Summer Sessions | Courses | Anthropology

Course information is posted for 2021. Please check back at a later time for updated 2022 course offerings.

Anthropology

The Anthropology Department is the oldest department of anthropology in the United States. The summer course offerings focus on various socio-cultural aspects of anthropology, taking into consideration cross-cultural interpretation, global socio-political concepts, and a markedly interdisciplinary approach.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021
Courses
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THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE
ANTH1002S001 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH1002S001 001/11108 Summer B Subterm Mo 05:30 PM–08:30 PM
We 05:30 PM–08:30 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Neil Savishinsky
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
INTRO TO LANGUAGE & CULTURE
ANTH1009W001 3 points.
This is an introduction to the study of the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings as expressed through language. In exploring language in relation to culture and society, it focuses on how communication informs and transforms the sociocultural environment.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH1009W001 001/00196 Summer B Subterm Tu 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Th 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gretchen Pfeil
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
ENVIRONMENT & CULTURAL BEHAVIOR
ANTH1100V001 3 points.

 This course examines the relationships between Indigenous peoples, rural communities, and the environment. As it becomes increasingly apparent that environmental disasters are inextricably tied to extractive economies, this course will focus on the historic and contemporary processes, structures, and events that gave rise to contemporary landscapes of dispossession. We will base our discussions on works written by Indigenous scholars, feminist scholars, and scholars from the global south. This course is an equivalent of ANTH UN3971 and a student cannot receive credit for both. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH1100V001 001/00169 Summer B Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paige West
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
FIELD METHOD ARCHAEOLOGY
ANTH2011X001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH2011X001 001/ Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Severin Fowles
4 Closed for Online Registration
CULTURE, SOCIETY, AND CATASTROPHE
ANTH2215V001 3 points.

Catastrophes and disasters are often seen as inherently natural crises when in reality they are both caused and affected by anthropogenic forces and their impacts are conditioned by existing social, economic, and political factors. To truly understand catastrophes, such as the incipient climate crisis, extreme weather events, and even the current coronavirus pandemic, we will examine the complex interplay between environmental and social factors through both anthropological and human rights lenses. Specifically, the course will address the social and cultural aspects of catastrophe by focusing on the climate crisis, its causes, and its impacts. First, the course will consider the phenomena of anthropogenic climate change. Second, the course will examine the theoretical and empirical literatures that have elucidated the nature of climate change as a social, as well as a biophysical, process. Finally, the course will consider how human rights and other legal regimes do or do not address the social justice and humanitarian issues created by anthropogenic climate change. This course is an equivalent to ANTH S3215 and you cannot receive credit for both courses. <gwmw style="display:none;"></gwmw>

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH2215V001 001/00149 Summer B Subterm We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
J.C. Salyer
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
ANTHROPOLOGY OF CLIMATE CHANGE
ANTH2724S001 3 points.

This course focuses on some of the present, and possible future, socio-ecological conditions of life on planet
earth. In particular we will work to understand the historic, economic, political, and socio-cultural forces that
created the conditions we call climate change. With this we will take a particular interest in the question of how
race, ethnicity, Indigeneity, class, and gender articulate with the material effects of climate change. The course
also focuses on how we, as scholars, citizens, and activists can work to alter these current conditions in ways
that foster social and ecological justice for all living beings. Although we will ground our scholarship in
anthropology, to encourage interdisciplinary and even transdisciplinary thought, weekly readings will be drawn
from across scholarly and activist canons. While becoming familiar with scholarly and activist conversations
about space and place, risk and vulnerability, and ontology and epistemology, we will work through a series of
recent events as case studies to understand causes, effects, affects, and potential solutions.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH2724S001 001/10730 Summer B Subterm We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paige West
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
The Ancient Table: Archaeology of Cooking and Cuisine
ANTH3663W002 4 points.

Prerequisites: None Humans don’t just eat to live. The ways we prepare, eat, and share our food is a complex reflection of our histories, environments, and ideologies. Whether we prefer coffee or tea, cornbread or challah, chicken breast or chicken feet, our tastes are expressive of social ties and social boundaries, and are linked to ideas of family and of foreignness. How did eating become such a profoundly cultural experience? This seminar takes an archaeological approach to two broad issues central to eating: First, what drives human food choices both today and in the past? Second, how have social forces shaped practices of food acquisition, preparation, and consumption (and how, in turn, has food shaped society)? We will explore these questions from various evolutionary, physiological, and cultural viewpoints, highlighted by information from the best archaeological and historic case studies. Topics that will be covered include the nature of the first cooking, beer-brewing and feasting, writing of the early recipes, gender roles and ‘domestic’ life, and how a national cuisine takes shape. Through the course of the semester we will explore food practices from Pleistocene Spain to historic Monticello, with particular emphasis on the earliest cuisines of China, Mesoamerica, and the Mediterranean.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3663W002 002/00216 Summer A Subterm Th 02:10 PM–04:00 PM
Tu 02:10 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Camilla Sturm
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
Politics of Recognition
ANTH3725W001 4 points.

This course examines the contemporary history of struggles for recognition, reform and revolution as articulated around the politics of recognition. The course is genealogical in spirit, beginning with a set of texts that have provided the touchstone for contemporary theory and practices of politics and then moving to more recent engagements with the same.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3725W001 001/10221 Summer A Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Povinelli
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ANTI-COLONIALISM
ANTH3921S001 3 points.
The age of colonialism, so it seems, is long over. Decolonization has resulted in the emergence of postcolonial polities and societies that are now, in many instances, two generations old. But is it clear that the problem of colonialism has disappeared? Almost everywhere in the postcolonial world the project of building independent polities, economies and societies have faltered, sometimes run aground. Indeed, one might say that the anti-colonial dream of emancipation has evaporated. Through a careful exploration of the conceptual argument and rhetorical style of five central anti-colonial texts—C.L.R. James’ The Black Jacobins, Mahatma Gandhi’s Hind Swaraj, Aimé Cesairé’s Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi’s Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth—this course aims to inquire into the image of colonialism as a structure of dominant power, and the image of its anticipated aftermaths: What were the perceived ill-effects of colonial power? What did colonialism do to the colonized that required rectification? In what ways did the critique of colonial power (the identification of what was wrong with it) shape the longing for its anti-colonial overcoming?
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3921S001 001/10869 Summer A Subterm Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Scott
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ANTHROPOLOGY OF SCIENCE
ANTH3976V001 4 points.

This course examines specific debates in the history and philosophy of science, and in science and technology studies (STS), with a view towards exploring the relationships among science, technology and society. The first half of the course engages methodological questions and theoretical debates concerning the nature of epistemology, and the significance of social interests, material agency, laboratory and social practices, and “culture(s)” in the making of scientific knowledge.  The second half delves more specifically into the ways in which sciences and technologies are both embedded in and shape contemporary social and political practices and imaginaries

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3976V001 001/00142 Summer A Subterm Mo 11:10 AM–01:00 PM
Th 11:10 AM–01:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gina Jae
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
Hybrid
INTRO TO URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH3989V001 4 points.

This seminar is an introduction to the theory and methods that have been developed by anthropologists to study contemporary cities and urban cultures. Although anthropology has historically focused on the study of non-Western and largely rural societies, since the 1960s, anthropologists have increasingly directed attention to cities and urban cultures. During the course of the semester, we will examine such topics as: the politics of urban planning, development and land use; race, class, gender and urban inequality; urban migration and transnational communities; the symbolic economies of urban space; and street life. Readings will include the works of Jane Jacobs, Sharon Zukin, and Henri Lefebvre.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3989V001 001/11190 Summer A Subterm Th 01:10 PM–04:00 PM
Tu 01:10 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Steven Gregory
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INTRO TO URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH3989VAU1 0 points.

This seminar is an introduction to the theory and methods that have been developed by anthropologists to study contemporary cities and urban cultures. Although anthropology has historically focused on the study of non-Western and largely rural societies, since the 1960s, anthropologists have increasingly directed attention to cities and urban cultures. During the course of the semester, we will examine such topics as: the politics of urban planning, development and land use; race, class, gender and urban inequality; urban migration and transnational communities; the symbolic economies of urban space; and street life. Readings will include the works of Jane Jacobs, Sharon Zukin, and Henri Lefebvre.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3989VAU1 AU1/13353 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:10 PM–04:00 PM
Th 01:10 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Steven Gregory
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH
ANTH3998W001 6 points.

Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3998W001 001/13454 Summer A Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Povinelli
Gina Jae
Firat Kurt
Brinkley Messick
David Scott
Steven Gregory
6 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH
ANTH3998W002 6 points.

Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3998W002 002/13455 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paige West
6 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS
ANTH3999X001 4 points.
Research projects and internships are planned in consultation with members of the department and work is supervised by the major’s adviser.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3999X001 001/00228 Summer A Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Camilla Sturm
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS
ANTH3999X002 4 points.
Research projects and internships are planned in consultation with members of the department and work is supervised by the major’s adviser.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3999X002 002/00256 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Brian Larkin
4 Closed for Online Registration
INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS
ANTH3999X003 4 points.
Research projects and internships are planned in consultation with members of the department and work is supervised by the major’s adviser.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3999X003 003/00259 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Severin Fowles
4 Closed for Online Registration
ART STRIKE: MUSEUM DISSIDENTS & DISSONANCE
ANTH4149W001 3 points.

In the aftermath of World War II, rebuilt (Axis) and surviving (Allied) museums presented themselves as havens from a violent world– places for quiet introspection and appreciation of modern art. As the world moved through peak decolonization of former empires in the 1970s, this concept of museums was challenged by artists who asked that the contemporary art wings of the museum be a space for active discourse about current events. In the last forty years, these trends have accelerated as community organizations focused on the contemporary museum as sites for their struggles around migrant labor (Guggenheim Abu Dhabi), reparations (British Museum), state violence (moCA Cleveland), decolonization (Brooklyn Museum), surveillance (M+ Hong Kong), arms trade (Whitney Museum), etc. On the other side, museums have also expanded staff diversity, education departments, non-profit activities, and the idea of the museum as an investor in communities. This seminar begins from the hypothesis that this change in museums comes from tectonic shifts in the ecosystem for contemporary art in each city: museums (staff, unionized labor, curators, education departments), audiences (students, general public), organizations (community boards, local organizations, artist collectives), funders (galleries, collectors, donors, grant agencies), and media (newspapers, blogs, tiktok, twitter, instagram). We will build an ethnography of contemporary art, concluding with a case study (museum, art project, artist collective, etc) researched by each student as their final project. We will read accounts from anthropology, art history, and museum studies, interspersed with documentations of art installations.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH4149W001 001/11351 Summer A Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Naeem Mohaiemen
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
Elementary Forms of Populism: Authority, Power, and Legitimacy in Contemporary Turkey
ANTH4160W001 3 points.

This course ethnographically and theoretically investigates the phenomenon of populism by zeroing in on the political constellations employed in the name of “people:" religion, ethnicity, gender, affect, power, and knowledge. Taking our departure from empirical and scholarly examples from Turkey, the course also resorts to a wide range of examples, from Latin American countries to the contemporary US. We will explicitly refrain from subscribing to a classical position about populist politics, aiming to go beyond discourse analysis in order to ethnographically examine how populist practices gain legitimacy and efficacy on the ground. We will be discussing the ways in which political, social, economic relations entangle with each other, specifically focusing on the Turkish case. Are the supporters of populist movements mistaken in their perception? What is the role of “alternative facts” in establishing political legitimacy? Can experts and scientists be alternatives to populist politicians? Are the right-wing arguments embedded in the constitution of social and material worlds that liberal, progressive movements fail to question in radical ways? Ultimately, we aim to achieve an ethnographically sensitive understanding of mass politics in our contemporary moment.  

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH4160W001 001/11502 Summer A Subterm We 12:10 PM–02:00 PM
Th 12:10 PM–02:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Firat Kurt
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ISLAMIC LAW
ANTH4282W002 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH4282W002 002/11339 Summer A Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Brinkley Messick
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
The Sovereignty of Critique
ANTH5283G001 4 points.

This is a graduate-level, interdisciplinary survey of the literature of Critical Indigenous Studies.

Indigeneity is a condition that is attached to place and notions of time, but these are not any places, they are territories that have been targeted by others for possession, and this is not any time, this is time imagined to be in the past.  So to belong to those places in the present structures life, politics and effort in particular ways, as land, waters and other forms of liveleness have been pushed to an imagined past, in an ongoing taking of territory and resources.  Indigenous scholars, activists and memoirists provide an archive of this history of dispossession but one that is also countered by resistance and refusal to the push to disappear people from land and waters.  The intellectual and political work is rooted in questions of sovereignty, jurisdiction over territory and people, and deep textual and representional and political practices of critique. This intensive course is an advanced, interdisciplinary survey of the literature in Native American Studies that roots itself in key works that speak from that critique and history of dispossession. The syllabus is formed from some anthropological classics, Native and Indigenous Studies, memoir, political theory and poetry/critique. This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates (thesis writers) with instructor permission only.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH5283G001 001/14334 Summer B Subterm Tu 04:10 PM–06:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Audra Simpson
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
RSCH IN SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHRO
ANTH9101S001 9 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH9101S001 001/12243 Summer A Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Povinelli
Gina Jae
Firat Kurt
Brinkley Messick
David Scott
Steven Gregory
9 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
RSCH IN SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHRO
ANTH9101S002 9 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH9101S002 002/12244 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paige West
9 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
RSCH IN SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHRO
ANTH9101S003 9 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH9101S003 003/13346 Summer A Subterm Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Czarina Thelen
9 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
RESEARCH IN ARCHAEOLOGY
ANTH9102G001 9 points.

Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Individual research and tutorial in archaeology for advanced graduate students.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH9102G001 001/13371 Full Trm Crs
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Brian Boyd
9 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
RESEARCH IN SPECIAL FIELDS
ANTH9105S001 9 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH9105S001 001/12245 Summer A Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Povinelli
Gina Jae
Firat Kurt
Brinkley Messick
David Scott
Steven Gregory
9 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
RESEARCH IN SPECIAL FIELDS
ANTH9105S002 9 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH9105S002 002/12246 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paige West
9 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Critical Approaches in Social and Cultural Theory
WMST2140X001 3 points.

This course examines the conceptual foundations that support feminist and queer analyses of racial capitalism, security and incarceration, the politics of life and health, and colonial and postcolonial studies, among others.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST2140X001 001/00217 Summer B Subterm Th 09:00 AM–01:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–01:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Aliza Shvarts
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
INTRO TO SEXUALITY STUDIES
WMST3125X001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3125X001 001/00229 Summer B Subterm Tu 04:00 PM–07:00 PM
Th 04:00 PM–07:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
AFFECT AND ACTIVISM
WMST3138X001 4 points.

From love to anger to disappointment to hope, political activism mobilizes emotions towards certain ends but also generates new affective states and feelings along the way. This advanced seminar will familiarize students with feminist, anti-racist and queer scholarship on affect, feelings and emotion as intrinsic to politics and as crucial for understanding how political thought and action unfold in contingent and often unexpected ways. Mixing theoretical and cultural texts with case studies, we will look at how affect permeates structures of power and domination, embodiment and identity, and collective activist projects concerned with gender and sexual liberation. Students will have an opportunity to read theories of affect as well as to “read” activist movements for affect by working with archival documents (such as zines, manifestos, and movement ephemera) and other primary sources (such as memoir, photography and documentary film).

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3138X001 001/00173 Summer A Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–01:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–01:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Orsolya Lehotai
4 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
TRANSGENDER STUDIES - THEMES AND TOPICS
WMST3225W001 3 points.

This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies. While we will read about gender variable bodies within a long historical arc, the categories of both “transsexual” and "transgender" are recent social constructions. How did the many different forms of gender variance resolve into these singular forms and what has been lost in the medical and legal narrowing of gender variance to only these forms? Can we make any connections between witches in the 17th century (often accused on the grounds of cross-gender identification), mollies and dandies in the 19th century (often marked as effeminate), inverts in the late 19th and early 20th century and later constructions that assemble under the banner of “trans*”?

Many academic disciplines-- including anthropology, history, gender studies, literary studies, and gay and lesbian/queer studies--have studied transgender identities, bodies and communities, but only very recently has the field become institutionalized in the academy as a discipline "Transgender Studies." In this course we examine the ongoing development of the concept of transgender as it is situated across social, cultural, historical, medical, and political contexts. Along the way, we will try to answer some fundamental questions: when did trans* emerge as a distinct social formation? What might be the differences between the understanding of gender variance in the second half of the 20th century and formulations of the phenomena of cross-dressing and passing and transvestism in earlier periods? Is the term "transgender" applicable to non-Western and previously occurring embodiments and practices?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3225W001 001/12129 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Jack Halberstam
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
FEMINIST THEORY
WMST3311V001 4 points.

Prerequisites: LIMITED TO 20 BY INSTRUC PERM; ATTEND FIRST CLASS

This course provides a theoretical itinerary to the emergence of contemporary queer theory and engagement with some contemporary legacies of the movement. The goal is not to be exhaustive nor to establish a correct history of queer theory but to engage students in the task of understanding and creating intellectual genealogies.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3311V001 001/12640 Summer A Subterm Th 04:00 PM–07:00 PM
Tu 04:00 PM–07:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Povinelli
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ART/WORK: SEX,AESTH,CAPTLISM
WMST3512X001 4 points.
Prerequisites: none How can performances, theatrical texts, and other art/media objects illuminate the operations of gender, sexuality, and race in global capitalism? Drawing from a range of artistic media and critical traditions, we explore how aesthetic thought can help us analyze the sexual, racial, and national character of contemporary labor and life.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3512X001 001/00174 Summer A Subterm Tu 11:00 AM–03:10 PM
Th 11:00 AM–03:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Alexander Pittman
4 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
WOMEN & SOCIETY - SEX-TRADE ECONOMY
WMST3550H001 3 points.

Prerequisites: 5 semesters of college-level French or the equivalent.  This course in taught in French.

Eligibility:  This course is open to undergraduates, graduate students, and visiting students

Based on an interdisciplinary, intersectional, subalternist and post-colonial approach, this course is a general introduction to the history, sociology and anthropology of the economy of the sex-trade in Africa, America, Asia and Europe from the early nineteenth century to today. It aims to clarify: 1) the historiographical situation by questioning and analyzing the French regulatory system and its many avatars in Europe, the United States and in the colonial world, but also questioning the backlash to this system that consisted firstly of the abolitionist (born in England in the second half of the nineteenth century) and then the prohibitionist movements; 2) The relationship between class, “race” and gender in the sex market via issues of human trafficking and sex tourism in Europe, America, Africa and Asia; 3) The socio-economic issue - and its political connections – in the economy of sex with particular attention to individuals (prostitutes versus sex workers), their voices, their legal status, and even their mobilization (rallies and demonstrations, community collectives and trade unions, political and / or literary publications), but also the many heated debates that these demands for recognition and these mobilizations have provoked in places as diverse as France, the Netherlands and India to take only three specific examples in the world covered in the course.

To enroll in this course, you must apply to the Virtual Columbia Summer in Paris Program through the Center for Undergraduate Global Engagement (UGE) herePlease note the program dates are different from the Summer Term B dates. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3550H001 001/11353 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
Independent Study
WMST3999X001 4 points.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST3999X001 001/00258 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Rebecca Jordan-Young
4 Closed for Online Registration
ADVANCED TOPICS
WMST4317W001 4 points.

This course explores transcontinental connections across Africa, Asia, and the Americas as forged in the practices and movements of peoples, in the context of global colonial and postcolonial orders. We will consider the intersections, crossings, and collaborations of different communities of the global South across these continents in the course of their social, cultural, and political struggles to shape and transform the worlds they live in. We will ask, how might different narratives of these global South connections contribute to our imagination and practice of global resistance and transformation? Topics include: colonialism, capitalism, Third Worldism, feminism

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
WMST4317W001 001/12289 Summer A Subterm Tu 04:00 PM–07:00 PM
Th 04:00 PM–07:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Bernstein
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only