Summer Sessions | Courses | History

History

The History Department is one of the leading centers of historical scholarship in the world. The courses employ many different approaches to the past. Explore topics related to U.S. and global history from the Middle Ages to Present. 

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information.

Summer 2022 Session Information

  • SESSION A (First Half Term) courses are May 23–July 1, 2022
  • SESSION B (Second Half Term) courses are July 5–August 12, 2022
  • SESSION X (Full Term) courses are May 23–August 12, 2022
Courses
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IMMIGRANT NEW YORK
AMHS4462W001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
AMHS4462W001 001/10649 Session A Tu 12:30 PM–04:30 PM
Th 12:30 PM–04:30 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Rebecca Kobrin
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
REVOLUTION & EMPIRE: HAITI & FRANCE, 1789-1820
HIST2176W001 3 points.

Few periods in history have stirred imaginations and been debated as much as the so-called “Age of Revolution” at the turn of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Long seen through a self-righteous North-Atlantic lens, this era of (democratic) revolutions has today been decentered both spatially and conceptually to encompass other revolutionary upheavals around the globe and their twin other: empire. This course takes stock of these developments to explore how revolution and empire developed in tandem in France and Haiti, with ramifications across the Caribbean, Europe and beyond from 1789 to 1820. Topics covered include: the end of an “old” regime and birth of several new ones; the largest and most successful slave revolt in history; revolutionary politics and social transformation; the terror; Napoleon, Toussaint Louverture, and charismatic leadership; the first “total war” and new forms of empire-building; the legacies, memory, and forgetting of these events. Throughout, the course considers revolutionary upheaval and imperialism as intertwined processes driven both by determinate logics and by unintended consequences.

This course is lecture-based although students are expected to engage in short document-based discussions in class. All classes and readings will be English, and no prior knowledge of the period is required.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST2176W001 001/10296 Session A Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Thomas Dodman
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
Colonial America, Imperial America: 1776-1920
HIST2497S001 3 points.

Since independence, Americans have fiercely debated the United States’ place in the world. Was the U.S. a nascent empire or an anti-colonial state? Caught between Western Europe, its remaining colonies, and the young nations of Central and South America, the United States struck a tense balance between imperial and anti-imperial tendencies. This course examines the transformation of the United States from an insular conglomeration of states to an imperial power. Alongside political debates in Washington and diplomatic wrangling in North America, South America, and Europe this course centers western expansion as a defining feature of the United States’ internal and international identity, placing the U.S.’s violent dispossession of indigenous peoples and commitment to slavery in conversation with other formative events like the Mexican-American and Spanish-American Wars.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST2497S001 001/10297 Session B Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Joshua Morrison
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
HISTORY OF CAPITALISM
HIST3116S001 4 points.
Capitalism shapes every aspect of our daily lives. Thinkers on both the left and the right of the political spectrum agree that capitalism structures our economic, social, and political relationships. Yet, there is little agreement as to the definition of capitalism and its normative implications. The definition and interpretation of capitalism differs across time and space, always evolving in response to challenges, crises, and contradictions. The aim of this course is to provide students with analytical tools to think critically and historically about the concept of capitalism. By studying how philosophers, economists, and political theorists have defined and described the concept of capitalism throughout its history (from the early seventeenth century to the present), students will be provided with a set of terminologies and analytical frameworks that enable them to interrogate the various dimensions of capitalism. The readings in the course are selected to illustrate the fact that capitalism has always been controversial. We will read texts authored by both proponents and critics of capitalism. We will explore how various canonical figures have thought about private property, markets, money, economic growth, injustice, inequality, alienation, and socialism.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3116S001 001/10060 Session A Tu 09:00 AM–01:00 PM
Th 09:00 AM–01:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Carl Wennerlind
4 Closed for Online Registration
(no Adds or Drops)
In-Person
US PRESIDENCY WASHINGTON TO TRUMP
HIST3428S001 3 points.

This lecture examines how the American presidency evolved into the most important job on earth. It examines how major events in US and world history shaped the presidency. How changes in technology and media augmented the power of the president and how the individuals who served in the office left their marks on the presidency. Each class will make connections between past presidents and the current events involving today's Commander-in-Chief. Some topics to be discussed: Presidency in the Age of Jackson; Teddy Roosevelt and Presidential Image Making; Presidency in the Roaring ‘20s; FDR and the New Deal; Kennedy and the Television Age; The Great Society and the Rise of the New Right; 1968: Apocalyptic Election; The Strange Career of Richard Nixon; Reagan's Post Modern Presidency; From Monica to The War on Terror.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3428S001 001/10058 Session B Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
David Eisenbach
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
GLOBAL HIST OF THE US MILITARY
HIST3455S001 3 points.

America's wars in context, from King Philip's War in 1675 to present conflicts in Afghanistan and the Middle East. This course charts the expansion of U.S. military power from a band of colonists to a globe-girdling colossus with over two million personnel, some 800 bases around the world, and an annual budget of approximately $686 billion - about 57 percent of federal discretionary spending, and more than the next 14 nations combined. It introduces students to the history of American military power; the economic, political, and technological rise of the military-industrial complex and national security state; the role of the armed services in international humanitarian work; and the changing role of the military in domestic and international politics. A three-point semester-long course compressed into six weeks. Syllabus is located here: http://www.bobneer.com/empireofliberty/.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3455S001 001/10062 Session A Mo 02:00 PM–05:10 PM
We 02:00 PM–05:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Robert Neer
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
HIST OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
HIST3535S001 3 points.

The social, cultural, economic, political, and demographic development of America's metropolis from colonial days to present. Slides and walking tours supplement the readings.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3535S001 001/10059 Session B Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Stephen Sullivan
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
HIST OF LATINOS/AS IN THE U.S.
HIST3596S001 3 points.

Even before the U.S. existed as a republic, people from 'Hispanic' and Indo-America have been incorporated into the culture, history, life, and occupational fabric of the United States. Yet, forces, figures, and factions in larger society frequently perceived Latin American heritage people as members of an 'alien' culture. Through histories of coercion, migration, labor recruitment, family networks, religious conversion, wars of occupation, economic need, political exile, education inequities, electoral participation, and unimaginative representations in film, fiction, and broader popular culture, millions of people from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador, and the rest of Latin America have somehow become American, while still remaining outside the national community. This 3-point undergraduate lecture course will examine the process of departure and arrival-the historical forces pushing and pulling people from Latin America to the United States. We will also examine how 'Spanish,' 'Latins,' 'Hispanics,' and 'Latinos' adjust, integrate, assimilate, resist, and adapt to the many forces that affect their lives in the U.S. over the last century and a half, creating new ethnic, racial and local identities in the process. By studying the experience of Latinos/as and Latin American immigrants with an eye toward patterns of second-class citizenship, identity formation, ethnic culture, community maturation, labor struggles, and social mobility, we will map out the heterogeneous mosaic of Latin American and Caribbean diasporas in the U.S. Due in large part to ongoing immigration from Mexico, the Mexican-origin population has grown appreciably from approximately 100,000 at the turn of the twentieth century to thirty-five million today (10% of the overall U.S. population and about 65% of the collective Latino community). We shall therefore pay special attention to what ethnic Mexicans, their offspring, and other Americans have had to say about the Mexican American experience and its effects on Latino/a social life as well as the nation's economy, society, and culture. Naturally, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, Hispanic Caribbean, and Central/South American communities in the United States will be examined as well. The study of Latino history is a young discipline, with many gaps and grey areas. It also exists in a complex and tense dialogue (often a monologue) within broader U.S. history. During the last two decades as the Latino population has ballooned to 56 million (1 in 6 Americans or 18% of the total population), there has also been a boom in research and writing in this field. Indeed, we will be taking advantage of some of its products, although its fruits are still uneven. This class is taught in mostly the modern period (after 1750) within United States history so it can count toward the history major or concentration. Where the course points may be applied depends on a student's field of specialization within their major or concentration. The course can also serve as three elective points toward degree progress.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST3596S001 001/10056 Session B Mo 12:30 PM–03:40 PM
We 12:30 PM–03:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Darius Echeverria
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
REVOL/RAD POLITICS-MARX-MAY'68
HIST4981S001 4 points.

This seminar will expose students to classical texts in political theory relating to revolutionary action, political ethics and social militancy from the Communist Manifesto to 1968. The course will explore the idea of revolutionary ethics as conceived by Western and non-Western political philosophers and militants. The discussion will stress the connection between philosophers and revolutionary leaders and the transformation of the idea of radical politics through the dialogue between these two discourses (the philosophical and the militant) and the public reception of revolutionary events in the media and commemorative writings. Authors will be examined according to their historical context and their role in the tradition of political thought and the history of radical politics from 1848 to the mid-sixties. Students will be exposed to different discourses of political militancy and radical politics and to reflect on the ethical implications of the history of radical thought and action in comparative perspective.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
HIST4981S001 001/10057 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–05:00 PM
Th 01:00 PM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Alheli Alvarado-Diaz
4 Closed for Online Registration
(no Adds or Drops)
In-Person