic concepts of financial planning, managing growth; debt and equity sources of financing and valuation; capital budgeting methods; and risk analysis, cost of capital, and the process of securities issuance.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5001 003/83046 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
603 HAMILTON HALL
Hany Guirguis 3 Open
Introduction to International Relations
POLS S1601Q 4 points.

A survey of major concepts and issues in international relations. Issues include anarchy, power, foreign policy decision-making, domestic politics and foreign policy, theories of cooperation and conflict, international security and arms control, nationalism, international law and organizations, and international economic relations.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 1601 001/25504 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
711 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Rebecca Murphy 4 Limited Availability
Introduction to Modern Analysis, II
MATH S4062Q 3 points.

Equicontinuity. Contraction maps with applications to existence theorems in analysis. Lebesgue measure and integral. Fourier series and Fourier transform

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 4062 001/19086 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:20p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Dobrin Marchev 3 Open
Introduction to Photography
VIAR S3701Q 3 points.

An introductory course in black-and-white photography, Photography I is a prerequisite for advanced photography classes held in the fall and spring. Students are initially instructed in proper camera use and basic film exposure and development. Then the twice weekly meetings are divided into lab days where students learn and master the fundamental tools and techniques of traditional darkroom work used in 8x10 print production and classroom days where students present their work and through the language of photo criticism gain an understanding of photography as a medium of expression. Admitted students must obtain a manually focusing 35mm camera with adjustable f/stops and shutter speeds. No prior photography experience is required.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
VIAR 3701 002/76638 M W 6:15p - 9:25p
212 DODGE BUILDING
Jesse Wakeman 3 Open
VIAR 3701 003/24385 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
212 DODGE BUILDING
Nathaniel Ward 3 Limited Availability
Introduction to Statistics (with calculus)
STAT S1201Q 3 points.

Designed for students who desire a strong grounding in statistical concepts with a greater degree of mathematical rigor than in STAT W1111. Random variables, probability distributions, pdf, cdf, mean, variance, correlation, conditional distribution, conditional mean and conditional variance, law of iterated expectations, normal, chi-square, F and t distributions, law of large numbers, central limit theorem, parameter estimation, unbiasedness, consistency, efficiency, hypothesis testing, p-value,confidence intervals. maximum likelihood estimation. Satisfies the pre-requisites for ECON W3412.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 1201 002/20338 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
903 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Miguel Garrido Garcia 3 Open
Introduction to Statistics (without calculus)
STAT S1101Q 3 points.

Designed for students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. This course satisfies the statistics requirements of all majors except statistics, economics, and engineering. Graphical and numerical summaries, probability, theory of sampling distributions, linear regression, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing are taught as aids to quantitative reasoning and data analysis. Use of statistical software required. Illustrations are taken from a variety of fields. Data-collection/analysis project with emphasis on study designs is part of the coursework requirement.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 1101 002/29249 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
903 SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Alessandro Anto Grande 3 Open
Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists
PSYC S1610Q 4 points.

Recommended preparation: One course in behavioral science and knowledge of high school algebra. An introduction to statistics that concentrates on problems from the behavioral sciences.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1610 001/21119 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:50p
200B SCHERMERHORN HALL
Lawrence Reed 4 Open
Labor Economics
ECON S4400Q 3 points.

This course examines labor markets through the lens of economics. In broad terms, labor economics is the study of the exchange of labor services for wages—a category that takes in a wide range of
topics. Our objective in this course is to lay the foundations for explaining labor market phenomena within an economic framework and subsequently apply this knowledge-structure to a select set of questions. Throughout this process we will discuss empirical research, which will highlight the power (as well as the limitations) of employing economic models to real-world problems. By the end of this course we will have the tools/intuition to adequately formulate and critically contest arguments concerning labor markets.
 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4400 001/93630 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Lorenzo Lagos 3 Open
Language Encounters
LING S3077Q 3 points.

This course is an introduction to the study of languages in society. It familiarizes students with the theory and methodology of the study of language in its social and cultural settings, as well as its relation to other aspects of human knowledge. We will look at the intersections between Niger-Congo and Semitic languages in Africa and the Arab world, and what they can tell us about the role of language in human society. Of particular interest are issues dealing with language spread (lingua franca, the role of media), language variation (space, social status, gender, age, ethnicity, race, dialectal differences, and diglossia), and language contact (codeswitching, and loanwords).

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Leading Alignment and Agility
BUSI PS5015Q 3 points.

This course explains how leaders build competitive advantage within their organizations by creating a clear purpose; then balance it with agile practices that leverage, challenge and evolve that purpose. It explores how leaders use neuroscience-based techniques to unlock performance and adaptability as the speed of change continues to accelerate.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5015 001/29029 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
503 HAMILTON HALL
Ric Oslin 3 Open
Linear Algebra
MATH S2010Q 3 points.

Matrices, vector spaces, linear transformation, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, canonical forms, applications.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 2010 002/29214 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
407 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Darren Gooden 3 Open
Machine Learning
COMS S4771Q 3 points.

Topics from generative and discriminative machine learning including least squares methods, support vector machines, kernel methods, neural networks, Gaussian distributions, linear classification, linear regression, maximum likelihood, exponential family distributions, Bayesian networks, Bayesian inference, mixture models, the EM algorithm, graphical models and hidden Markov models. Algorithms implemented in Matlab.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
COMS 4771 002/75336 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
417 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Nakul Verma 3 Open
Machine Learning for the Social Sciences
QMSS GR5073Q 3 points.

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of machine learning as it is applied in a number of domains. Comparisons and contrasts will be drawn between this machine learning approach and more traditional regression-based approaches used in the social sciences. Emphasis will also be placed on opportunities to synthesize these two approaches. The course will start with an introduction to Python, the scikit-learn package and GitHub. After that, there will be some discussion of data exploration, visualization in matplotlib, preprocessing, feature engineering, variable imputation, and feature selection. Supervised learning methods will be considered, including OLS models, linear models for classification, support vector machines, decision trees and random forests, and gradient boosting. Calibration, model evaluation and strategies for dealing with imbalanced datasets, n on-negative matrix factorization, and outlier detection will be considered next. This will be followed by unsupervised techniques: PCA, discriminant analysis, manifold learning, clustering, mixture models, cluster evaluation. Lastly, we will consider neural networks, convolutional neural networks for image classification and recurrent neural networks. This course will primarily us Python. Previous programming experience will be helpful but not requisite. Prerequisites: basic probability and statistics, basic linear algebra, and calculus.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
QMSS 5073 001/63146 M W 4:00p - 6:10p
405 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Michael Parrott 3 Open
Managing Human Behavior in the Organization
BUSI PS5010Q 3 points.

Students will gain an overview of major concepts of management and organization theory, concentrating on understanding human behavior in organizational contexts, with heavy emphasis on the application of concepts to solve managerial problems. By the end of this course students will have developed the skills to motivate employees, establish professional interpersonal relationships, take a leadership role, and conduct performance appraisal.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5010 002/26529 Tu Th 6:10p - 9:30p
702 HAMILTON HALL
John Bockstoce 3 Limited Availability
Managing Human Behavior in the Organization
BUSI PS4010Q 3 points.

An introduction to and overview of major concepts of management and organization theory concentrating on understanding human behavior in organizational contexts, with heavy emphasis on the application of concepts to solve managerial problems. Behavioral issues at the individual, group, and systems levels. The class is shaped around lectures, discussions, case studies, simulations, and small group exercises.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Managing Information and Knowledge
BUSI PS5301Q 3 points.

  In this course students learn the principles of management as they relate to enterprise-wide information and knowledge services. Attention is given to the philosophy and history of information and knowledge services, specifically as this background affects students’ future performance as managers and leaders in the workplace. The focus is on management and leadership skills, knowledge sharing, and the role of knowledge strategy in strengthening the corporate knowledge culture.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5301 001/92066 Tu Th 6:10p - 9:30p
507 HAMILTON HALL
Milton Pesantez, Guy St. Clair 3 Open
Marketing Strategy
BUSI PS5025Q 3 points.

Students will develop analytical skills used to formulate and implement marketing driven strategies for an organization. Students will develop a deeper understanding of marketing strategies and how to implement tactics to achieve desired goals. Students will work on case study projects in both individual and a team based projects. By the end of this course you will be able to develop a marketing strategy based market assessments and company needs.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5025 001/60941 M W 6:10p - 9:30p
702 HAMILTON HALL
Sandy Becker 3 Open
BUSI 5025 D02/25505 W 8:10p - 10:00p
ONLINE ONLY
Andrew Blum 3 Open
Marketing Strategy
BUSI K4025Q 3 points.

Students will develop analytical skills used to formulate and implement marketing driven strategies for an organization. Students will develop a deeper understanding of marketing strategies and how to implement tactics to achieve desired goals. Students will work on case study projects in both individual and a team based projects. By the end of this course you will be able to develop a marketing strategy based market assessments and company needs. Pre-requisite: BUSI K4020. Please note that tuition is the same for online and on-campus courses, there is an additional $85 course fee for online courses.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Masterpieces of Western Art
HUMA S1121Q 3 points.

Equivalent to HUMA C1121 and F1121. Not a historical survey but an analytical study of masterpieces, including originals available in the metropolitan area. The chief purpose is to acquaint students with the experience of a work of art. A series of topics in the development of Western art, selected to afford a sense of the range of expressive possibilities in painting, sculpture, and architecture, such as the Parthenon, the Gothic cathedral, and works of Michelangelo, Bruegel, Picasso, and others. Space is limited. Columbia University undergraduates who need this course for graduation are encouraged to register during early registration.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HUMA 1121 008/70523 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Adam Levine 3 Closed
HUMA 1121 010/28397 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Michael Waters 3 Open
HUMA 1121 011/62827 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Elizabeth Gollnick 3 Open
HUMA 1121 012/19486 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Denise Budd 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 013/10574 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
930 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Brian van Oppen 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1121 014/86530 Tu Th 5:30p - 8:40p
832 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Isabella Lores-Chavez 3 Open
HUMA 1121 015/60821 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Alvaro Luis Lima 3 Limited Availability
Masterpieces of Western Music
HUMA S1123Q 3 points.

Equivalent to MUSI F1123 and C1123. Part of the Core Curriculum since 1947, Music Humanities aims to instill in students a basic comprehension of the many forms of the Western musical imagination. Its specific goals are to awaken and encourage in students an appreciation of music in the Western world, to help them learn to respond intelligently to a variety of musical idioms, and to engage them in the various debates about the character and purposes of music that have occupied composers and musical thinkers since ancient times. The course attempts to involve students actively in the process of critical listening, both in the classroom and in concerts that the students attend and write about. The extraordinary richness of musical life in New York is thus an integral part of the course. Although not a history of Western music, the course is taught in a chronological format and includes masterpieces by Josquin des Prez, Monteverdi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Verdi, Wagner, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky, among others. No previous knowledge of music required. Columbia University undergraduates who need this course for graduation are encouraged to register during early registration.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HUMA 1123 006/69324 M W 6:00p - 9:10p
405 DODGE BUILDING
Ashkan Behzadi 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 007/10592 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
405 DODGE BUILDING
Velia Ivanova 3 Open
HUMA 1123 008/27199 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
404 DODGE BUILDING
Marc Hannaford 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 009/61629 Tu Th 6:00p - 9:10p
404 DODGE BUILDING
John Rot 3 Open
HUMA 1123 010/28415 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
622 DODGE BUILDING
Michael Weinstein 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 013/19503 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
404 DODGE BUILDING
Laura Weber 3 Limited Availability
HUMA 1123 016/75507 M W 6:00p - 9:10p
622 DODGE BUILDING
Mary Robb 3 Limited Availability
Media, Culture, & Society in the Age of the Internet
SOCI S3671Q 3 points.

This course examines social relations through culture embedded in media. The focus will be on how our behavior is shaped by the symbols and stories we encounter and share through information technology. We will consider the impact of interactive and social media on our experiences, decisions, and work. What are the politics of data? Does technology isolate or connect us? Does media consumption enrich or sap our creativity? Our intellect? The goal of the course is to arm students with conceptual tools to think critically about the role of technology and mediated culture in society.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3671 001/25601 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
318 HAMILTON HALL
Larry Au 3 Open
Music of India and West Asia
AHMM S3321Q 3 points.

This course is a topical (not comprehensive) survey of some of the musical traditions of South and West Asia, and of their diasporas. Each tradition will be described locally, connecting it to critical themes that the course aims to explore. The purpose of the course is to introduce you to a range of indigenous and diasporic “Asian” musical styles, ideas, traditions, and artists through an interdisciplinary approach to the study of music as culture. No previous background in music is required. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHMM 3321 001/12529 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
620 DODGE BUILDING
Alessandra Ciucci 3 Open
New York and the Death and Afterlife of Film
AHIS S3440Q 3 points.

This undergraduate seminar aims to demonstrate the discursive, technical and artistic significance of film to contemporary art practice. It introduces students to examples of recent scholarly work that considers early cinema, Hollywood production and twentieth-century analog film practice within the discourse of archives, the media dispositif, media archaeology, an aesthetics of obsolescence and that treats screens, film archives, film laboratories, cinemas and museums as privileged sites of artistic production. In addition to critical theory, the focus of the seminar is on contemporary artists who interrogate the artistic potential of film by incorporating the techniques, mechanisms, materials, sites and figural contents of film history in their work. Case studies include Jean-Luc Godard, Ken Jacobs, Tacita Dean, Harun Farocki and others.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
AHIS 3440 001/91247 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Eszter Polonyi 3 Open
Nonfiction Writing Workshop
WRIT S1101Q 3 points.

The Nonfiction Writing Workshop is designed for students new to the practice of such genres as reportage, criticism, biography and memoir. Various techniques are explored through exercises and other assignments. Critique of student work is supplemented by outside readings.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1101 002/69776 M W 6:15p - 9:25p
411 DODGE BUILDING
Robert Dewhurst 3 Open
Ordinary Differential Equations
MATH S3027Q 3 points.

Equations of order one, linear equations, series solutions at regular and singular points. Boundary value problems. Selected applications.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
MATH 3027 002/71339 M Tu W Th 4:30p - 6:05p
312 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Zhechi Cheng 3 Open
Organic Chemistry II (Lecture)
CHEM S2444Q 4 points.

The principles of organic chemistry. The structure and reactivity of organic molecules are examined from the standpoint of modern theories of chemistry. Topics include stereochemistry, reactions of organic molecules, mechanisms of organic reactions, syntheses and degradations of organic molecules, and spectroscopic techniques of structure determination. This course is a continuation of CHEM S2443D Organic Chemistry I Lecture. Please note that students must attend a recitation for this class. Students who wish to take the full organic chemistry lecture sequence and laboratory should also register for CHEM S2443D Organic Chemistry I Lecture and CHEM S2543Q Organic Chemistry Lab - see below. This course is equivalent to CHEM W2444 Organic Chemistry II Lecture.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 2444 001/17489 M Tu W Th 10:35a - 12:20p
209 HAVEMEYER HALL
Anna Ghurbanyan 4 Open
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM S2543Q 3 points.

Techniques of experimental organic chemistry, with emphasis on understanding fundamental principles underlying the experiments in methodology of solving laboratory problems involving organic molecules. Attendance at the first laboratory session is mandatory. Please note that you must complete CHEM W2443 Organic Chemistry I Lecture or the equivalent to register for this lab course. This course is equivalent to CHEM W2543 Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
CHEM 2543 001/77437 M W 1:00p - 6:00p
202 HAVEMEYER HALL
Talha Siddiqui 3 Open
CHEM 2543 002/68525 Tu Th 1:00p - 6:00p
202 HAVEMEYER HALL
Talha Siddiqui 3 Limited Availability
Poetry Writing Workshop
WRIT S1201Q 3 points.

The Poetry Writing Workshop is designed for all students with a serious interest in poetry writing, from those who lack significant workshop experience or training in the craft of poetry to seasoned workshop participants looking for new challenges and perspectives on their work. Students will be assigned writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, collage, and others. Students will also read an variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
WRIT 1201 002/60865 M W 6:15p - 9:25p
409 DODGE BUILDING
Dorothea Lasky 3 Open
Producing the Low Budget Film
FILM S3833Q 3 points.

This practical lab focuses on the fundamental aspects of development, planning and preparation for low budget films. While using a short film script as their own case study – students will learn pitching, development, script breakdown, scheduling, budgeting and fundraising. Discussion of legal issues, location scouting, deliverables, marketing, distribution and film festival strategy will allow students to move forward with their own projects after completing the class. Using weekly assignments, in-class presentations and textbook readings to reinforce each class discussion topic, students will complete the class having created a final prep/production binder for their project, which includes the script breakdown, production schedule, line item budget, financing/fundraising plan and film festival strategy for their chosen script. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 3833 001/12993 Tu Th 10:00a - 1:00p
508 DODGE BUILDING
Veronica Nickel 3 Closed
Psychology of Sexuality and Gender
PSYC S3696Q 3 points.

Seminar reviewing seminal and current theoretical and empirical writings about the psychology of sex, sexuality, and gender. We will review and discuss readings across various fields in psychology, such as clinical, developmental, social, and health psychology as they pertain to issues in the study of sexuality and gender.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3696 001/16604 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Nadav Antebi-Gruszka 3 Open
Public Economics
ECON S4465Q 3 points.

Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and UN3213. Types of market failures and rationales for government intervention in the economy. Benefit-cost analysis and the theory of public goods. Positive and normative aspects of taxation. The U.S. tax structure.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ECON 4465 001/69342 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
404 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Matthew Mazewski 3 Open
Rapid Reading and Translation
FREN S2106Q 3 points.

Primarily for graduate students in other departments who have some background in French and who wish to meet the French reading requirement for the Ph.D. degree, or for scholars whose research involves references in the French language. Intensive reading and translation, both prepared and at sight, in works drawn from literature, criticism, philosophy, and history. Brief review of grammar; vocabulary exercises.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 2106 002/21559 Tu W Th 3:00p - 5:05p
407 HAMILTON HALL
Kalinka Alvarez 3 Open
Reforming American Elections
POLS S3296Q 3 points.

Nothing is more important to the legitimacy of a representative government than the integrity of elections. Throughout the history of the American republic, various actors have sought to shape electoral outcomes. Some have even done so legally! While contemporary citizens of the United States have tended to think of their elections as paragons of reliability, events in the last fifteen years or so have increasingly led to questions on this front. This course will examine issues of fairness, integrity, and security currently facing the American electoral system. In identifying ailments in American democracy, we will discuss both their causes and effects. Finally, we will examine potential reforms in an effort to determine to what extent American elections can be “fixed” (see what I did there?). This course will be particularly useful for students considering professional legal education as a next step.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3296 001/28002 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
703 HAMILTON HALL
Michael Miller 3 Open
Revolution and Radical Politics from Marx to May '68: Political Theory, History, and the Ideal Society
HIST S4981Q 4 points.

This seminar will expose students to classical texts in political theory relating to revolutionary action, political ethics and social militancy from the Communist Manifesto to 1968.  The course will explore the idea of revolutionary ethics as conceived by Western and non-Western political philosophers and militants.  The discussion will stress the connection between philosophers and revolutionary leaders and the transformation of the idea of radical politics through the dialogue between these two discourses (the philosophical and the militant) and the public reception of revolutionary events in the media and commemorative writings.  Authors will be examined according to their historical context and their role in the tradition of political thought and the history of radical politics from 1848 to the mid-sixties.  Students will be exposed to different discourses of political militancy and radical politics and to reflect on the ethical implications of the history of radical thought and action in comparative perspective. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 4981 001/11044 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
311 FAYERWEATHER
Alheli Alvarado-Diaz 4 Open
Rising Great Powers in International Relations
POLS S3625Q 3 points.

The rise of new great powers and hegemonic states has been a major engine of change in international relations, both historically and today. Predominant theories of war, trade, and empire take as their starting point the uneven growth in the power and wealth of major states and empires. Rapid economic growth and associated domestic institutional changes in rising great powers often unleash a volatile domestic politics that affects the ideologies and social interests that play a role in formulating foreign policy. In turn, the rising power’s international environment shapes the unfolding of these internal processes. This course will study these dynamics, tracing patterns in historical cases and applying the insights gained to contemporary issues.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 3625 001/62432 Tu Th 6:15p - 9:25p
711 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Edward Lemon 3 Open
Satire and Sensibility
ENGL S3703Q 3 points.

Groundbreaking novels and verse from early and mid-century—popular, then, enduring still—in which the satirical strain is nuanced by constraint of humor, pathos, and aesthetic criteria, enriching in the main a tragicomic outlook of literary consequence.  Our readings—diversely savage and tender, hilarious and exquisite in derision of vice and folly—comprise the gamut of satirical modalities from invective to irony. We shall examine those and inquire into the inventiveness of literary satire in this period, its perceived liberties and curbs, its favorite targets of scorn and ridicule, and the discourses on religion and politics, sex and romance, melancholy and imagination, learning and moral sentiment in which our authors participated and which came to bear in the skillful tacking of blame and praise. In view of the contemporaneousness of satirical observation, its characteristic bite and value as timely currency, we shall consider the 18th-century satirist’s innovative adaptation of classical and biblical models. Critical and philosophical writings are of the period, only, e.g., by Dryden, Shaftsbury, and Addison; verse genres include ode, epistle, elegy, georgic, mock emulations and hybrids: Finch, Swift, Pope, Gay; our novels are Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Fielding's Tom Jones, Goldsmith’s The Vicar of Wakefield, and Sterne's Tristram Shandy.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3703 001/13546 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
402 HAMILTON HALL
Marianne Giordani 3 Open
Security Analysis
BUSI PS5040Q 3 points.

Students will learn about the valuation of publicly traded equity securities. By the end of the semester students will be able to perform fundamental analysis ("bottoms-up," firm-level, business and financial analysis), prepare pro forma financial statements, estimate free cash flows and apply valuation models.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
BUSI 5040 001/25941 Tu Th 6:10p - 9:30p
516 HAMILTON HALL
Perry Beaumont 3 Open
Security Analysis
BUSI K4040Q 3 points.

Students will learn about the valuation of publicly traded equity securities. By the end of the semester students will be able to perform fundamental analysis ("bottoms-up," firm-level, business and financial analysis), prepare pro forma financial statements, estimate free cash flows and apply valuation models.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Seminar in Infant Development
PSYC S3280Q 3 points.

Analysis of human development during the first year of life, with an emphasis on infant perceptual and cognitive development.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 3280 001/19903 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Maria Crisafi 3 Open
Shakespearean Character on Stage and Page
ENGL S3233Q 3 points.

This course provides an introduction to Shakespeare through a combination of reading his plays and viewing them in performance.  On the one hand, we approach each play as a written, published text: our in-class conversation consist primarily in close analysis of key passages, and, in one class period, we visit Rare Books to examine the earliest printed versions of the plays in light of English Renaissance print technology.  On the other hand, we view performances of each assigned play, including the attendance as a group of at least one Shakespeare production on an NYC stage.  Our semester’s through line is to trace, from his earliest plays to Hamlet, Shakespeare’s remarkable development of the techniques of characterization that have made generations of both playgoers and readers feel that his dramatis personae are so modern, real, human.  We will also devote attention to exploring the value of each play in our present moment and on our local stages.  We read 8 plays in all, including Titus Andronicus, Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ENGL 3233 001/60812 M W 1:10p - 4:00p
411 HAMILTON HALL
Douglas Pfeiffer 3 Open
Social and Political Philosophy
PHIL S3751Q 3 points.

Six major concepts of political philosophy including authority, rights, equality, justice, liberty and democracy are examined in three different ways. First the conceptual issues are analyzed through contemporary essays on these topics by authors like Peters, Hart, Williams, Berlin, Rawls and Schumpeter. Second the classical sources on these topics are discussed through readings from Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Marx, Plato, Mill and Rousseau. Third some attention is paid to relevant contexts of application of these concepts in political society, including such political movements as anarchism, international human rights, conservative, liberal, and Marxist economic policies as well as competing models of democracy.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PHIL 3751 002/68911 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
325 PUPIN LABORATORIES
Shivani Radhakrishnan 3 Open
Social Psychology
PSYC S2630Q 3 points.

Surveys important methods, findings, and theories in the study of social influences on behavior. Emphasizes different perspectives on the relation between individuals and society.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 2630 001/63244 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
603 HAMILTON HALL
Joshua Feinberg 3 Open
Social Theory
SOCI S3000Q 3 points.

This course is required for all sociology majors, but open to all students. Theoretical accounts of the rise and transformations of modern society in the19th and 20th centuries.  Theories studied include those of Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Max Weber, Roberto Michels. Selected topics: individual, society, and polity; economy, class, and status: organization and ideology; religion and society; moral and instrumental action. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/68547 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
116 KNOX HALL
Kathleen Griesbach 3 Open
Statistical Inference
STAT S4204Q 3 points.

Calculus-based introduction to the theory of statistics. Useful distributions, law of large numbers and central limit theorem, point estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, maximum likelihood, likelihood ratio tests, nonparametric procedures, theory of least squares and analysis of variance.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
STAT 4204 001/62463 M Tu W Th 6:15p - 7:50p
312 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Ji Meng Loh 3 Open
Strategic Intelligence and Political Decision Making
POLS S4832Q 3 points.

The interaction of intelligence and political decision-making in the U.S., other Western democracies, Russia and China. Peculiarities of intelligence in the Middle East (Israel, Iran, Pakistan).  Intelligence analyzed both as a governmental institution and as a form of activity, with an emphasis on complex relations within the triangle of intelligence communities, national security organizations, and high-level political leadership.  Stages and disciplines of intelligence process. Intelligence products and political decision-making.  The function of intelligence considered against the backdrop of rapid evolution of information technologies, changing meaning of homeland security, and globalization. Particular emphasis on the role of intelligence in the prevention of terrorism and WMD proliferation.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
POLS 4832 001/26786 Tu Th 9:00a - 12:10p
703 HAMILTON HALL
Albert Bininachvili 3 Limited Availability
The Anthropology of Islam
ANTH S3009Q 3 points.

This course centers on the constantly changing ambivalent everyday lived realities, experiences, interpretations as well as the multiple meanings of Islam and focuses less on the study of Islam as a discursive tradition. Furthermore, the course challenges stereotypes of Islam, and of people who one way or another can be called Muslims; most often perceived as a homogenous category through which all Muslim societies are imagined. The course is divided into six parts. The first part introduces the idea of “anthropology of Islam” through different readings in anthropology and various, experiences, practices, dimensions of Islam as a relationship between humans and God. In the second part, the focus is to listen to Islam and connect the different sonic bodies of Islam to power and politics. The third part interrogates preconceived ideas about Islam, gender, feminism, and agency. The fourth part studies Islam, body, sexuality and eroticism. The fifth part is concerned with Islam, youth culture, identity, belonging and rebellion. The last part critically analyzes Islam, modernity, orientalism, post-colonialism and not least today’s fear and notion of imagined enemies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 3009 001/61671 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
467 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Maria Malmstrom 3 Open
The Architecture and Development of New York City
ARCH S4365Q 3 points.

Introduction to the architectural history and neighborhood development of New York City, focusing on extant buildings erected for all socioeconomic classes and for a variety of uses. The history of architecture in all parts of the City is traced through lectures and walking tours. Requires the instructor's permission for registration after 7/3. Students requiring permission can contact trob@pipeline.com.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ARCH 4365 001/63297 M W 10:00a - 1:10p
Room TBA Building TBA
Anthony Robins 3 Open
The Interpretation of Culture
ANTH S1002Q 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 1002 002/82596 M W 5:30p - 8:40p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Neil Savishinsky 3 Open
The Science of Psychology
PSYC S1001Q 4 points.

Introduction to the science of human behavior. Topics include history of psychology, brain function and development, sleep and dreams, sensation and perception, learning and memory, theories of development, language and cognition, research methods, emotion, mental illness, and therapy.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
PSYC 1001 002/73372 M Tu W Th 10:45a - 12:50p
520 MATHEMATICS BUILDING
Karen Kelly 4 Open
The Social World
SOCI S1000Q 3 points.

Identification of the distinctive elements of sociological perspectives on society. Readings confront classical and contemporary approaches with key social issues that include power and authority, culture and communication, poverty and discrimination, social change, and popular uses of sociological concepts.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/61247 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
401 HAMILTON HALL
Adrianna Munson 3 Limited Availability
The UN and Development
INAF S6569Q 3 points.

This six week course provides an overview of the contribution the United Nations development system has made in the sphere of development. The course traces the historical evolution of the UN's contribution in the areas of development cooperation, poverty reduction, environment and climate, human rights, gender and humanitarian action. It explores the emerging role of non-state actors, in particular the private sector and civil society. The last sessions will examine in detail the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals and Agenda 2030 and the recognition that to be relevant in today's rapidly changing world, the UN must commit itself to major reform. The course will draw extensively from the practical experience of the instructor.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6569 001/25965 Tu Th 2:00p - 5:10p
501A INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Bruce Jenks 3 Open
The US Presidency from George Washington to Donald Trump
HIST S3428Q 3 points.

This lecture examines how the American presidency evolved into the most important job on earth. It examines how major events in US and world history shaped the presidency. How changes in technology and media augmented the power of the president and how the individuals who served in the office left their marks on the presidency. Each class will make connections between past presidents and the current events involving today's Commander-in-Chief. Some topics to be discussed: Presidency in the Age of Jackson; Teddy Roosevelt and Presidential Image Making; Presidency in the Roaring ‘20s; FDR and the New Deal; Kennedy and the Television Age; The Great Society and the Rise of the New Right; 1968: Apocalyptic Election; The Strange Career of Richard Nixon; Reagan's Post Modern Presidency; From Monica to The War on Terror.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3428 001/70992 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
311 FAYERWEATHER
David Eisenbach 3 Open
The Worlds of Mughal India
HIST S3803Q 3 points.

This course provides a political and social history of India from the 16th-19th century, focusing on the Mughal empire. Two central concerns: first, the Mughal regnal politics towards their rival imperial concerns within India and West Asia (the Maratha, the Rajput, the Safavid, the Ottoman); and second, the foreign gaze onto the Mughals (via the presence of Portuguese, English, and French travelers, merchants, and diplomats in India). These interlocked practices (how Mughals saw the world and how the world saw the Mughals) will allow us develop a nuanced knowledge of universally acknowledged power of the early modern world. Partially fulfills Global Core Requirement. 

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
HIST 3803 001/12260 Tu Th 1:00p - 4:10p
201B PHILOSOPHY HALL
Manan Ahmed 3 Open
United Nations & Human Rights
INAF S6552Q 3 points.

What is the UN track record in promoting and protecting human rights? This intense six-week course will examine the UN human rights standards, mechanisms, institutions and procedures established over the past sixty years and question their effectiveness. With a particular focus on the actions (or lack thereof) of the UN Security Council, the UN Human Rights Council and diverse international judicial institutions like the International Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Court, the course will illustrate, through practical case studies, the inherent challenges associated with the protection of human dignity, the enforcement of human rights and the fight against impunity.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6552 001/60395 Tu Th 5:00p - 8:10p
402B INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Michael Heller-Chu 3 Open
US Foreign Policy
INAF S6795Q 3 points.

This course examines the foundations, decision-making processes, and substance of American foreign policy, particularly as it has developed over the past fifty years. We explore the role of American political culture, the presidency, Congress, and the foreign policy bureaucracy in helping to determine America's relationship with other states and international organizations. We pay particular attention to the recurring tensions that run through American foreign policy: isolationism v. internationalism, security v. prosperity, diplomacy v. military power, unilateralism v. multilateralism, and realism v. idealism. Each week we will explore a broad theoretical/conceptual theme and then focus on a specific topic that exemplifies a practical application of the theme.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
INAF 6795 001/13858 M W 9:00a - 12:10p
405A INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
Bruce Cronin 3 Open
Women and Gender in South Asia
ANTH S4187Q 3 points.

This course is an ethnographic and historical introduction to the construction of gender and feminist theory in the South Asian context. We will focus on textual and visual material, primarily ethnographies and films, to provide a critique of normative representations of the "South Asian woman". These readings will be used to reveal the complex social and historical configurations that institute and obscure gendered experiences and representations within the colonial imagination and their colonized others. A significant motif of this course will be to develop alternative ways of knowing and understanding gender construction, sexual relations, and community formation in South Asia.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
ANTH 4187 001/21953 M W 1:00p - 4:10p
963 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
Sonia Ahsan 3 Open
"Blackness" in French: from Harlem to Paris and Beyond
FREN OC3821 3 points.

What distinctions must be made between US-black American fantasies of Paris and realities for Blacks in Paris? What are the historical linkages between black Americans and Paris? Between black Americans and black French women and men? How is this relationship different from and contingent on the relationship between the “French” and their colonial “others?” How is “blackness” a category into which all non-white racial others are conscripted? (e.g. Arab and Roma communities)? Using an internationalist (specifically transatlantic) approach and covering the 20th and 21st centuries, this course explores these and other questions over the course of the semester through a close consideration of the literature, arts, culture, history and politics emanating from or dealing with Black France. The texts and artifacts examined in this course will consider “race” as both fact and fantasy in the unique, long-historical relationship between the United States, Paris, and the wider French empire.


Please note: This course is NOT open to summer visiting students.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 3821 001/27547 Tu Th 2:40p - 3:55p
Room TBA Building TBA
Kaiama Glover 3 Open
Colonization & Post-colonial Immigration in the French Context
FREN OC3823 3 points.

Colonization and Post-colonial Immigration in the French Context :


History, Legacy and Contemporary Debates


This class will explore the political, historical and sociological aspects of (post) colonial immigration in France. We will examine specifically how immigrants have shaped the history and the construction of French society and in return were the subjects of permanent debates, exclusion and discriminatory practices. Special attention will be given to the discussion of the gap between myths, discourses and reality : while claiming for homogeneity and integration, French society remains at least partially characterized by ethnic diversity and racial or social exclusion, exemplified by the discriminations against non-European immigrations or by the sub-urban ghetto.


Post-colonial immigration is also the best entry to question the complex and often passionate relationships of France with its former colonies.


Adopting a pluridisciplinary approach, this course aimed to introduce the students to the complexity of French debates and controversies regarding post-colonial migrants, in order to enable them to participate freely to daily discussions with French people and make them have the full experience of Paris life.


The sources examined in class are manyfold : academic and scientific articles form historians, sociologists or political scientists, but also some primary sources : press (the students are asked to do a weekly press review on subject related to race and immigration), films, legal texts, historical documents or photographs. The idea is always to combine theoretical approach with empirical data and analyses.


Class visits and Field Trips


Several visits and excursion will be organized throughout the program in order to take full advantage of the students presence in Paris. This includes Museum and historical Monuments visits, Field trips in Paris and the colonial/immigration legacies, but also theater plays and, depending on the program, cinema theater or summer festivals.


All excursions are mandatory and are an integral parts of the course.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FREN 3823 001/62193 Enyi Koene 3 Open
Corporate Finance
BUSI PS4003 3 points.

  An exploration of the central concepts of corporate finance for those who already have basic knowledge of finance and accounting. This case-based course considers project valuation; cost of capital; capital structure; firm valuation; the interplay between financial decisions, strategic consideration, and economic analyses; and the provision and acquisition of funds. These concepts are analyzed in relation to agency problems: market domination, risk profile, and risk resolution; and market efficiency or the lack thereof. The validity of analytic tools is tested on issues such as highly leveraged transactions, hybrid securities, volatility in initial public offerings, mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, acquisition and control premiums, corporate restructurings, sustainable and unsustainable market inefficiencies, etc.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Discovering French Cinema
FILM OC4200 3 points.

Cinema is one of the few art forms to actually have a birthday: December 28, 1895, the night when the Lumière brothers organized the first public screening of their films in Paris. Since that time, France has been one of the essential drivers of film as art and industry: it was the first cinema to be widely exported, and the first to recognize cinema as a legitimate form of personal expression. This class will trace the development of the cinema in France from its earliest days up until its most recent developments, analyzing individual works both in terms of their use of film style and technique as well their connection to changing social and political conditions in France. Works by Jean Vigo, Jean Renoir, Jean-Luc Godard and Claire Denis, among others will be screened.


Please note: This course is NOT open to summer visiting students.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
FILM 4200 001/17066 Richard Pena 3 Open
Introduction To Marketing and Marketing Management
BUSI PS4020 3 points.

No previous background in marketing is required for the course. Introduction to the basic concepts of marketing. Students develop an understanding of, and the decision-making capabilities for, formulating marketing strategies for the complex situations that characterize real-life marketing problems.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Managing Human Behavior In the Organization
BUSI PS4010 3 points.

An introduction to and overview of major concepts of management and organization theory concentrating on understanding human behavior in organizational contexts, with heavy emphasis on the application of concepts to solve managerial problems. Behavioral issues at the individual, group, and systems levels. Lectures, discussions, case studies, simulations, and small group exercises.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Marketing Strategy
BUSI PS4025 3 points.

Students will develop analytical skills used to formulate and implement marketing driven strategies for an organization. Students will develop a deeper understanding of marketing strategies and how to implement tactics to achieve desired goals. Students will work on case study projects in both individual and a team based projects. By the end of this course you will be able to develop a marketing strategy based market assessments and company needs.

Course
Number
Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Mediterranean Venice: Living and Losing a Maritime Empire
ITAL OC4016 3 points.

Venice is today a northeast province of the Italian state. For the largest part of its history, however, the city had very little to do with the rest of the Italian peninsula; it was instead the northwestern metropolis of an Eastern Mediterranean Empire, stretching all the way to (today’s) Croatia, Albania, Greece, Cyprus and Turkey. By studying the history of Venice’s imperial past, the course aims precisely to relocate the students’ geographical and cultural perception of the city. Combining readings and documentaries with weekly walks and guided tours in the city, it invites students to explore themes such as the history of the Venetian Republic (and especially of the maritime state- stato da mar), Venice’s relations to the Ottoman world, the city’s ethnic and confessional diversity, the ‘myth of Venice’ and the fate of Venice after ‘Venice’. Visits include the Correr Museum, the Doge’s Palace, the Arsenal, the Jewish Ghetto, the Campo Dei Greci, the Church of San Giorgio degli Schiavoni, the Island of San Lazzaro degli Armeni, the Fondaco dei Turchi, and others. An one-day trip to Trieste will be optionally offered.


Please note: This course is NOT open to summer visiting students.

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Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Security Analysis
BUSI PS4040 3 points.

Students will learn about the valuation of publicly traded equity securities. By the end of the semester students will be able to perform fundamental analysis ("bottom-up," firm-level, business and financial analysis), prepare pro forma financial statements, estimate free cash flows and apply valuation models.

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Section/Call
Number
Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
Technology in Art and Visual Communication
AHIS OC4146 3 points.

From early optical instruments to Renaissance printing presses, from camera obscuras, floating on boats to portable paint tubes, from modern film cameras to laser sculptures, from computer robotics to 3D printing, technology continues to play a major role in art, and visual communication. It shapes both creative processes and production techniques in the making of visual culture and it affects and defines the status of the beholder of its manifold expressions. The course will investigate some of the milestones in the history of instruments and will take up contemporary technology to investigate the intertwined connection between man and machine in the creative world. 

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Section/Call
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Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment