Summer Sessions | Courses | English and Comparative Literature

English and Comparative Literature

The English and Comparative Literature Department  has played a significant role in the history of literary study in the United States and abroad since its inception. The summer offerings explore various areas of interest from Shakespeare to Comic Books---there is a topic of interest for all. 

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information in English and Comparative Literature.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021
Courses
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MODERN COMPARATIVE FICTION
CLEN3208S001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLEN3208S001 001/11171 Summer Subterm B Tu 12:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 12:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Zachary Roberts
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
THE MEDIEVAL VERSION
CLEN3398W001 3 points.

The history of literature is in many ways a history of rewriting. Just as medieval writers sought inspiration in antiquity, so have writers since the Middle Ages recycled its stories and aesthetics for their own cultural moment. This course thus asks questions such as: what distinguishes “the medieval version” from antique precedents, and what can we learn about medieval culture from the juxtaposition of source and adaptation? In turn, what imaginative possibilities did the medieval world hold for later writers? Readings will range from Ovid to Chaucer, from Malory to Kazuo Ishiguro. We will focus on narratives in prose and verse. This course has a robust reading list, and since we are meeting in a compressed form, you should plan on reading approximately two hours per day to keep up with the assignments.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLEN3398W001 001/12105 Summer Subterm B Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Hannah Weaver
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Hybrid
THE 30S: METROPOLE AND COLONY
CLEN3740W001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLEN3740W001 001/10225 Summer Subterm A We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gauri Viswanathan
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
CLEN6600G001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLEN6600G001 001/10226 Summer Subterm A We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Matthew Hart
4 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
TRANSPACIFIC APPRO TO AMER LIT
CLEN6665G001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLEN6665G001 001/10227 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Denise Cruz
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
ADV ACAD WRITING FOR GS
ENGL1007ZD01 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1007ZD01 D01/10883 Full Term Course Th 09:10 AM–11:00 AM
Tu 09:10 AM–11:00 AM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Steven Lindeman
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S001 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S001 001/11245 Full Term Course Mo 08:00 PM–09:35 PM
We 08:00 PM–09:35 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Aidan Levy
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S002 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S002 002/11249 Full Term Course Th 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Tu 09:00 AM–10:35 AM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Rachel Rueckert
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S003 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S003 003/11250 Full Term Course Tu 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Th 09:00 AM–10:35 AM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ali Yalgin
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S004 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S004 004/11252 Full Term Course Th 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Tu 10:45 AM–12:20 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Vanessa Guida
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S005 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S005 005/11254 Full Term Course Tu 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
Th 01:00 PM–02:35 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Thomas Wetmore
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S006 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S006 006/12906 Full Term Course Tu 04:30 PM–06:05 PM
Th 04:30 PM–06:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Allen Durgin
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S007 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S007 007/12938 Full Term Course Th 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–02:35 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Vanessa Guida
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S008 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S008 008/12956 Full Term Course Mo 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
We 10:45 AM–12:20 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Eva Dunsky
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
UNIVERSITY WRITING
ENGL1010S009 3 points.

Prerequisites: Non-native English speakers must reach Level 10 in the American Language Program prior to registering for ENGL S1010. University Writing: Contemporary Essays helps undergraduates engage in the conversations that form our intellectual community. By reading and writing about scholarly and popular essays, students learn that writing is a process of continual refinement of ideas. Rather than approaching writing as an innate talent, this course teaches writing as a learned skill. We give special attention to textual analysis, research, and revision practices.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1010S009 009/12957 Full Term Course We 08:00 PM–09:35 PM
Mo 08:00 PM–09:35 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lilith Todd
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
FEMINIST LIFE WRITING
ENGL1021X001 3 points.

Feminists have famously claimed that "the personal is political." Accordingly, life writing--in various genres--has been an important form for feminists across generations. In this class, we will explore the different ways in which feminists have used these modes to create visions of the self, to challenge the roles and self-images given to them, and to imagine new narratives. In particular, we'll explore questions of genre: so many of these writers have developed hybrid genres or challenged the boundaries of genre in order to write their lives. Looking at examples of life writing including letters, diaries and journals, graphic memoirs, and "traditional" autobiographies, we will examine these forms through the lens of gender, race, sexuality, class, and disability. Readings are subject to change, but may include: Audre Lorde, Zami; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home; Cherrie Moraga, Loving in the War Years; Maggie Nelson, The Argonauts; Maxine Hong Kingston, Woman Warrior; poems by Adrienne Rich; Carmen Maria Machado, In the Dream House; This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color; Janet Mock, Redefining Realness, and selected shorter pieces. Additionally, we will read critical and theoretical works that will urge us to consider our primary texts from various critical approaches: including sexuality studies, critical race studies, disability studies, and transgender studies.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1021X001 001/00144 Summer Subterm B Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Meredith Benjamin
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
BAD LOVE
ENGL1022X001 3 points.

This seminar will read stories of love gone bad, of romances that end catastrophically, that damage lovers or leave victims along the way. We will illuminate the consuming fantasy of the romance genre in its quest for "true love," as well as a range of emotions – rage and revenge, narcissism and self-protection, obsession and oblivion – that surface in its wake. We will also look at shifting interpretations of "bad love," from Plato, to the Galenic theory of the humors, to the sociology of court-culture, to Freudian and finally contemporary neurobiological explanations of feelings. Students are welcome to propose texts of their own interests to open this course to the widest range of interests. In addition to seminar discussion, there will be weekly individual tutorials with Professor Hamilton as well as interviews with a neurobiologist and a psychologist.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1022X001 001/00167 Summer Subterm B Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ross Hamilton
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
BAD LOVE
ENGL1022X002 3 points.

This seminar will read stories of love gone bad, of romances that end catastrophically, that damage lovers or leave victims along the way. We will illuminate the consuming fantasy of the romance genre in its quest for "true love," as well as a range of emotions – rage and revenge, narcissism and self-protection, obsession and oblivion – that surface in its wake. We will also look at shifting interpretations of "bad love," from Plato, to the Galenic theory of the humors, to the sociology of court-culture, to Freudian and finally contemporary neurobiological explanations of feelings. Students are welcome to propose texts of their own interests to open this course to the widest range of interests. In addition to seminar discussion, there will be weekly individual tutorials with Professor Hamilton as well as interviews with a neurobiologist and a psychologist.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1022X002 002/00179 Summer Subterm B Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ross Hamilton
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
FEMINISM, SCIENCE, & REPRODUCTIVE TECH
ENGL1023X001 3 points.

Reproduction is both a biological and social process—one that is often the target of deep-seated ideas about identity, culture, science, and technology. How have contraceptives, pharmaceuticals, and other technologies shaped reproductive experiences? What does the use and distribution of these scientific innovations reveal about existing power structures and social stratification? What liberatory possibilities do these technologies enable, and what are their limitations? Course material will center work by reproductive justice scholar-activists and feminist science and technology studies scholarship, including work by Dorothy Roberts, Alexandra Stern, Emily Martin, Alondra Nelson, and others.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL1023X001 001/00145 Summer Subterm B Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Cecelia Lie-Spahn
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
EARLY CHAUCER
ENGL3034W001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3034W001 001/11180 Summer Subterm A Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Yerkes
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
THE ART OF THE ESSAY
ENGL3103X001 3 points.

Prerequisites: Students who are on the electronic waiting list or who are interested in the class but are not yet registered MUST attend the first day of class. (Formerly called Essay Writing.) Essay writing above the first-year level. Reading and writing various types of essays to develop ones natural writing voice and craft thoughtful, sophisticated and personal essays. This course is not offered to first-years. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3103X001 001/00090 Summer Subterm A Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Vrinda Condillac
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
INTRO TO POETRY WRITING
ENGL3110X001 3 points.

Writing sample required to apply. Instructions and the application form can be found here: https://english.barnard.edu/english/creative-writing-courses.

Varied assignments designed to confront the difficulties and explore the resources of language through imitation, allusion, free association, revision, and other techniques.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3110X001 001/00091 Summer Subterm A Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Alexander Dimitrov
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
RENAISSANCE DRAMA:1580-1642
ENGL3169X001 3 points.

This class offers a general introduction to English drama at the moment when it arose as a major art form. In Renaissance London, astonishingly complex plays emerged that reflected the diverse urban life of the city, as well as the layered and often contradictory inner life of the individual. This poetically rich theater was less concerned with presenting answers, and more with staging questions—about gender, race, religion, literary tradition, love, sex, authority, and class. In this course, we will try to tap into this theater’s cosmopolitan, embodied poetics by reading not only Shakespeare, but also the various other major authors who constituted this literary world: Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, the ever-popular Anonymous and others.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3169X001 001/00092 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Penelope Usher
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
THE ROMANTIC ERA
ENGL3176X001 3 points.
Romantic writers in their intellectual, historical, and political context, with reference to contemporary movements in philosophy, music, and the plastic arts. Authors include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats. An emphasis on close reading of the poetry.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3176X001 001/00193 Summer Subterm A We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ross Hamilton
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
HARLEM RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
ENGL3196X001 3 points.

In the summer of 2021, Home to Harlem will focus on the writing and collaboration of Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes in the 1920s. We will explore the cultural history and aesthetic debates that animated Harlem in the 1920s by reading them through the work (poetry, fiction, essays, plays) of Barnard and Columbia’s own, who, for a time juggled student life in Morningside Heights and the joys and challenges of being major players in the Harlem or New Negro Renaissance. Hurston and Hughes navigated the demands of being an artist and representative of "the race" in both similar and different ways. They worked together to shape the Renaissance according to their radical visions and were friends and collaborators until they famously fell out. The goal of this class is to plot the individual and collective artistic growth and experimentation of Hurston and Hughes, as well as create a digital timeline and rendering of their individual and collaborative development. To that end, this class will use either or both of the digital tools Scalar and Timeline.js in creative and collaborative ways. The class will partner with the Digital Humanities Center at Barnard for workshops on these digital tools that will be linked to all of the course assignments and final projects. No prior experience with these tools is necessary.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3196X001 001/00093 Summer Subterm A Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Monica Miller
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
THE 'GLOBAL' NOVEL
ENGL3207X001 3 points.

"Yes, globalization can produce homogeneity, but globalization is also a threat to homogeneity." --Kwame Anthony Appiah, "The Case for Contamination," New York Times Magazine, 2006

Thinking through the arguments both in favor of and against globalization, particularly in the realm of cultural productions, in this course we will discuss the "global" novel. To that end, we will read essays from The Global Novel: Writing the World in the 21st Century about works such as Americanah, Snow, and The Reluctant Fundamentalist (along with the novels themselves) to investigate what is meant by "global" and what the criteria for including novels in this categorization are. We will also consider whether there is an erasure of cultural difference and nuance in reading novels using a globalizing perspective in order to render them more approachable for a (primarily) US audience.

In order to think through and challenge this category of the global, we will also read novels that can be roughly categorized as postcolonial. We will thus consider how struggles for independence and the desire to locate one’s identity either within freshly liberated nation-states or in the process of immigrating to former metropoles could give rise to cultural and psychological anxieties. We will also consider the manner in which late-stage capitalism could indeed push toward homogenized senses of self that manifest in a category such as the "global novel" and whether arguments could be made in favor of such homogenization. Ultimately, we will think about the politics of globalization and the desire to include in or exclude from the “global” certain locations, cultural products, or peoples.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3207X001 001/00205 Summer Subterm B Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Atefeh Akbari Shahmirzadi
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
SHAKESPEARE
ENGL3233S001 3 points.

This course provides an introduction to Shakespeare through a combination of reading his plays and viewing them in performance. On the one hand, we approach each play as a written, published text: our in-class conversation consist primarily in close analysis of key passages, and, in one class period, we visit Rare Books to examine the earliest printed versions of the plays in light of English Renaissance print technology. On the other hand, we view performances of each assigned play, including the attendance as a group of at least one Shakespeare production on an NYC stage. Our semester’s through line is to trace, from his earliest plays to Hamlet, Shakespeare’s remarkable development of the techniques of characterization that have made generations of both playgoers and readers feel that his dramatis personae are so modern, real, human. We will also devote attention to exploring the value of each play in our present moment and on our local stages. We read 8 plays in all, including Titus Andronicus, Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3233S001 001/11102 Summer Subterm B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Douglas Pfeiffer
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
WALT WHITMAN AND NEW YORK
ENGL3273S001 3 points.
Walt Whitman was not the first to write about New York. But he was the first of many to let New York write him. By age 43, Whitman had composed most of his best poetry, published three editions of Leaves of Grass, and left New York only twice. How did the second son of an unsuccessful farmer, a grammar school dropout and hack writer become America’s greatest poet? This course offers a response to this perennial mystery of literary scholarship by proposing that “Walt Whitman, a kosmos, of Manhattan the son” was indeed a product of his environment. Coming of age as a writer at the same time the city was emerging as a great metropolis, he received his education and inspiration from New York itself. Course time is equally divided between discussions of Whitman’s antebellum poetry, journalism, and prose (including the newly recovered Life and Adventures of Jack Engle) in their cultural and geographical contexts, and on-site explorations that retread Whitman’s footsteps through Brooklyn and his beloved Mannahatta. Experiential learning is further encouraged through assignments based in archives, museums, and at historic sites throughout the city.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3273S001 001/11093 Summer Subterm B Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Karen Karbiener
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
FICTIONS OF LAW AND CUSTOM: WHITENESS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL3291X001 3 points.

This course examines "white" American identity as a cultural location and set of discourses and traditions with a history—in Mark Twain’s terms, "a fiction of law and custom." What are the origins of "Anglo-Saxon" American identity? What are the borders, visible and invisible, against which this identity has leveraged position and power? How have these borders shifted over time, and in social and cultural space? How has whiteness located itself at the center of political, historical, social and literary discourse, and how has it been displaced? How does whiteness mark itself, or mask itself, in literature and in larger cultural practices? What does whiteness look like, sound like, and feel like from the perspective of the racial "other"? And in what ways do considerations of gender and class complicate these other questions?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3291X001 001/00094 Summer Subterm A Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kristin Carter
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Hybrid
FICTIONS OF LAW AND CUSTOM: WHITENESS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL3291X002 3 points.

This course examines "white" American identity as a cultural location and set of discourses and traditions with a history—in Mark Twain’s terms, "a fiction of law and custom." What are the origins of "Anglo-Saxon" American identity? What are the borders, visible and invisible, against which this identity has leveraged position and power? How have these borders shifted over time, and in social and cultural space? How has whiteness located itself at the center of political, historical, social and literary discourse, and how has it been displaced? How does whiteness mark itself, or mask itself, in literature and in larger cultural practices? What does whiteness look like, sound like, and feel like from the perspective of the racial "other"? And in what ways do considerations of gender and class complicate these other questions?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3291X002 002/00203 Summer Subterm B We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kristin Carter
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1492-1852
ENGL3328W001 3 points.

The class aims to provide a broad acquaintance with classic works of American literature from the period 1492-1852. The emphasis will be on literature produced before the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Most people grow up thinking of this date as the starting point of US history: “a new birth of freedom,” as Abraham Lincoln called it. And it was, in a way. But we will be trying to understand it differently: as an end-point of the chaotic, multinational, multicultural world that was North America before the USA existed.

Most of the texts composed during the first three centuries of American literature were written by authors who assumed that North America was destined forever to remain an outpost of the British, French, and Spanish empires. Before 1776, the Americans who most often dreamed of “declaring independence” were not white men in wigs, but rather enslaved people of African descent or members of Indigenous nations fighting to retain their sovereignty against the European empires. From these peoples’ perspective, the Revolutionary War did not bring an end to the “colonial period” of American history, as white Americans began telling themselves in the 1780s and 90s. According to early US nationalists like James Fenimore Cooper, America had already achieved freedom in a legal and political sense by the year 1800; now it just had to bring its culture up to speed. In reality, however, the ink on the Constitution had hardly dried before the USA became an empire in its own right. Freedom remained an unresolved problem that creators of American literature had to work through. That ongoing process, which began in the fifteenth century and continues today, is mainly what we will be studying.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3328W001 001/11493 Summer Subterm A Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ryan Carr
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
THE NOVEL OF SLAVERY
ENGL3494W001 3 points.

In this course, we’ll be studying a subgenre of U.S. literature known as “the novel of slavery,” and we’ll be reading fictions by literary artists who attempted, in their various and distinctive ways, to come to terms with the atrocity of human bondage. In the first half of the course, we’ll read authors who wrote in the period before the legal abolition of slavery in the U.S., and whose works made direct contributions to the abolitionist cause. In the second half of the course, we’ll read authors who wrote in the years after the Civil Rights Movement, and whose works treated slavery as a historical phenomenon. But regardless of whether we’re discussing literature from the nineteenth century or the twentieth in our meetings, we’ll always be studying novels that condemn slavery as a legal, moral, and social institution; and that explore the wounds that slavery left upon individual and collective psyches; and that ask whether and how slavery’s tremendous wrongs could ever be redressed.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3494W001 001/11106 Summer Subterm A Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Austin Graham
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
SHAKESPEARE
ENGL3552W001 3 points.

This course covers a selection of plays by William Shakespeare. It will combine careful attention to the plays’ poetic richness with a focus on their theatrical inventiveness, using filmed productions of many of the plays to explore their staging possibilities. At the same time, we will place Shakespeare’s dramatic work in the historical and cultural contexts in which it was written; we will use the plays as thematic springboards for exploring the questions of politics, class, gender, and race that shaped the moment in which Shakespeare lived.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3552W001 001/11091 Summer Subterm A We 01:00 PM–04:00 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lauren Robertson
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY NOVEL: GENRE AND HISTORY
ENGL3595S001 3 points.

In the late seventeenth century, a new genre appears across Europe: the novel.  It told the stories – not of the princes and princesses – but of ordinary people on extraordinary voyages, from villages to the Metropolis, from England to Africa and the Americas. In their travels, they encountered not the dragons or giants of romance, but the people and things that made up everyday life in the eighteenth century – country houses and whorehouses, aristocrats and the merchants, pirates and slaves, and a vast array of enticing goods (shoes and coats, silks and ribbons, coffee and opium) produced in early capitalism.

Why does the novel appear?  What role does it play, in personal psychology as well as society?  Can we account for its increasing popularity as well as its transformations across the eighteenth century?  To puzzle these questions, we will place the development of the novel within the history of art, philosophy and science, as well as psychology and literary theory.  Writers include Mme. de La Fayette, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Heywood, Henry Fielding, John Cleland, William Godwin, and Jane Austen. Critical readings include selections from Benjamin, Adorno,
Foucault, Elias, Moretti, and others.  Note: we will read primarily novellas (short novels) or selections from longer novels in this course.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3595S001 001/12552 Summer Subterm B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ross Hamilton
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
SONNETS AND ELEGIES
ENGL3705W001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3705W001 001/10236 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Erik Gray
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
ANCIENT ROME IN THE EARLY MODERN THEATER
ENGL3746W001 3 points.

This course will investigate the powerful pull of ancient Rome on the artistic and political culture of early modern England. We will concentrate closely on representations of Rome as they appeared in the commercial theater at the opening of the seventeenth century, reading plays by William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, as well as masques (plays performed at court) by Ben Jonson. We will bolster our reading of this drama with an array of texts that grappled with ancient Rome through civic performance, English history, and politics, and we will explore how these ideas and ideals influenced emergent understandings of racial difference, and justifications of British imperial expansion. How, we will ask, did ancient Rome help the early modern English understand themselves: both, that is, who they were and who they weren’t?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3746W001 001/11107 Summer Subterm A Th 01:00 PM–04:00 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lauren Robertson
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
AMERICAN NATURE WRITING TO 1900
ENGL3789W001 3 points.

The course is a survey of canonical texts from the American Literary Canon, with emphasis on how these writers experienced the natural world. Some of them had to deal with extreme cold, others with tropical heat. Some of them encountered abundance, others sparsity and famine. They all encountered new life forms – from marine life to birds, reptiles and animals. They had to cope with frequent earthquakes and hurricanes, and classify newly discovered species of vegetal life. What they saw, however, was read not only through the lenses of natural history, but also theologically and politically. For some, the natural world was rich with signs sent by God for them to interpret, for others it was a political space that they organized according to the a theocratic or plantation logic. The class will therefore also pay special attention to politics, and investigate how the ecological spaces that the colonists encountered shaped their politics and ethics.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3789W001 001/11182 Summer Subterm B We 12:00 PM–04:10 PM
Mo 12:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Branka Arsic
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
FILM AND LAW
ENGL3792W001 3 points.

From its beginnings, film has been preoccupied with law: in cops and robbers silent films, courtroom drama, police procedural, judge reality show, or all the scenes that fill our media-saturated world. What do films and other audio-visual media tell us about what it’s like to come before the law, or about such substantive issues as what counts as murder, war crimes, torture, sexual abuse? How do films model the techniques that lawyers use to sway the passions of their audiences? How do they model the symbolism of their gestures, icons, images? If films and other audio-visual media rewrite legal events, what is their effect: on law? on legal audiences? How is the experience of being a film spectator both like and unlike the experience of being a legal subject? This course investigates such questions by looking at representations of law in film and other audio-visual media. We will seek to understand, first, how film represents law, and, second,how film attempts to shape law (influencing legal norms, intervening in legal regimes). The seminar’s principal texts will be the films themselves, but we will also read relevant legal cases and film theory in order to deepen our understanding of both legal and film regimes.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3792W001 001/10237 Summer Subterm A Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Julie Peters
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
19th-CENTURY “TRUE” CRIME, DETECTIVE FICTION, AND THE POLICE
ENGL3793W001 3 points.

The nineteenth century saw the emergence of a modern police force, the birth of detective fiction, the appearance of dastardly criminals in the boulevard theatre, and the rise of tabloid “true crime” journalism. It is also the era that scholars often identify with “modernity” and the emergence of “mass culture.” This course will explore the convergence of these phenomena in England, France, the U.S., and the Australian subcontinent. We will examine accounts and images of nineteenth-century “true” crime, ranging from purportedly true representations to openly fictionalized ones. In addition to reading popular fiction, we will read trial reports, police memoirs, the autobiographies of those who embraced the underworld of crime, and narratives of prison life by those who saw its violence and dehumanization first-hand. We will examine a variety of nineteenth-century genres and visual media, including flip-book photographs, magic lantern shows, the “fantasmagorie,” the diorama and panorama, and early film. Throughout the course, our principal focus will be on primary sources: their relationship to the history they represent; their rhetorical, narrative, and visual choices and meanings; their significance for the history of crime and law.

Application instructions: to apply, please email Professor Peters (peters@columbia.edu) the following: name, year, school, major, a few sentences on why you want to take the course, and a list of any relevant courses you’ve taken

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3793W001 001/12553 Summer Subterm A We 09:00 AM–12:00 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Julie Peters
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
Jane Austen and the Poets
ENGL3826S001 3 points.

Jane Austen relished contemporary verse as did her readers. Studying her perfectly structured novels together with, for example, Alexander Pope’s satiric epistles; Anne Finch’s complex and witty odes; James Thomson’s sublime neo-georgics; Samuel Johnson’s monumental imitations of Juvenal; William Cowper’s rambling loco-descriptive meditations; Samuel Coleridge’s delicate blank-verse ruminations on nature, spirit, and domestic tranquility; George Crabbe’s biting couplets about miserable village life, and many others, shall enrich our appreciation of the atmosphere in which Austen cultivated her sensibility, anticipated the taste and moral tenor of her readers, and exercised artistic control.  We will read at least three of her novels —Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Persuasion—alongside the poets she and her readers loved and whose poems they enjoyed hearing recited by characters in her novels.  Our poets include the above mentioned, in addition to Robert Lloyd, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Ann Yearsley, Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, among others.  

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3826S001 001/11099 Summer Subterm B Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Marianne Giordani
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
PARADISE LOST
ENGL3851S001 3 points.
Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. (Seminar). As the great imperial powers of Britain, France, and Belgium, among others, ceded self-rule to the colonies they once controlled, formerly colonized subjects engaged in passionate discussion about the shape of their new nations not only in essays and pamphlets but also in fiction, poetry, and theatre. Despite the common goal of independence, the heated debates showed that the postcolonial future was still up for grabs, as the boundary lines between and within nations were once again redrawn. Even such cherished notions as nationalism were disputed, and thinkers like the Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore sounded the alarm about the pitfalls of narrow ethnocentric thinking. Their call for a philosophy of internationalism went against the grain of ethnic and racial particularism, which had begun to take on the character of national myth. The conflict of perspectives showed how deep were the divisions among the various groups vying to define the goals of the postcolonial nation, even as they all sought common cause in liberation from colonial rule. Nowhere was this truer than in India. The land that the British rulers viewed as a test case for the implementation of new social philosophies took it upon itself to probe their implications for the future citizenry of a free, democratic republic. We will read works by Indian writers responding to decolonization and, later, globalization as an invitation to rethink the shape of their societies. Beginning as a movement against imperial control, anti-colonialism also generated new discussions about gender relations, secularism and religious difference, the place of minorities in the nation, the effects of partition on national identity, among other issues. With the help of literary works and historical accounts, this course will explore the challenges of imagining a post-imperial society in a globalized era without reproducing the structures and subjectivities of the colonial state. Writers on the syllabus include Rabindranath Tagore, M.K. Gandhi, B.R. Ambedkar, Mulk Raj Anand, Raja Rao, Mahasweta Devi, Bapsi Sidwa, Rohinton Mistry, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Viswanathan (gv6@columbia.edu ) with the subject heading 'Indian Writing in English seminar.' In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3851S001 001/11105 Summer Subterm B Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Julie Crawford
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Hybrid
INDIAN WRITING IN ENGLISH
ENGL3851W001 3 points.
Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. (Seminar). As the great imperial powers of Britain, France, and Belgium, among others, ceded self-rule to the colonies they once controlled, formerly colonized subjects engaged in passionate discussion about the shape of their new nations not only in essays and pamphlets but also in fiction, poetry, and theatre. Despite the common goal of independence, the heated debates showed that the postcolonial future was still up for grabs, as the boundary lines between and within nations were once again redrawn. Even such cherished notions as nationalism were disputed, and thinkers like the Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore sounded the alarm about the pitfalls of narrow ethnocentric thinking. Their call for a philosophy of internationalism went against the grain of ethnic and racial particularism, which had begun to take on the character of national myth. The conflict of perspectives showed how deep were the divisions among the various groups vying to define the goals of the postcolonial nation, even as they all sought common cause in liberation from colonial rule. Nowhere was this truer than in India. The land that the British rulers viewed as a test case for the implementation of new social philosophies took it upon itself to probe their implications for the future citizenry of a free, democratic republic. We will read works by Indian writers responding to decolonization and, later, globalization as an invitation to rethink the shape of their societies. Beginning as a movement against imperial control, anti-colonialism also generated new discussions about gender relations, secularism and religious difference, the place of minorities in the nation, the effects of partition on national identity, among other issues. With the help of literary works and historical accounts, this course will explore the challenges of imagining a post-imperial society in a globalized era without reproducing the structures and subjectivities of the colonial state. Writers on the syllabus include Rabindranath Tagore, M.K. Gandhi, B.R. Ambedkar, Mulk Raj Anand, Raja Rao, Mahasweta Devi, Bapsi Sidwa, Rohinton Mistry, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Viswanathan (gv6@columbia.edu ) with the subject heading Indian Writing in English seminar. In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3851W001 001/10238 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gauri Viswanathan
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INDEPENDENT STUDY
ENGL3871S001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3871S001 001/11393 Full Term Course
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Julie Peters
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
INDEPENDENT STUDY
ENGL3871S002 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3871S002 002/14291 Full Term Course
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Julie Peters
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
INDEPENDENT STUDY
ENGL3871S003 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3871S003 003/14318 Full Term Course
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Julie Peters
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
SENIOR SEMINAR: BAD ROMANCE
ENGL3913X001 4 points.

Romance: the quest for the one true love. This seminar will read romances that go wrong, that end catastrophically, that damage lovers or leave victims along the way. Reading bad romances will illuminate the consuming fantasy of the romance genre, as well as a range of emotions – rage and revenge, narcissism and self-protection, obsession and oblivion – that surface in their wake. We will also look at shifting interpretations of these powerful emotions, from Plato, to the Galenic theory of the humors, to the sociology of court-culture, to Freudian and finally contemporary neurobiological explanations of feelings. Students are welcome to propose texts of their own interests to open this course to the widest range of interests. Weekly individual tutorials with Professor Hamilton on weekends are offered but optional.

Readings: Euripides, Medea and Sophocles, Antigone. Malory, Sir Tristram de Lyonesse and Shakespeare, Othello. Mme de Lafayette, The Princesse de Cleves. Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights. Miranda July, The First Bad Man and Curtis Sittenfield, Prep. Finally we will view Lina Wertmuller, Swept Away by an Unusual Destiny in the Blue Sea of August, Wong Kar Wai, In the Mood for Love, and Derek Cianfrance, Blue Valentine.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3913X001 001/00095 Summer Subterm A We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ross Hamilton
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
THE ART OF THE ESSAY
ENGL3915S001 3 points.
“Learned we may be with another man's learning: we can only be wise with wisdom of our own.”― Michel de Montaigne “There is something you find interesting, for a reason hard to explain. It is hard to explain because you have never read it on any page; there you begin. You were made and set here to give voice to this, your own astonishment.” Annie Dillard, The Writing Life “Find a subject you care about and which in your heart you feel others should care about. It is this genuine caring, not your games with language, which will be the most compelling and seductive element in your style.” Kurt Vonnegut What makes the essay of personal experience an essay rather than a journal entry? How can one's specific experience transcend the limits of narrative and transmit a deeper meaning to any reader? How can a writer transmit the wisdom gained from personal experience without lecturing her reader? In The Art of the Essay, we explore the answers to these questions by reading personal essays in a variety of different forms. We begin with Michel de Montaigne, the 16th-century philosopher who popularized the personal essay as we know it and famously asked, “What do I know?,” and follow the development of the form as a locus of rigorous self-examination, doubt, persuasion, and provocation. Through close reading of a range of essays from writers including Annie Dillard, Salman Rushdie, Jamaica Kincaid, and June Jordan, we analyze how voice, form, and evidence work together to create a world of meaning around an author's experience, one that invites readers into conversations that are at once deeply personal and universal in their consequences and implications.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3915S001 001/11104 Summer Subterm B Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Wendy Schor-Haim
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
FILM NARRATIVE (SEMINAR)
ENGL3985W001 3 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course will consider Hollywood’s noir films of the 1940s and 1950s as urban narratives that simultaneously resisted and enabled the U.S.’s post-WWII superpower status and its internal ethnic and gender norms; examples of French film noir and film criticism will be used as a comparative model. Readings will include original documents, histories, and urban, gender, and film theory; films will include Double Indemnity, Gilda, The Big Heat, Cause of Alarm, The Sweet Smell of Success, In a Lonely Place, Pickup on Main Street, Panique, A Bout de Souffle (Breathless), and On the Waterfront.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL3985W001 001/10239 Summer Subterm A We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ann Douglas
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
BEOWULF
ENGL4092W001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL4092W001 001/11181 Summer Subterm A Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Yerkes
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
COMICS: READING THE MEDIUM
ENGL4526S001 3 points.
This course will offer an immersion in both the history and the language of comics, from the newspaper strips through the early comic books to today's graphic novels. Beginning with readings that offer a theoretical framework and an analytical vocabulary, students will examine and discuss the way page layout, panel composition, color, lettering, sound effects, and more help carry and shape the narrative, as soundtracks and shot composition do in film. Readings will include wordless works by Shaun Tan, classic works by Alison Bechdel, as well as many that may be less familiar. Students will analyze the American, Asian, and European approaches to comics. Guest speakers from the comics industry will aid in developing students' analytical skills. Instructor permission is required for registration after 5/28.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL4526S001 001/11095 Summer Subterm B We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Karen Green
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
MODERNISM AND MEDIA
ENGL4611W001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL4611W001 001/10240 Summer Subterm A Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Emily Bloom
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
MADE IN AMER: MAFIA IN CINEMA
ENGL4930S001 3 points.
In this course (whose title is taken from the name of the final episode of The Sopranos) we focus on America’s three greatest practitioners of the so-called “Mafia Movie.” In the first half of the course we examine representations of Mafia in the films of Coppola and Scorsese; in the second half, we perform a comprehensive reading of The Sopranos, a serial that redefined not only the gangster genre, but the aesthetic possibilities of television itself. In addition to our close-readings of the primary cinematic texts, we will pay attention to literary, historical, and anthropological sources on Mafia, both in America and in Italy. In the unit on The Sopranos, we will also consider connections to other contemporary representations of American gangsterism, particularly in the medium of television. Critical avenues privileged will include gender, sexuality, criminal and political economy, poetics of place, internationalism, dialect, plurilingualism and the politics of language, ethnicity and race, diaspora, philosophies of violence, philosophies of power.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL4930S001 001/11098 Summer Subterm B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Stefan Pedatella
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
MASTERS COLLOQUIUM
ENGL5005G001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL5005G001 001/10241 Summer Subterm A
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Matthew Hart
4 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
TEACHING WRITING:THEORY & PRAC
ENGL6913G001 4 points.
Prerequisites: the instructors permission. (Seminar). This course aims to contribute to your professional development while preparing you to teach University Writing, Columbia’s required first-year writing course. By the end of this course, you should have a basic grasp of the goals and structure of University Writing, the principles that inform its design, and the kinds of materials used in the course. While the course has an immediate goal—to prepare you for your fall teaching assignment—it aims simultaneously to enrich your teaching in the broadest sense. Your fall University Writing syllabus, as well as your lesson plans and homework assignments for the first eight classes, are due for review on August 1, 2016. This course will give you opportunity to prepare these materials throughout this semester with the support of the UWP directors, senior instructors, and advising lecturers. This course is the first of your ongoing professional development obligations as a UW instructor. You must successfully complete G6913 to teach in the UWP. Every subsequent semester, you will be required to attend a staff orientation, attend at least one workshop, and meet with your mentor and advising UWP director. All instructors new to the UWP must take this 1-credit, ungraded course during the fall of their first year of teaching. The course is intended to guide instructors through their first semester and emphasizes the practical application of the knowledge and expertise developed in G6913. Successful completion of the course is required for continuation as a UWP instructor.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL6913G001 001/12108 Full Term Course Mo 09:00 AM–05:00 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–05:00 PM
We 09:00 AM–05:00 PM
Fr 09:00 AM–05:00 PM
Th 09:00 AM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Aaron Ritzenberg
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INDEPENDENT STUDY
ENGL6999G001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
ENGL6999G001 001/12501 Summer Subterm A
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Anupama Rao
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only