Summer Sessions | Courses | Anthropology

Anthropology

The Anthropology Department is the oldest department of anthropology in the United States. The summer course offerings focus on various socio-cultural aspects of anthropology, taking into consideration cross-cultural interpretation, global socio-political concepts, and a markedly interdisciplinary approach.

Summer 2022 Session Information

  • SESSION A (First Half Term) courses are May 23–July 1, 2022
  • SESSION B (Second Half Term) courses are July 5–August 12, 2022
  • SESSION X (Full Term) courses are May 23–August 12, 2022
Courses
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THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE
ANTH1002S001 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH1002S001 001/10174 Session A Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Neil Savishinsky
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE
ANTH1002S002 3 points.

The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief systems, arts, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH1002S002 002/10175 Session B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Maxine Weisgrau
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
Personhood
ANTH3751W001 4 points.

This seminar seeks to engage with materials that question personhood. Drawing on both fictional and non-fictional accounts, we will be involved with textual and visual documents as well institutional contexts in order to revisit such notion under contemporary capitalism. We will cover topics like rites of passage and life cycle, the role of the nation state and local communities in defining a person, the relation between self and non-self, between the living and the dead. We will likewise address vicarious forms of personhood through the prosthetic, the avatar or the heteronomous. But we will also look into forms of dissipation and/or enhancement of personhood through bodybuilding, guinea-piging and pharmo-toxicities. As a whole, the course will bring to light how the question of personhood cross-culturally relates to language, performativity, religion, technology, law, gender, race, class, care, life and death.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3751W001 001/10370 Session A Mo 12:00 PM–04:00 PM
We 12:00 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Maria Jose de Abreu
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ANTI-COLONIALISM
ANTH3921S001 3 points.
The age of colonialism, so it seems, is long over. Decolonization has resulted in the emergence of postcolonial polities and societies that are now, in many instances, two generations old. But is it clear that the problem of colonialism has disappeared? Almost everywhere in the postcolonial world the project of building independent polities, economies and societies have faltered, sometimes run aground. Indeed, one might say that the anti-colonial dream of emancipation has evaporated. Through a careful exploration of the conceptual argument and rhetorical style of five central anti-colonial texts—C.L.R. James’ The Black Jacobins, Mahatma Gandhi’s Hind Swaraj, Aimé Cesairé’s Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi’s Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth—this course aims to inquire into the image of colonialism as a structure of dominant power, and the image of its anticipated aftermaths: What were the perceived ill-effects of colonial power? What did colonialism do to the colonized that required rectification? In what ways did the critique of colonial power (the identification of what was wrong with it) shape the longing for its anti-colonial overcoming?
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH3921S001 001/10177 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Scott
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
WOMEN & GENDER IN SOUTH ASIA
ANTH4187S001 3 points.

This course is an ethnographic and historical introduction to the construction of gender and feminist theory in the South Asian context. We will focus on textual and visual material, primarily ethnographies and films, to provide a critique of normative representations of the 'South Asian woman'. These readings will be used to reveal the complex social and historical configurations that institute and obscure gendered experiences and representations within the colonial imagination and their colonized others. A significant motif of this course will be to develop alternative ways of knowing and understanding gender construction, sexual relations, and community formation in South Asia.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ANTH4187S001 001/11439 Session B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Sonia Ahsan
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person