Summer Sessions | Courses | Earth and Environmental Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences

No courses are being offered in Summer 2022 at this time. Please check back for updates.

Summer 2022 Session Information

  • SESSION A (First Half Term) courses are May 23–July 1, 2022
  • SESSION B (Second Half Term) courses are July 5–August 12, 2022
  • SESSION X (Full Term) courses are May 23–August 12, 2022
Courses
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Dinosaurs and the History of Life
EESC1004S001 3 points.

Dinosaurs  explores how science works and provide practical knowledge about the history of life and how we have come to understand it. We learn how to analyze the evolutionary relationships of organisms and examine how dinosaurs came to be exemplars of a very successful group of organisms dominant on land for 140 million years. We will delve deeply into how direct descendants of small carnivorous theropod dinosaurs evolved into birds, still more diverse than mammals, dominating the air. The Mesozoic, a “hot-house world”, with no ice caps and was the kind of world we are hurtling towards because of our input of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, and we will look at how their time is a natural experiment for our future. The non-avian dinosaur met their end in a remarkable cataclysm discovered by detective work that we will delve deeply into as a paradigm of the scientific method  Finally, they are fun and spectacular - monsters more fantastic than any person has invented in legend or religion - and they are still with us!  

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
EESC1004S001 001/10467 Session B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paul Olsen
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
Summer Internship in Climate and Society
EESC5406G001 6 points.

Prerequisites: enrollment in the M.A. Program in Climate and Society. During the third and final term of study for the 12-month M.A. Program in Climate and Society, students must complete either a thesis or internship and simultaneously enroll in EESC W4405. The summer internship requires a minimum of 140 hours of professional participation during the Summer Term in a position related to core issues of concern to the Program. The selected position must be approved by the Director of the M.A. Program by a specified date in the Spring Semester preceding the Summer Term. The position must be substantive in nature and must constitute a practical, professional experience. Students will be evaluated on the basis of oral and written updates on the work, a student internship report to be submitted at the end of the Summer Term, and on the basis of a supervisor report form to be submitted by the site supervisor for the internship.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
EESC5406G001 001/10315 X Summer Session
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ben Orlove
Catherine Vaughan
Aisha Owusu
6 Closed for Online Registration
(no Adds or Drops)
In-Person
CAPSTONE WORKSHOP IN CLIMATE AND SOCIETY
EESC5408S001 6 points.

In this course, students will work jointly with a client organization in the climate and society field. Under the guidance of the instructors, they will take a short request from the organization for a specific product (data analysis, program development, curricular and training material, or other related items), develop a work plan, implement the work plan, and present the final product to the client. This course gives students direct experience in the co-production of knowledge in the climate and society field, a valuable skill in the contemporary world. It extends the training in the integration of natural science and social science that is a hallmark of the Climate + Society program. It includes training in the construction of a boundary object--a final product--conducted jointly with the client organization; this training includes instruction in project design, implementation and evaluation, and in communication between organizations.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
EESC5408S001 001/10316 X Summer Session
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ben Orlove
Catherine Vaughan
Aisha Owusu
6 Closed for Online Registration
(no Adds or Drops)
In-Person
An Introduction to Complex Climate Risks
EESC5415G001 2 points.

Extreme climate and weather events can lead to cascading failures that can spread within and across socio-environmental systems and sectors, often disproportionally affecting underserved communities. Climate change is projected to lead to more frequent and more severe extreme weather events amplifying the likelihood of Complex Climate Risks through multivariate, concurrent, and sequential climate extremes affecting societal systems (e.g., food, health, supply chains, finance) and critical infrastructure (e.g., water, energy, communication, transportation) in complicated ways that are challenging to anticipate and prepare for. Understanding and mitigating Complex Climate Risks in a  changing climate in compliance with climate equity and justice requires joint efforts from a broad range of scientific communities across disciplines and temporal and spatial scales - from local to global extent,  synoptic to decadal variability, and hazard characterization to detailed risk and impact assessment. In recognition that univariate risk assessments might fail to acknowledge amplified risks for societies,  from inter-related hazards and affected sectors, a complex risk perspective is increasingly required in the context of understanding climate impacts, resilience and adaptation. 

This course will provide an introduction to Complex Climate Risks by discussing recent frameworks developed to address them under current and future climate conditions. Several recent real-world events in which societal impacts were amplified by compounding climatic drivers and interactions with societal systems, leading to e.g. conflicts and migration, amplified mortality and failure of critical infrastructures are reviewed. Examples include the 2010 heatwave which caused increased mortality and harvest failures and their connection to the Arab Spring uprising a year later, the links of a year-long with the Syrian Civil and the mass migration that followed in 2015 and the 2021 February Texas cold spell that left millions without electricity and water for days under severe cold conditions in particular in poorer neighborhoods. This course will provide the students with a thorough understanding of Complex Climate Risks, the typology of different compounding hazards and statistical approaches bridging the physical and societal spheres for a more integral climate risk assessment. 

Guided by recent literature quantitative and qualitative frameworks that aim at assessing current and future climate risks to turn them into actionable information for hazard prevention and climate adaptation are discussed. The course will end with a discussion about whether the challenges to managing complex climate risk relate to challenges in assessing them, or whether existing forms of management and governance need to be reconsidered. A basic understanding of the climate system and a sincere interest of climate-societal interactions are favorable for succeeding in this course.  

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
EESC5415G001 001/12314 Session B Tu 03:30 PM–05:00 PM
Th 03:30 PM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kai Kornhuber
2 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
RESEARCH IN EARTH & ENVIR SCI
EESC9001G001 12 points.
Prerequisites: the permission of the instructor in charge of the students field of research. Individual research in the students field of specialization. The research may lead to a doctoral dissertation or to contributions for publications.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
EESC9001G001 001/12409 X Summer Session
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Mingfang Ting
12 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person