Summer Sessions | Courses | Classics

Classics

The Classics Department offers a wide range of courses in ancient civilization, ancient literature, and Greek/Latin language courses. 

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information: Classical Literature, Greek, Modern Greek, and Latin.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021
Courses
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CLASSICS AND FILM
CLCV2230W001 3 points.

Considers cinematic representations of the ancient Mediterranean world, from early silent films to movies from the present day. Explores films that purport to represent historical events (such as Gladiator) and cinematic versions of ancient texts (Pasolinis Medea). Readings include ancient literature and modern criticism. This course is an equivalent of CLCV UN3230 and the student cannot receive credit for both courses. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLCV2230W001 001/00148 Summer Subterm B Tu 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
We 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Th 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Mo 10:45 AM–12:20 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kristina Milnor
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
Ethnicity, Race, and Power: East Africa in Antiquity
CLCV3000X001 3 points.

This seminar explores the changing definitions and resonances of ethnic and racial categories in an ancient context. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how Nubians and Egyptians viewed one another as well as how both Egyptians and Nubians experienced and were experienced by groups who claimed a Hellenistic or a Jewish heritage. In all of these cases, as we will see, self-definitions and cultural boundaries shifted radically according to changing power dynamics both within groups and between them.

In the course of the seminar, we will pose the following questions: How and when did groups who saw themselves as distinct from one another cooperate and intermarry? Define themselves in opposition to other groups or actively blur boundaries? Mobilize concepts of ethnicity or race to justify oppression? Engage in competition or resistance? Where, we will ask, did societies fracture and/or integrate? And what role did bicultural individuals play in cultural conversations and mediations? We will also seek to understand how our conceptions of ethnicity and race in the past are influenced not only by the biases of the present but by the methodologies we employ. How, for instance, does what we learn from archaeology compliment or complicate understandings obtained through studies of art, literature, or documentary evidence? In our discussions and investigations this semester we will learn a great deal about Northeast Africa in antiquity – but, so too, about ethnicity, race, and power.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLCV3000X001 001/00100 Summer Subterm A Mo 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Tu 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
We 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Th 10:45 AM–12:20 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ellen Morris
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Illness and Healing in the Classical world and beyond
CLCV3018W001 3 points.

In this course we will explore the experience of illness and healing in ancient Greece and Rome, with some exploration of other contexts such as Egypt, Babylonia, and Christianity down to modern Greece. The class will focus on close reading of documents, from the viewpoint of the ill and of those who try to understand illness and act on their understanding. We will pay attention to medical texts such as the diagnostic writing of the Hippocratic corpus or the treatises of Galen, but also popular texts and artifacts such as ex-votos.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLCV3018W001 001/11231 Summer Subterm A Th 09:00 AM–12:00 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paraskevi Martzavou
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
WORLDS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT
CLCV3059W001 3 points.

This seminar looks at the narrative and the historical context for an extraordinary event: the conquest of the Persian empire by Alexander III of Macedonia, conventionally known as “Alexander the Great”. We will explore the different worlds Alexander grew out of, confronted, and affected: the old Greek world, the Persian empire, the ancient near-east (Egypt, Levant, Babylonia, Iran), and the worlds beyond, namely pre-Islamic (and pre-Silk Road) Central Asia, the Afghan borderlands, and the Indus valley. The first part of the course will establish context, before laying out a narrative framework; the second part of the course will explore a series of themes, especially the tension between military conquest, political negotiation, and social interactions. Overall, the course will serve as an exercise in historical methodology (with particular attention to ancient sources and to interpretation), an introduction to the geography and the history of the ancient world (classical and near-eastern), and the exploration of a complex testcase located at the contact point between several worlds, and at a watershed of world history.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLCV3059W001 001/11194 Summer Subterm A We 09:00 AM–12:00 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
John Ma
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY
CLLT3310S001 3 points.
Introduction to and analysis of major myths in classical literature. Topics include the changing attitudes and applications of myth from Greek epic to tragedy, as well as modern approaches to myth. Readings include Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. All readings in English.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLLT3310S001 001/11197 Summer Subterm B Mo 06:15 PM–07:50 PM
We 06:15 PM–07:50 PM
Tu 06:15 PM–07:50 PM
Th 06:15 PM–07:50 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Catherine Lambert
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
HELLENISM AND THE TOPOGRAPHICA
GRKM3935S001 3 points.
Course Overview: This course examines the way particular spaces—cultural, urban, literary—serve as sites for the production and reproduction of cultural and political imaginaries. It places particular emphasis on the themes of the polis, the city, and the nation-state as well as on spatial representations of and responses to notions of the Hellenic across time. Students will consider a wide range of texts as spaces—complex sites constituted and complicated by a multiplicity of languages—and ask: To what extent is meaning and cultural identity, site-specific? How central is the classical past in Western imagination? How have great metropolises such as Paris, Istanbul, and New York fashioned themselves in response to the allure of the classical and the advent of modern Greece? How has Greece as a specific site shaped the study of the Cold War, dictatorships, and crisis?
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
GRKM3935S001 001/11198 Summer Subterm B Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Dimitris Antoniou
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
PUBLIC HELLENISM
GRKM4020W001 2 points.

This course invites students to explore the emerging field of public humanities, gain hands-on experience with its objectives, methods, and outcomes, and pursue their own independent projects that connect research on Greece with a broad public audience. The course is structured around: (1) a seminar in Hellenic Studies in which students are introduced to modern Greek history and culture through the study of texts, films, and cultural artifacts, (2) a workshop in which students are trained in the methods and tools of public-facing research (e.g., conducting oral histories, producing podcasts, curating online exhibitions), and (3) independent projects in which students work closely with Columbia faculty, fellows of the Institute for Ideas and Imagination, and public humanities partners in Greece (artists, curators, educators, and activists).

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
GRKM4020W001 001/12933 Full Term Course
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Dimitris Antoniou
2 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY LATIN
LATN1121S001 6 points.

Equivalent to Latin 1101 and 1102. Covers all of Latin grammar and syntax in one term to prepare the student to enter Latin 1201 or 1202. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LATN1121S001 001/11192 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kristina Milnor
6 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY LATIN
LATN1121S002 6 points.

Equivalent to Latin 1101 and 1102. Covers all of Latin grammar and syntax in one term to prepare the student to enter Latin 1201 or 1202. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LATN1121S002 002/12934 Summer Subterm A Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kate Brassel
6 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INTERMEDIATE LATIN II
LATN2102V001 4 points.

Prerequisites: LATN UN2101 or the equivalent. Selections from Ovids Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LATN2102V001 001/11229 Summer Subterm A Mo 01:00 PM–03:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–03:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–03:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–03:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Caleb Simone
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INTENS INTER LATN:POETRY & PROSE
LATN2121S001 6 points.
Prerequisites: LATN 1101 and 1102, or the equivalent. Equivalent to Latin 1201 and 1202. Reading of selected Latin prose and poetry with a review of grammar in one term to prepare the student to enter third-year Latin. This is an intensive course with substantial preparation time outside of class.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LATN2121S001 001/11193 Summer Subterm B Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Joseph Howley
6 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only