Summer Sessions | Courses | Art History and Archaeology

Course information is posted for 2021. Please check back at a later time for updated 2022 course offerings.

Art History and Archaeology

 

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information in Art History and Humanities.

 

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021

 

Courses
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DRAWING STUDIO
AHIS2001X001 3 points.
This course will explore drawing as an open-ended way of working and thinking that serves as a foundation for all other forms of visual art. The class is primarily a workshop, augmented by slides lectures and videos, homework assignments and field trips. Throughout the semester, students will discuss their work individually with the instructor and as a group. Starting with figure drawing and moving on to process work and mapping and diagrams, we will investigate drawing as a practice involving diverse forms of visual culture.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2001X001 001/00018 Summer B Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Irena Haiduk
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
DRAWING STUDIO
AHIS2001X002 3 points.
This course will explore drawing as an open-ended way of working and thinking that serves as a foundation for all other forms of visual art. The class is primarily a workshop, augmented by slides lectures and videos, homework assignments and field trips. Throughout the semester, students will discuss their work individually with the instructor and as a group. Starting with figure drawing and moving on to process work and mapping and diagrams, we will investigate drawing as a practice involving diverse forms of visual culture.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2001X002 002/00207 Summer B Subterm We 12:10 PM–03:00 PM
Mo 12:10 PM–03:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ada Potter
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
FREESTYLE/DISPLCEMNT CONT ART
AHIS2018X001 3 points.
;Freestyle,; the important 2001exhibition held at the Studio Museum in Harlem in New York, helped usher a generation of artists into public discourse and scrutiny. The exhibition highlighted a cacophony of influences, histories, and art tendencies. The wide array of artworks and approaches to art making that it put on display challenged the art world and questioned conventional thinking about art made by artists of color in the twenty-first century. Taking the Freestyle exhibition as a point of departure, this course will explore a series of questions including: How do the after-effects of displacement radically change an artists way of making art? What kind of impact have contemporary notions of diaspora, migration and exile have on the new art practices? What insights do these new practices and the objects and performances that result from them produce? We will study the visual art practices related to this trajectory and the exhibitions that contextualize them. At the same time, the course will challenge students to experiment and construct artworks from their own subjectivities in ways that intersect with the questions and concepts that arise from the investigation.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2018X001 001/00213 Summer B Subterm Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Connie Choi
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
In-Person
GORE & VIOLENCE IN GREEK ART
AHIS2102W001 3 points.

Severed heads of young boys thrown at enemies, necks of virginal maidens slashed by warriors’ swords, children stabbed to death by their own mothers, tongues of raped women cut by the abusers: these are not the images one expects to encounter in Greek art, which is still almost exclusively and rather anachronistically associated with beauty, symmetry, and formal perfection. And yet, violent themes of death and abuse in all their gory details populate the world of Greek images from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Aim of the course is to offer an alternative – more ‘realistic’ – view of ancient Greek art and understand its violence and goriness as parts of its (at least) two faces; to add, as it were, the lightless night of violence to the luminous day of the athletic, heroic, and divine realms.Violence in art will be placed in a broader political, social, historical, and intellectual context. In addition, violence in art will be understood as a powerful visual means for the construction and de-construction or even destruction of images of dangerous Otherness: the aggressive barbarian (Persians), the uncontrolled nature outside the constraints of the polis (Centaurs), and the all too powerful or independent female (Amazons).

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2102W001 001/11495 Summer A Subterm Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ioannis Mylonopoulos
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
MASTERS OF THE BAROQUE
AHIS2314S001 3 points.
This course examines three masters of European Baroque art—Gianlorenzo Bernini (1598-1680), Diego Velázquez (1599-1660), and Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669)—artists who are all well represented in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through classroom discussions and museum visits, we will examine Baroque art as part of a continuing and developing accumulation of forms and ideas throughout the 17th century, and consider the impact these artists had on their contemporaries and in ensuing centuries. Roughly half of the class sessions take place at the Metropolitan Museum, a luxury that allows for close, firsthand analysis of art, but it is not an art appreciation course. It is a history course concerned with a study of ideas, artists, and visual facts and their application to emerging art forms within their cultural-historical context. In addition to developing a critical eye, the class is intended to develop analytical thinking and communication skills as well as knowledge of the subject matter.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2314S001 001/11185 Summer B Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lindsey Schneider
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Twentieth-Century Architecture
AHIS2427W001 3 points.

This course examines some of the key moments of architectural modernity in the twentieth century in an attempt to understand how architecture participated in the making of a new world order. It follows the lead of recent scholarship that has been undoing the assumption that modern twentieth-century architecture is a coherent enterprise that should be understood through avant-gardist movements. Instead, architectural modernity is presented in this course as a multivalent, and even contradictory, entity that has nonetheless had profound impact on modernity. Rather than attempting to be geographically comprehensive, it focuses on the interdependencies between the Global North and the South; instead of being strictly chronological, it is arranged around a constellation of themes that are explored through a handful of projects and texts. Reading primary sources from the period under examination is a crucial part of the course.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2427W001 001/12149 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Zeynep Celik Alexander
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
THE ARTS OF CHINA
AHIS2600V001 3 points.

This course introduces major forms of Chinese art from the Neolithic period to the present.  It stresses the materials and processes of bronze casting, the development of representational art, principles of text illustration, calligraphy, landscape painting, imperial patronage, and the role of the visual arts in elite culture.  Works of Chinese art in the Metropolitan Museum of Art will receive special attention, as you will be able to study these closely online and see the real things at the museum.  Throughout the course we will attempt to study not only the history of Chinese art but also how that history has been written, both in China and in the West. Please note that students will be required to keep their webcams on throughout the class sessions. We will take appropriate breaks.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2600V001 001/10642 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Robert Harrist
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
Chinese Painting of the Song Dynasty (960-1279)
AHIS2614W001 3 points.

An intensive examination of paintings of the Song dynasty (960-1270) focusing on works in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Topics covered will include the genres of landscape, birds and flowers, and Buddhist and Daoist figures, the emergence of painting by scholar-amateurs, and relationships between words and images. Students will read translations from Chinese texts on painting as well as poems and other literature that illuminate responses of the original viewers to the works we will study.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS2614W001 001/12551 Summer B Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Robert Harrist
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
INTRO LIT/METHODS OF ART HIST
AHIS3000W001 3 points.

Required course for department majors. Not open to Barnard or Continuing Education students. Students must receive instructors permission. Introduction to different methodological approaches to the study of art and visual culture. Majors are encouraged to take the colloquium during their junior year.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3000W001 001/12107 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Meredith Gamer
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
EVAL THE EVID OF AUTHENTICITY
AHIS3010S001 4 points.
The adjudged authenticity of a work of art is fundamental in determining its value as a commodity on the art market or, for example, in property claim disputes or in issues of cultural property restitution. Using case studies some straightforward and others extremely vexing--this course examines the many ways in which authenticity is measured through the use of provenance and art historical research, connoisseurship, and forensic resources. From within the broader topics, finer issues will also be explored, among them, the hierarchy of attribution, condition and conservation, copies and reproductions, the period eye and the style of the marketplace.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3010S001 001/11188 Summer B Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lynn Catterson
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Hellenistic Sculpture: Intellectuals, Gods, Kings & Fishermen
AHIS3100W001 3 points.

Obsession with the Classical often kept us from looking at the Hellenistic period with its artistic achievements as a time of innovation and\ experimentation in art. In Hellenistic times, new cultural and artistic centers arose besides Athens: Alexandria in Egypt, Antiocheia and Pergamon in Asia Minor, or Rhodes. Especially in sculpture, artists and patrons demonstrated an unprecedented interest in subjects such as ugly old women, working peasants, slaves with disfigured bodies, or non-Greeks. The seminar will study the sculpture of the Hellenistic period as an extremely imaginative and dynamic artistic expression without the Classical bias. In addition, it will look into the societal conditions that allowed this multi-cultural and rather inclusive style in sculpture to be created. The styles of the various Hellenistic artistic centers will be individually analysed based on representative works and then compared to each other and to the sculptural traditions of the Classical period, so that Hellenistic sculpture can be understood both as a continuation of the Classical and especially Late Classical sculpture and as an artistic, intellectual, and social creation – a creation that often went against the ideals of the past.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3100W001 001/12106 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ioannis Mylonopoulos
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
Sacred Travel, Shrines, and Souvenirs in the Medieval World
AHIS3206W001 4 points.

From antiquity to the present day, people have traveled to local or far-off sites to approach holy figures, to appeal for divine intervention, and to fulfill religious obligations. This seminar explores the material dimensions of these journeys, from the spaces entered and sights encountered to the things travelers brought or took away. Classes and (if possible) collection visits will focus on medieval Christian and Islamic shrines, although student projects may cover a larger scope.

*Visits to NYC-area museums, monuments, and/or special collections will be added if conditions permit, and assignments and schedule will change to incorporate them.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3206W001 001/11328 Summer A Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Megan Boomer
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
Modern Titian
AHIS3321W001 3 points.

In The Stroke of the Brush (1989), David Rosand introduced the authoriality of Titian’s brushwork by discussing it in the light of contemporary painting processes, such as Willem de Kooning’s Abstract Expressionism. In the exhibition Titian: Love, Desire, Death, currently at the National Gallery, London, Matthias Wivel presents the Renaissance Venetian artist as the “father of modern painting”. To what extent can a Renaissance painter be modern? How can we conceptualize that modernity? Examining Titian’s life and work in sixteenth century Venice in the light of sources, literature and technical data, the seminar will reconsider the paradigm of the modernity of the Renaissance master. Investigating what defined painting as ‘modern’ in Titian’s own period, as well as its reception in modern time, the seminar will also discuss how the theorization of contemporary societal issues could allow us to think differently about Titian’s work.

The course will be run as a seminar, with meetings devoted to discussions. Students will be responsible for the summary and introduction of the weekly readings for discussion. Each student will also be asked to carry out a research project, culminating in a class presentation and a final paper (10/ 15 double-spaced typed pages + illustrations).

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3321W001 001/11329 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Diane Bodart
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ARCH OF NYC LEISURE INDUSTRY
AHIS3409S001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3409S001 001/11189 Summer B Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Irina Oryshkevich
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
JACKSON POLLOCK & THE NY SCHOOL
AHIS3426S001 3 points.

Coming on the heels of the MoMA's blockbuster exhibit, this seminar will trace the rise and fall of Abstract Expressionism, from its pre-World War II precipitates in Europe (Surrealism) and in America (Regionalism), to the crucial moment when, as scholar Serge Guilbaut has argued, New York 'stole' the idea of modern art, and finally, through the decade when Pop Art rendered Abstract Expressionism obsolete. Although special emphasis will be given to Jackson Pollock, whose persona and work reside at the literal and figurative center of the movement, we will also look closely at works by Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, Willem DeKooning, Lee Krasner, Louise Bourgeois, Helen Frankenthaler, Eva Hesse, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Cy Twombly. Class lectures and presentations will be supplemented with trips to New York's world-renowned museums.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3426S001 001/10853 Summer B Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kent Minturn
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
NYC AND THE HISTORY OF MUSEUM
AHIS3441S001 4 points.

This course will introduce students to the history of museums and display practices through New York collections. The birth of the museum as a constitutive element of modernity coincides with the establishment of European nation states. Throughout the course of the nineteenth century, museums were founded in major European and American cities to classify objects, natural and manmade, from plants and fossils to sculpture and clothing. This course presents the alternate art history that can be charted through an examination of the foundation and development of museums from cabinets of curiosity to the collection-less new museums currently being built in the Middle East and beyond. We will consider broad thematic issues such as nationalism, colonialism, canon formation, the overlapping methods of anthropology and art history, and the notion of 'framing' from the architectural superstructure to exhibition design. We will visit a wide variety of museums from the American Museum of Natural History to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum as in-depth case studies of more general concepts. Students will have the opportunity to meet museum educators, conservators and curators through on site teaching in a variety of institutions.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3441S001 001/11191 Summer B Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Risham Majeed
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
DEATH DRIVE 3000
AHIS3666X001 3 points.

“The aim of all life is death,” Sigmund Freud’s historic words do not appear strange today. Under siege of the perpetual breaking news cycle, the apocalypse is easy to imagine. Will it be an asteroid, a zombie virus or an all out nuclear war?

Death Drive 3000 returns to the inanimate. Through a variety of reading, writing and making projects, this seminar studies the implications of our unbound and limitless death drive. Can any viable futures be located under the regimes of such imagination, futures that do not involve disposing of ourselves? From de Sade to Malabou to Clausewitz, topics include: primary nature, partial objects, necrosodomy, dismemberment, omophagia, suicide pacts, plagues, holocausts, total war and other symptoms of our collective end.

Not for the faint of heart.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3666X001 001/00017 Summer B Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Irena Haiduk
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Hybrid
Exhibiting Modern Inuit Sculpture
AHIS3853X001 3 points.

In this seminar, students will create a digital exhibition of ten stone sculptures produced by Inuit artists working within an important artistic tradition interconnected with Indigenous-Settler interaction during the second half of the twentieth century.  Initially cultivated to bring Inuit people into the cash economy as part of a broader colonial process of disrupting seasonal migrations and subsistence lifeways, modern Inuit sculpture has developed in ways that increasingly center community leadership and assertions of artistic and cultural sovereignty in the face of environmental, economic, political and aesthetic change.  The assignments for this class foreground writings, films, and artworks by Inuit scholars, artists, and community leaders. In preparation of the exhibition, we will and also work closely with the Brooklyn Museum staff to gain an understanding of their collection of Inuit sculpture and the staff roles in caring for it.  

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3853X001 001/00016 Summer A Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Fr 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Hutchinson
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Hybrid
SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH
AHIS3999Q001 6 points.

Prerequisites: the departmental consultant or director of undergraduate studies permission, and the instructors permission. Independent research and the writing of an essay under supervision of a member of the Art History Department. Only one independent study may be counted toward the major.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS3999Q001 001/14417 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Hutchinson
6 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
PROBLEMS IN CURATING
AHIS8006S001 3 points.

The aim of this seminar is to introduce graduate students to questions that guide the work of curators. It is intended not only to allow prospective curators the opportunity to build relevant skills but also to expose those interested in an academic career to a different mode of art history that allows them t. The course will be organized around a specific exhibition entitled The Way We Remember: Fritz Koenig’s Sphere, 9/11, and the Politics of Memory, scheduled to be on view at the Wallach Art Gallery from September 10–November 14, 2021, on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of 9/11.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHIS8006S001 001/12904 Summer A Subterm Th 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Tu 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Holger Klein
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
COLLOQUIUM ON MAJOR TEXTS
AHUM1399V002 4 points.

Readings in translation and discussion of texts of Middle Eastern and Indian origin. Readings may include the Quran, Islamic philosophy, Sufi poetry, the Upanishads, Buddhist sutras, the Bhagavad Gita, Indian epics and drama, and Gandhis Autobiography.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM1399V002 002/12881 Summer A Subterm Tu 12:00 PM–03:10 PM
Th 12:00 PM–03:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Mana Kia
4 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
COLLOQUIUM ON MAJOR TEXTS
AHUM1399W001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM1399W001 001/00187 Summer A Subterm Th 12:10 PM–02:00 PM
Tu 12:10 PM–02:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Nathanael Shelley
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
COLLOQUIUM ON MAJOR TEXTS
AHUM1400V001 4 points.

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM1400V001 001/00176 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Moerman
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
COLLOQUIUM ON MAJOR TEXTS
AHUM1400V002 4 points.

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM1400V002 002/10692 Summer A Subterm Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Como
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
COLLOQUIUM ON MAJOR TEXTS
AHUM1400V003 4 points.

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM1400V003 003/00184 Summer A Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Moerman
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
COLLOQUIUM ON MAJOR TEXTS
AHUM1400V004 4 points.

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM1400V004 004/13378 Summer A Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Como
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ARTS OF CHINA JAPAN KOREA
AHUM2604S001 3 points.
Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM2604S001 001/11179 Summer A Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Tu 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
We 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Th 09:00 AM–10:35 AM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Xu Tingting
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ARTS OF CHINA JAPAN KOREA
AHUM2604S002 3 points.
Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM2604S002 002/11186 Summer B Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Naomi Kuromiya
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
ARTS OF CHINA JAPAN KOREA
AHUM2604S003 3 points.
Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM2604S003 003/11187 Summer B Subterm Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Chen Jiang
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
MASTERPIECES-INDIAN ART & ARCH
AHUM2901S001 3 points.

Introduction to 2000 years of art on the Indian subcontinent. The course covers the early art of Buddhism, rock-cut architecture of the Buddhists and Hindus, the development of the Hindu temple, Mughal and Rajput painting and architecture, art of the colonial period, and the emergence of the Modern.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM2901S001 001/10854 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Mikael Muehlbauer
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
MASTERPIECES-INDIAN ART & ARCH
AHUM2901S002 3 points.

Introduction to 2000 years of art on the Indian subcontinent. The course covers the early art of Buddhism, rock-cut architecture of the Buddhists and Hindus, the development of the Hindu temple, Mughal and Rajput painting and architecture, art of the colonial period, and the emergence of the Modern.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM2901S002 002/10855 Summer B Subterm Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Seher Agarwala
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
MASTERPIECES-INDIAN ART & ARCH
AHUM2901S003 3 points.

Introduction to 2000 years of art on the Indian subcontinent. The course covers the early art of Buddhism, rock-cut architecture of the Buddhists and Hindus, the development of the Hindu temple, Mughal and Rajput painting and architecture, art of the colonial period, and the emergence of the Modern.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AHUM2901S003 003/11056 Summer B Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Charlotte Gorant
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only