Summer Sessions | Courses | French and Romance Philology

French

The French Department offers beginner to advanced language courses in the summer term. These include reading and translation, French language through culture, and courses in French and Francophone culture taught in English with options to read and write in French.

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information.

Summer 2022 Session Information

  • SESSION A (First Half Term) courses are May 23–July 1, 2022
  • SESSION B (Second Half Term) courses are July 5–August 12, 2022
  • SESSION X (Full Term) courses are May 23–August 12, 2022
Courses
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ELEMENTARY FRENCH I
FREN1101S001 4 points.

Equivalent to FREN UN1101. Designed to help students understand, speak, read, and write French, and to recognize cultural features of French-speaking communities, now with the help of a newly digitized audio program. Students learn to provide information in French about their feelings, environment, families, and daily activities. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video material.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN1101S001 001/10231 Session A Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Pascale Crepon
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ELEMENTARY FRENCH I
FREN1101S002 4 points.

Equivalent to FREN UN1101. Designed to help students understand, speak, read, and write French, and to recognize cultural features of French-speaking communities, now with the help of a newly digitized audio program. Students learn to provide information in French about their feelings, environment, families, and daily activities. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video material.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN1101S002 002/10232 Session A Mo 06:00 PM–08:05 PM
Tu 06:00 PM–08:05 PM
We 06:00 PM–08:05 PM
Th 06:00 PM–08:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Jeanne Devautour
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ELEMENTARY FRENCH I
FREN1101S003 4 points.

Equivalent to FREN UN1101. Designed to help students understand, speak, read, and write French, and to recognize cultural features of French-speaking communities, now with the help of a newly digitized audio program. Students learn to provide information in French about their feelings, environment, families, and daily activities. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video material.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN1101S003 003/10233 Session B Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Samuel Skippon
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ELEMENTARY FRENCH II
FREN1102S001 4 points.

Prerequisites: one term of college French or one year of secondary school French. $15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee , Equivalent to FREN UN1102. Continues the work of French S1101D and completes the study of elementary French. Students continue to develop communicative skills, narrating recent events (past, present, and future), describing daily life activities, and learning about cultural features of France and of the wider Francophone world. Following the communicative approach, students, with the help of the instructor, learn to solve problems using the language, to communicate their feelings and opinions, and to obtain information from others. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN1102S001 001/10234 Session A Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Eric Matheis
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ELEMENTARY FRENCH II
FREN1102S002 4 points.

Prerequisites: one term of college French or one year of secondary school French. $15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee , Equivalent to FREN UN1102. Continues the work of French S1101D and completes the study of elementary French. Students continue to develop communicative skills, narrating recent events (past, present, and future), describing daily life activities, and learning about cultural features of France and of the wider Francophone world. Following the communicative approach, students, with the help of the instructor, learn to solve problems using the language, to communicate their feelings and opinions, and to obtain information from others. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN1102S002 002/10235 Session B Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Hayet Sellami
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ELEMENTARY FRENCH II
FREN1102S003 4 points.

Prerequisites: one term of college French or one year of secondary school French. $15.00= Language Resource Fee, $15.00 = Materials Fee , Equivalent to FREN UN1102. Continues the work of French S1101D and completes the study of elementary French. Students continue to develop communicative skills, narrating recent events (past, present, and future), describing daily life activities, and learning about cultural features of France and of the wider Francophone world. Following the communicative approach, students, with the help of the instructor, learn to solve problems using the language, to communicate their feelings and opinions, and to obtain information from others. Daily assignments, quizzes, laboratory work, and screening of video materials.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN1102S003 003/10236 Session B Mo 06:00 PM–08:05 PM
Tu 06:00 PM–08:05 PM
We 06:00 PM–08:05 PM
Th 06:00 PM–08:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Marie-Helene Koffi-Tessio
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
FREN2101S001 4 points.

This course prepares students for advanced French language and cultures, focusing on developing correct usage through explanations and practice. Gaining a deeper understanding of the French language through readings of poems and short stories, students practice a variety of communication tasks, as they are engaged in ever more complex forms of discourse

 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN2101S001 001/10980 Session A Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Sophie Queuniet
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I
FREN2101S002 4 points.

This course prepares students for advanced French language and cultures, focusing on developing correct usage through explanations and practice. Gaining a deeper understanding of the French language through readings of poems and short stories, students practice a variety of communication tasks, as they are engaged in ever more complex forms of discourse

 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN2101S002 002/10981 Session B Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Wesley Gunter
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
FREN2102S001 4 points.

This course continues to prepare students for advanced French language and culture with an emphasis on developing highly accurate speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students examine complex topics, using the French language in diverse contexts, and read and actively discuss a wide variety of texts from France and the French speaking world.

 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN2102S001 001/10983 Session A Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elizabeth Albes
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II
FREN2102S002 4 points.

This course continues to prepare students for advanced French language and culture with an emphasis on developing highly accurate speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students examine complex topics, using the French language in diverse contexts, and read and actively discuss a wide variety of texts from France and the French speaking world.

 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN2102S002 002/10982 Session B Mo 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Tu 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
We 10:00 AM–12:05 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Katherine Raichlen
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
RAPID READING AND TRANSLATION
FREN2106S001 3 points.

Primarily for graduate students in other departments who have some background in French and who wish to meet the French reading requirement for the Ph.D. degree, or for scholars whose research involves references in the French language. Intensive reading and translation, both prepared and at sight, in works drawn from literature, criticism, philosophy, and history. Brief review of grammar; vocabulary exercises.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN2106S001 001/10241 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–03:05 PM
We 01:00 PM–03:05 PM
Th 01:00 PM–03:05 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Zachary Desjardins-Mooney
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
Blackness in French: From Harlem to Paris and Beyond
FREN3822W001 3 points.

What distinctions must be made between US-black American fantasies of Paris and realities for Blacks in Paris? What are the historical linkages between black Americans and Paris? Between black Americans and black French women and men? How is this relationship different from and contingent on the relationship between the “French” and their colonial “others?” How is “blackness” a category into which all non-white racial others are conscripted? (e.g. Arab and Roma communities)? Using an internationalist (specifically transatlantic) approach and covering the 20th and 21st centuries, this course explores these and other questions over the course of the semester through a close consideration of the literature, arts, culture, history and politics emanating from or dealing with Black France. The texts and artifacts examined in this course will consider “race” as both fact and fantasy in the unique, long-historical relationship between the United States, Paris, and the wider French empire.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN3822W001 001/10363 Session A Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Kaiama Glover
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
Postwar French Cinema and Bad Taste
FREN3945W001 3 points.

This course will chart a history of postwar cinema through exemplary films of mauvais goût, or bad tasteWhether they were explicitly banned or censured, deemed too grotesque, pornographic, or violent, or quite simply panned or labeled unwatchable, the films in this course come up against received expectations of what a film could or should . We will begin with Louis Malle’s Les amants (1958), which was famously banned in the US, and sparked an important legal debate about the nature of the pornography in the US (Judge Potter Stewart’s famous claim: “I know it when I see it”). We will move into lesser-known examples of French New Wave of the 1960s and ‘70s, notably a concert-film by Jean-Luc Godard, Sympathy for the Devil (1968)which far from serving up the raucous, blues-rock tunes of the Rolling Stones, performed an extended critique of the Vietnam War, and Agnes Varda’s documentary about the Black Panthers and her Le Bonheur (1965)a film much disliked by contemporary feminists. Our consideration of 1960s cinema will continue with Marguerite Duras’s India Song (1975)a film adored by critics but deemed almost universally unwatchable by subsequent viewers, as well as Roger Vadim’s Barbarella (1968)the quintessential pop science fiction film, which launched Jane Fonda’s career as an iconic sex symbol. We will then explore cult classics like Jean-Jacques Beineix’s hyperstylized thriller Diva (1981), part of the commercially successful cinéma du look, as well as René Laloux’s experimental animated film La Planète sauvage (1973). Exemplary of low-tech cinema of the 1990s, Hervé Guibert’s La pudeur ou l’impudeur (1992) is a homemade documentary film about succumbing to AIDS. Turning to the ‘00s and early ’10s, we will consider quasi-pornographic films like Catherine Breillat’s works, or others that were controversial for the conditions of production, notably La vie d’Adèle by Franco-Tunisian filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche. Finally, the course will close with a couple of very recent films that delve into grotesque or bizarre imagery, like Julia Ducourneau’s narratives of sexual awakening through cannibalism or a woman impregnated by a Cadillac. Bruno Dumont’s murder mystery film and TV series P’tit Quinquin, revives aspects of New Wave praxis, like that use of non-professional actors.

 

This class will also involve a couple of class field trips, to the Museum of the Moving Image (in Astoria), as well as to the Lincoln Film Center and to MoMA. Class taught in English with films in French with English Subtitles. Secondary materials in English or French, with English translations.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
FREN3945W001 001/11532 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Aubrey Gabel
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person