Summer Sessions | Courses | History

Course information is posted for 2021. Please check back at a later time for updated 2022 course offerings.

History

The History Department is one of the leading centers of historical scholarship in the world. The courses employ many different approaches to the past. Explore topics related to U.S. and global history from the Middle Ages to Present. 

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021
Courses
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PLTCS CRIME& POLICING IN U.S.
HIST2401X001 3 points.

This course will examine the historical development of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States since the Civil War. The course will give particular focus to the interactions between conceptions of crime, normalcy and deviance, and the broader social and political context of policy making.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST2401X001 001/00009 Summer A Subterm Mo 06:15 PM–07:50 PM
Tu 06:15 PM–07:50 PM
Th 06:15 PM–07:50 PM
We 06:15 PM–07:50 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Matthew Vaz
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
US INTELLECTUAL HIST 1865-PRES
HIST2478W001 4 points.

This course examines major themes in U.S. intellectual history since the Civil War. Among other topics, we will examine the public role of intellectuals; the modern liberal-progressive tradition and its radical and conservative critics; the uneasy status of religion ina secular culture; cultural radicalism and feminism; critiques of corporate capitalism and consumer culture; the response of intellectuals to hot and cold wars, the Great Depression, and the upheavals of the 1960s. Fields(s): US

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST2478W001 001/10250 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Benjamin Serby
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA, 1763-1
HIST2482X001 3 points.
How did thirteen diverse British colonies become a single boisterous but fragile new nation? Historians still disagree about the causes, motives, and meanings surrounding the founding of the United States of America. Major themes include the role of ideologies, material interests, global contexts, race, gender, and class.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST2482X001 001/00010 Summer A Subterm Tu 02:45 PM–04:20 PM
Mo 02:45 PM–04:20 PM
We 02:45 PM–04:20 PM
Th 02:45 PM–04:20 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Andrew Lipman
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
Hybrid
THE SECOND WORLD WAR
HIST3011W001 3 points.

This course surveys some of the major historiographical debates surrounding the Second World War. It aims to provide student with an international perspective of the conflict that challenges conventional understandings of the war. In particular, we will examine the ideological, imperial, and strategic dimensions of the war in a global context. Students will also design, research, and write a substantial essay of 15-18 pages in length that makes use of both primary and secondary sources.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3011W001 001/12153 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Paul Chamberlin
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
CENSORHSP/FREEDOM-EXPRESS-EURO
HIST3123S001 3 points.

In this course we examine theoretical and historical developments that gave rise to notions of censorship and free expression in early modern Europe. The role of censorship has become one of the significant elements in discussions of early modern culture. The new technology of printing, the rise national political cultures and their projections of control, religious wars and denominational schisms are some of the factors that intensified debate over the free circulation of ideas and speech.

 We will analyze categories of prohibited speech such as political, religious, and offensive to civil society. We will look at the mechanisms of censorship: who served as censors? How consistently was censorship applied? How effective was censorship in suppressing unwanted expression? What were its unintended consequences? We will look at ways in which censorship triggered significant reaction, such as martyrdom or created a culture of dissimulation, such as marranism and nicodemism.  Index, Inquisition, Star Chamber, book burnings and beheadings have been the subjects of an ever growing body of scholarship. Finally, we will ask whether early-modern censorship can be said to have had a constitutive role in the formation of modern culture. Students will be encouraged to discuss and form research projects on contemporary freedom of expression issues related to the themes raised in the class.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3123S001 001/10820 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Elisheva Carlebach
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
CONSUMER CULTURE IN MOD EUROP
HIST3327X001 3 points.

The development of the modern culture of consumption, with particular attention to the formation of the woman consumer. Topics include commerce and the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, feminine fashion and conspicuous consumption, and the birth of advertising. Examination of novels, fashion magazines, and advertising images.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3327X001 001/00182 Summer A Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lisa Tiersten
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
US PRESIDENCY WASHINGTON TO TRUMP
HIST3428S001 3 points.

This lecture examines how the American presidency evolved into the most important job on earth. It examines how major events in US and world history shaped the presidency. How changes in technology and media augmented the power of the president and how the individuals who served in the office left their marks on the presidency. Each class will make connections between past presidents and the current events involving today's Commander-in-Chief. Some topics to be discussed: Presidency in the Age of Jackson; Teddy Roosevelt and Presidential Image Making; Presidency in the Roaring ‘20s; FDR and the New Deal; Kennedy and the Television Age; The Great Society and the Rise of the New Right; 1968: Apocalyptic Election; The Strange Career of Richard Nixon; Reagan's Post Modern Presidency; From Monica to The War on Terror.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3428S001 001/11170 Summer B Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Eisenbach
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
GLOBAL HIST OF THE US MILITARY
HIST3455S001 3 points.

America's wars in context, from King Philip's War in 1675 to present conflicts in Afghanistan and the Middle East. This course charts the expansion of U.S. military power from a band of colonists to a globe-girdling colossus with over two million personnel, some 800 bases around the world, and an annual budget of approximately $686 billion - about 57 percent of federal discretionary spending, and more than the next 14 nations combined. It introduces students to the history of American military power; the economic, political, and technological rise of the military-industrial complex and national security state; the role of the armed services in international humanitarian work; and the changing role of the military in domestic and international politics. A three-point semester-long course compressed into six weeks. Syllabus is located here: http://www.bobneer.com/empireofliberty/.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3455S001 001/11215 Summer B Subterm Th 02:00 PM–05:10 PM
Tu 02:00 PM–05:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Robert Neer
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
HIST OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
HIST3535S001 3 points.

The social, cultural, economic, political, and demographic development of America's metropolis from colonial days to present. Slides and walking tours supplement the readings.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3535S001 001/11167 Summer B Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Stephen Sullivan
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
FORCE&POWER IN EARLY AMERICA
HIST3549X001 3 points.
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Coercion, war, rape, murder, and riots are common in American History from the European invasion to the Civil War. How did violent acts transform early American societies? Readings are a mix of primary sources and scholarship. First and second year students are welcome with permission.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3549X001 001/00011 Summer A Subterm We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Andrew Lipman
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Hybrid
Seeing Like the Sea
HIST3563W001 3 points.

This course will explore the environmental, social and political histories of the seas, with a particular focus on the modern Mediterranean. The invitation in the title – to see like the sea – is one in which you are asked to imagine how to view the world from the perspective of the seas along with the peoples, goods and ideas that crossed them.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3563W001 001/12755 Summer A Subterm We 06:15 PM–09:25 PM
Mo 06:15 PM–09:25 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Marwa Elshakry
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
HIST OF LATINOS/AS IN THE U.S.
HIST3596S001 3 points.

Even before the U.S. existed as a republic, people from 'Hispanic' and Indo-America have been incorporated into the culture, history, life, and occupational fabric of the United States. Yet, forces, figures, and factions in larger society frequently perceived Latin American heritage people as members of an 'alien' culture. Through histories of coercion, migration, labor recruitment, family networks, religious conversion, wars of occupation, economic need, political exile, education inequities, electoral participation, and unimaginative representations in film, fiction, and broader popular culture, millions of people from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador, and the rest of Latin America have somehow become American, while still remaining outside the national community. This 3-point undergraduate lecture course will examine the process of departure and arrival-the historical forces pushing and pulling people from Latin America to the United States. We will also examine how 'Spanish,' 'Latins,' 'Hispanics,' and 'Latinos' adjust, integrate, assimilate, resist, and adapt to the many forces that affect their lives in the U.S. over the last century and a half, creating new ethnic, racial and local identities in the process. By studying the experience of Latinos/as and Latin American immigrants with an eye toward patterns of second-class citizenship, identity formation, ethnic culture, community maturation, labor struggles, and social mobility, we will map out the heterogeneous mosaic of Latin American and Caribbean diasporas in the U.S. Due in large part to ongoing immigration from Mexico, the Mexican-origin population has grown appreciably from approximately 100,000 at the turn of the twentieth century to thirty-five million today (10% of the overall U.S. population and about 65% of the collective Latino community). We shall therefore pay special attention to what ethnic Mexicans, their offspring, and other Americans have had to say about the Mexican American experience and its effects on Latino/a social life as well as the nation's economy, society, and culture. Naturally, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, Hispanic Caribbean, and Central/South American communities in the United States will be examined as well. The study of Latino history is a young discipline, with many gaps and grey areas. It also exists in a complex and tense dialogue (often a monologue) within broader U.S. history. During the last two decades as the Latino population has ballooned to 56 million (1 in 6 Americans or 18% of the total population), there has also been a boom in research and writing in this field. Indeed, we will be taking advantage of some of its products, although its fruits are still uneven. This class is taught in mostly the modern period (after 1750) within United States history so it can count toward the history major or concentration. Where the course points may be applied depends on a student's field of specialization within their major or concentration. The course can also serve as three elective points toward degree progress.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3596S001 001/11218 Summer B Subterm Mo 12:30 PM–03:40 PM
We 12:30 PM–03:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Darius Echeverria
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
MOD JEWISH INTELLECTUAL HIST
HIST3644Q001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3644Q001 001/10254 Summer A Subterm We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Stanislawski
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
AFRICA AND FRANCE
HIST3779Q001 3 points.

Prerequisites: reading knowledge of French is highly encouraged. This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current ‘memory wars’ in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Group(s): B, C Field(s): AFR, MEU

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3779Q001 001/10255 Summer A Subterm Tu 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Th 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gregory Mann
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
GENDER,SEXUALITY,POWER,AFRICA
HIST3788X001 3 points.

This course deals with the scholarship on gender and sexuality in African history. The central themes of the course will be changes and continuities in gender performance and the politics of gender and sexual difference within African societies, the social, political, and economic processes that have influenced gender and sexual identities, and the connections between gender, sexuality, inequality, and activism at local, national, continental, and global scales.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3788X001 001/00186 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:00 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Abosede George
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
RACE, CASTE, AND THE UNIVERSITY: B. R. AMBEDKAR AT COLUMBIA
HIST3825X001 3 points.

B. R. Ambedkar is arguably one of Columbia University’s most illustrious alumni, and a democratic thinker and constitutional lawyer who had enormous impact in shaping India, the world’s largest democracy. As is well known, Ambedkar came to Columbia University in July 1913 to start a doctoral program in Political Science. He graduated in 1915 with a Masters degree, and got his doctorate from Columbia in 1927 after having studied with some of the great figures of interwar American thought including Edwin Seligman, James Shotwell, Harvey Robinson, and John Dewey.

 

This course follows the model of the Columbia University and Slavery course and draws extensively on the relevant holdings and resources of Columbia’s RBML, [Rare Books and Manuscript Library] Burke Library (Union Theological Seminar), and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture among others to explore a set of relatively understudied links between Ambedkar, Columbia University, and the intellectual history of the interwar period. Themes include: the development of the disciplines at Columbia University and their relationship to new paradigms of social scientific study; the role of historical comparison between caste and race in producing new models of scholarship and political solidarity; links between figures such as Ambedkar, Lala Lajpat Rai, W. E. B. Du Bois and others who were shaped by the distinctive public and political culture of New York City, and more.

This is a hybrid course which aims to create a finding aid for B. R. Ambedkar that traverses RBML private papers. Students will engage in a number of activities towards that purpose. They will attend multiple instructional sessions at the RBML to train students in using archives; they will make public presentations on their topics, which will be archived in video form; and stuents will produce digital essays on a variety of themes and topics related to the course. Students will work collaboratively in small groups and undertake focused archival research.  This seminar inaugurates an on-going, multiyear effort to grapple with globalizing the reach and relevance of B. R. Ambedkar and to share our findings with the Columbia community and beyond.  Working independently, students will define and pursue individual research projects.  Working together, the class will create digital visualizations of these projects.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3825X001 001/00012 Summer A Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Anupama Rao
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Subaltern Urbanism: South Asia
HIST3842X001 3 points.

This course asks how spatial politics intersect with economic inequality and social difference.

The course draws on the convergent yet distinct urban trajectories of cities in the global South (Bangalore; Bombay/Mumbai; Lahore; New Delhi; Dhaka) as an enabling location  for exploring broader questions of comparative and global urbanism from an explicitly South-South perspective.

That is, we ask how distinct yet connected urban forms might force us to alter our approaches to the city; approaches that are largely drawn from modular Euro-American paradigms for understanding urbanization as coeval with modernity, as well as industrialization. We do so in this seminar by focusing on people and practices—subaltern urbanity (and on those whose labor produced the modern city), as well as on spatial orders—the informal or unintended city—to ask the question: “what makes and unmakes a city?”

How might questions about built form, industrialization, capital flows, and social life and inhabitation that takes the perspective of “city theory from the Global South” shed new understanding on the history of the city, the extranational frames of colonial modernity, and the ongoing impact of neoliberalism? How can we rethink critical concepts in urban studies (precarity, spatial segregation, subalternity, economies of eviction, urban dispossession) through embedded studies of locality and lifemaking?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3842X001 001/00013 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Anupama Rao
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
Subaltern Urbanism: South Asia
HIST3842X002 3 points.

This course asks how spatial politics intersect with economic inequality and social difference.

The course draws on the convergent yet distinct urban trajectories of cities in the global South (Bangalore; Bombay/Mumbai; Lahore; New Delhi; Dhaka) as an enabling location  for exploring broader questions of comparative and global urbanism from an explicitly South-South perspective.

That is, we ask how distinct yet connected urban forms might force us to alter our approaches to the city; approaches that are largely drawn from modular Euro-American paradigms for understanding urbanization as coeval with modernity, as well as industrialization. We do so in this seminar by focusing on people and practices—subaltern urbanity (and on those whose labor produced the modern city), as well as on spatial orders—the informal or unintended city—to ask the question: “what makes and unmakes a city?”

How might questions about built form, industrialization, capital flows, and social life and inhabitation that takes the perspective of “city theory from the Global South” shed new understanding on the history of the city, the extranational frames of colonial modernity, and the ongoing impact of neoliberalism? How can we rethink critical concepts in urban studies (precarity, spatial segregation, subalternity, economies of eviction, urban dispossession) through embedded studies of locality and lifemaking?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3842X002 002/00183 Summer A Subterm Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Anupama Rao
3 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
WARS OF INDOCHINA
HIST3866W001 3 points.

Saigon and Hanoi served as competing capitals of the Republic of Vietnam (RVN) in the south and the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRV) in the north (1954-1975). They were symbols of warring states, one home to a fledgling republic, the other the seat of communist power. Since the late 19th century, they have also been sites of Vietnam’s most dramatic transformations. As such, they occupy an important place in the historiography of modern Vietnam, not least in ongoing debates over the Indochina wars, Vietnamese nationalism, and regional difference.

 

This course examines Saigon and Hanoi as social, political, and cultural spaces, and as representations of their respective states during the war. We first consider the significance of regionalism in fashioning “new ways of being Vietnamese” and examine how colonial rule reinforced those distinctions. We devote the rest of the semester to reading an array of works on the history of these cities. For the colonial period, we examine colonial urbanism, the lives of the poor, intellectuals and their ideas, as well as currents of political agitation and cultural iconoclasm. For the post-World War II period, we will focus on the distinct political cultures that took shape in the RVN and DRV. Finally, we end by looking at Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) and Hanoi in the post-war era, particularly after the Socialist Republic of Vietnam instituted sweeping economic reforms in the 1980s. Each week, we will discuss works social, cultural, and political history of Saigon and Hanoi, all the while keeping in mind their divergent trajectories in the three decades following World War II. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3866W001 001/11296 Summer A Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lien-Hang Nguyen
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
THE FUTURE AS HISTORY
HIST3914Q001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3914Q001 001/10256 Summer A Subterm Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Matthew Connelly
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INDEPENDENT STUDY
HIST3999X001 4 points.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Examines the theory and practice of transnational feminist activism. We will explore the ways in which race, class, culture and nationality facilitate alliances among women, reproduce hierarchical power relations, and help reconstruct gender. The course covers a number of topics: the African Diaspora, suffrage, labor, development policy, colonialism, trafficking, consumerism, Islam, and the criminal justice system.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3999X001 001/00234 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gergely Baics
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
MEDIEVEL SOCIETY,POL&ETHICS
HIST4061W001 3 points.

This seminar examines major texts in social and political theory and ethics written in Europe and the Mediterranean region between the fifth and the fifteenth centuries CE.  Students will be assigned background readings to establish historical context, but class discussion will be grounded in close reading and analysis of the medieval sources themselves.  The course is modeled on the Columbia College core course Contemporary Civilization and attempts to fill in the gap on that syllabus between Augustine and Machiavelli.  CC is not a prerequisite, but familiarity with the authors and themes of that course will provide useful preparation for this one.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4061W001 001/10257 Summer A Subterm Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Adam Kosto
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolutions
HIST4187W001 3 points.

The history of conflicts within and over slavery during the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, the Wars for Latin American Independence, and the campaigns to abolish slavery in the British Empire.  The seminar gives special emphasis to the evolution of antislavery and proslavery arguments, the role of war in destabilizing practices of human bondage, and choices made by enslaved men and women in moments of rapid political change.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4187W001 001/12634 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Christopher Brown
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolutions
HIST4187WAU1 3 points.

The history of conflicts within and over slavery during the American Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, the Wars for Latin American Independence, and the campaigns to abolish slavery in the British Empire.  The seminar gives special emphasis to the evolution of antislavery and proslavery arguments, the role of war in destabilizing practices of human bondage, and choices made by enslaved men and women in moments of rapid political change.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4187WAU1 AU1/14492 Full Trm Crs
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Marya Schock
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
In-Person
HIST OF MOD EAST & CENTRL EUR: Free/Unfree Labor
HIST4200W001 3 points.

The emancipation of serfs in Prussia, Habsburg empire and Russia (1780s to 1860s) coincided with the process of rejection of slavery. All over the globe, the acts of emancipation unleashed political contestations, socioeconomic experiments and population policies that targeted former serf/slaves and generations of their descendants.

Postemancipation as a predicament of the nineteenth and twentieth-century Eastern and Central Europe, in other words, the abolition of serfdom and its historical significance, is the keynote of the seminar. We will focus on pivotal issues in Eastern and Central European modernity: unfree/free labor, backwardness/progress, mass emigration vs. access to ethnic nationalism, as well as politics of class, race and ethnicity from the Enlightement to the establishment of the Communist rule. The seminar asks: what happened to the populations and economies of the region in the wake of enserfed labor? How can we historically relate postemancipation Eastern and Central Europe to postemancipation societies in other parts of the modern world? Students of modern Europe, but also those interested in modern history of bondage, labor, empire and social migrations are welcome.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4200W001 001/12859 Summer A Subterm Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Malgorzata Mazurek
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
PERSONALITY/SOC-19C RUSS THGHT
HIST4223W001 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructors permission. A seminar reviewing some of the major works of Russian thought, literature, and memoir literature that trace the emergence of intelligentsia ideologies in 19th- and 20th-century Russia. Focuses on discussion of specific texts and traces the adoption and influence of certain western doctrines in Russia, such as idealism, positivism, utopian socialism, Marxism, and various 20th-century currents of thought. Field(s): MEU

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4223W001 001/10258 Full Trm Crs Tu 04:20 PM–06:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Richard Wortman
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
CONSUMER CULTURE IN MOD EUROPE
HIST4327S001 3 points.

The development of the modern culture of consumption, with particular attention to the formation of the woman consumer. Topics include commerce and the urban landscape, changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, feminine fashion and conspicuous consumption, and the birth of advertising. Examination of novels, fashion magazines, and advertising images.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4327S001 001/11168 Summer B Subterm Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lisa Tiersten
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
THEMES IN INTELLECTUAL HIST
HIST4358W001 3 points.

“Themes in Intellectual History” offers an intensive examination of one major intellectual concept or problem in European history.  Over the past few years I have been offering seminars on the history of the modern self that focus on Montaigne.  This year’s seminar is devoted to Pascal, who was Montaigne’s most significant critic, and Kierkegaard, who developed Pascal’s ideas in a Protestant key.  These two courses together provide an introduction to two opposed streams of modern European thinking about what it means to be a particular self in relation to nature, God, and mortality.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4358W001 001/10790 Summer B Subterm Tu 10:00 AM–12:00 PM
Th 10:00 AM–12:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Mark Lilla
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
MODERN BALKAN HISTORIES
HIST4943W001 3 points.

The Balkans, Winston Churchill famously said, “produce more history than they can consume.” In this course, we will consume recent scholarship on Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania, and Albania in the twentieth century. The course will not provide a comprehensive coverage of these countries. Rather, we will address select historical key episodes and discuss how historians have addressed specific historiographical challenges: Is there such an entity as the “Balkan”? How does its history relate to European history? How do we understand nations, ethnicity, and identity? What historical perspectives in addition to political history are available to understand processes of state-building?

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4943W001 001/10260 Summer A Subterm We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Carolin Roeder
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
SPORT & SOCIETY IN EASTERN EUROPE
HIST4945W001 3 points.

This seminar examines the history of sport in twentieth century Eastern Europe including the Soviet Union. We will explore the rise of athleticism and mass sports in the context of state-building in East Central Europe; the intimate link between politics, globalization, and spectator sports; and debate how sport promised to help the revolutionary cause. Moving into the postwar era, we will question whether sport is truly war without the shooting and explore new ways in which historians conceptualize sport in the Cold War. We will also read two national histories written through the lens of football and think about how cultural ideas of sex and gender determine the course of sport history and vice versa. The course is structured around readings and discussion sections and will culminate in a final research paper. The course offers participants the opportunity to refine their professional skills as historians through in-built peer-review processes and a class-internal conference. Although there are no formal prerequisites, familiarity with the broad outlines of twentieth century Central and Eastern European history is of significant advantage.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4945W001 001/10261 Summer A Subterm Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Carolin Roeder
3 Closed for Online Registration Hybrid
Making and Knowing in Early Modern Europe: Hands-On History
HIST4962W001 3 points.

This course introduces undergraduate and graduate students to the materials, techniques, contexts, and meanings of skilled craft and artistic practices in early modern Europe (1350-1750), in order to reflect upon a series of topics, including craft knowledge and artisanal epistemology; the intersections between craft and science; and questions of historical methodology in reconstructing the material world of the past.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4962W001 001/10262 Summer A Subterm Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Pamela Smith
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
REVOL/RAD POLITICS-MARX-MAY'68
HIST4981S001 3 points.

This seminar will expose students to classical texts in political theory relating to revolutionary action, political ethics and social militancy from the Communist Manifesto to 1968. The course will explore the idea of revolutionary ethics as conceived by Western and non-Western political philosophers and militants. The discussion will stress the connection between philosophers and revolutionary leaders and the transformation of the idea of radical politics through the dialogue between these two discourses (the philosophical and the militant) and the public reception of revolutionary events in the media and commemorative writings. Authors will be examined according to their historical context and their role in the tradition of political thought and the history of radical politics from 1848 to the mid-sixties. Students will be exposed to different discourses of political militancy and radical politics and to reflect on the ethical implications of the history of radical thought and action in comparative perspective.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4981S001 001/11216 Summer B Subterm Th 02:00 PM–05:10 PM
Tu 02:00 PM–05:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Alheli Alvarado-Diaz
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
PERSP ON INT'L & WORLD HISTORY
HIST5994G001 1 points.

This course gives students the opportunity to design their own curriculum: To attend lectures, conferences and workshops on historical topics related to their individual interests throughout Columbia University. Students may attend events of their choice, and are especially encouraged to attend those sponsored by the History Department. The Center for International History and the Heyman Center for the Humanities have impressive calendars of events and often feature historians. The goal of this mini-course is to encourage students to take advantage of the many intellectual opportunities throughout the University, to gain exposure to a variety of approaches to history, and at the same time assist them in focusing on a particular area for their thesis topic.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST5994G001 001/12436 Summer A Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Line Lillevik
1 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
PERSP ON INT'L & WORLD HISTORY
HIST5994G002 1 points.

This course gives students the opportunity to design their own curriculum: To attend lectures, conferences and workshops on historical topics related to their individual interests throughout Columbia University. Students may attend events of their choice, and are especially encouraged to attend those sponsored by the History Department. The Center for International History and the Heyman Center for the Humanities have impressive calendars of events and often feature historians. The goal of this mini-course is to encourage students to take advantage of the many intellectual opportunities throughout the University, to gain exposure to a variety of approaches to history, and at the same time assist them in focusing on a particular area for their thesis topic.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST5994G002 002/12439 Summer B Subterm
Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Line Lillevik
1 Registration Block
(w/ Self-Managed Wait List)
On-Line Only
GRADUATE SEMINAR
HIST6999G001 4 points.

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Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST6999G001 001/11349 Summer A Subterm Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lien-Hang Nguyen
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONS
HIST8861G001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST8861G001 001/10263 Summer A Subterm We 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Mo 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Tu 10:45 AM–12:20 PM
Th 10:45 AM–12:20 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Madeleine Zelin
David Weiman
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
Climate and Inner Asian Empires
HIST8873G001 4 points.

Inner Asian empires, from the Huns to and Mongols and Manchus, were the political creation of pastoral nomads and other peoples who shared in their cultural sphere. Employing an interdisciplinary research approach that includes climate science, history, archaeology, anthropology and other disciplines this course will focus on case studies from different periods and regions to explore the potential impct of climate variability on their rise and fall.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST8873G001 001/10264 Summer A Subterm Tu 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Th 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Nicola Di Cosmo
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
HISTORY IN ACTION
HIST8923G001 2 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST8923G001 001/10265 Summer A Subterm Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Marwa Elshakry
2 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only