Summer Sessions | Courses | Journalism and Media Studies

Journalism and Media Studies

In partnership with the Columbia School of Journalism, these dynamic undergraduate level courses focus on both the theory behind and the practice of quality journalism. Course work will include coverage of best reporting practices, including ethics, sourcing, and interview technique, as well as discussion of story structure and audience engagement, differentiated by medium.

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information.

Schedule and instructor information is posted for 2020. Please check back at a later time for updated 2021 course offerings.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021
Courses
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WAR REPORTING:THE COVERAGE OF
JOUR3019S001 3 points.

War Reporting: The Coverage of Armed Conflict explores the origins and roles of modern war reporting, examines the challenges journalists face, and discusses journalism's place in the public discourse of armed conflict and political violence, most notably terrorism. Taught by U.S. Marine corps veteran and Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and author, C.J. Chivers, class discussions will be lively and require student engagement. There will be guest lectures and seminars with leading journalists with experience in recent wars, as well discussions with security and legal professionals who assist and guide news organizations in their coverage of war. The examination of risks to journalists on conflict beats will include detailed case studies of real kidnappings and battlefield deaths, and study examples of risk mitigation and best practices in the field. The course is intended for students with a deep interest in war, terrorism and journalism, including both news consumers and aspiring practitioners. It aims to promote skepticism of official narratives and critical thinking about journalism itself.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
JOUR3019S001 001/10584 Summer Subterm A Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Christopher Chivers
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Political Reporting: On the Campaign Trail
JOUR3101S001 3 points.

Political journalism--from the campaign trail to the halls of Congress--has played a vital and important role over the last four years. This course will offer an overview and critical examination of political journalism and the interaction of media with the White House, Congress, campaigns and statehouses. It will explore how technology and polarization have changed coverage of politics, as well as ethical considerations, shifting newsroom expectations and the challenges facing journalists as they cover campaigns and American political institutions.

The course is intended for students with a deep interest politics and journalism, including both news consumers and aspiring practitioners. It aims to both provide practical training and promote critical thinking about political journalism itself. The focus will be largely on print journalism, though radio and television work will be briefly explored along with opinion writing. This will be a writing intensive class with a focus on practical skills. Workshopping of written articles will be required and there will be in-class writing and reporting exercises. Students will both examine their own biases and meet with leading practioners of the craft. 

The course is led by New York Times political reporter Lisa Lerer.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
JOUR3101S001 001/10595 Summer Subterm A We 05:30 PM–08:40 PM
Mo 05:30 PM–08:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Journalism in an Age of Activism
JOUR3102S001 3 points.

Social and political change can be powered by protest and coordinated acts of civil dissent. In modern American life, it is easier than ever to share information and rally supporters to a cause, but the propulsive force of protest movements happens in the streets. In an age when lies and conspiracy theories can outpace the truth and protesters, counter protesters, and law enforcement all view the press with skepticism, how can journalists verify, interrogate, and report on what is happening while also remaining safe and keeping their sources safe? What does it mean to report on a protest objectively? And should that even be a goal? 

This course offers an overview and critical examination of journalistic coverage of protest and civil dissent over the last sixty years. It explores specific selections of protest reporting in a range of media formats, including photography and video journalism, audio news, investigative longform, and personal essays, as well as considers the ethical considerations, risks, and challenges that journalists navigate as they cover individual protests and protest movements writ large.  

Over the course of the semester, students will learn the fundamentals of modern journalistic practice as well as analyze the origins and purposes of protest reporting. We will examine the challenges the practice of civil dissent journalism faces in the present day and discuss how journalism shapes public discourse around activism, protests, and other forms of political dissent.

The course is intended for students with a deep interest in activism, civil dissent, political unrest, and journalism, including both news consumers and aspiring practitioners of the craft. It aims to promote skepticism of official narratives and improve critical thinking about how protest movements are covered by journalists.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
JOUR3102S001 001/10585 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Christopher Sanders
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only