Summer Sessions | Courses | Political Science

Political Science

The Political Science Department offers a variety of courses that focus on four major areas of study: American politics, comparative politics, political theory, and international relations studies.

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information.

Summer 2022 Session Information

  • SESSION A (First Half Term) courses are May 23–July 1, 2022
  • SESSION B (Second Half Term) courses are July 5–August 12, 2022
  • SESSION X (Full Term) courses are May 23–August 12, 2022
Courses
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POLITICAL THEORY I
POLS1101S001 4 points.
What is a just society? What is a good life? How should we live together when we disagree about justice and the good life? Is government essential to living well? What is the best form of government? What rights do we have? How, if at all, can the coercive power of the state be justified? These are some of the enduring questions we will explore. A major goal of the course is to exercise techniques needed to understand a political thinker’s arguments and to construct one’s own.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS1101S001 001/10244 Session A Mo 04:30 PM–07:30 PM
We 04:30 PM–07:30 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michelle Chun
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
POLITICAL THEORY I-DISC
POLS1111S001 0 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS1111S001 001/10245 Session A Mo 07:40 PM–08:30 PM
We 07:40 PM–08:30 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Rebecca Marwege
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTRO TO AMER GOVT & POLITICS
POLS1201S001 4 points.
Introduction to national political institutions and processes. The presidency, Congress, the courts, political parties and elections, interest groups, and public opinion.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS1201S001 001/10246 Session A Mo 04:30 PM–07:40 PM
We 04:30 PM–07:40 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Miller
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTRO AMER GOVT&POL-DISCUSSION
POLS1211S001 0 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS1211S001 001/10247 Session A Mo 07:40 PM–08:30 PM
We 07:40 PM–08:30 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gustavo Novoa
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTRO TO INT'L RELATIONS
POLS1601S001 4 points.
A survey of major concepts and issues in international relations. Issues include anarchy, power, foreign policy decision-making, domestic politics and foreign policy, theories of cooperation and conflict, international security and arms control, nationalism, international law and organizations, and international economic relations.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS1601S001 001/10248 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Urte Peteris
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
INTRO TO INT'L RELATIONS-DISC
POLS1611S001 0 points.
This is the required discussion section for POLS UN1601.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS1611S001 001/10249 Session A Tu 04:10 PM–05:00 PM
Th 04:10 PM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Valerie Reynoso
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
JUSTICE
POLS3100W001 3 points.

An inquiry into the nature and implications of justice in areas ranging from criminal justice to social justice to the circumstances of war and peace, considering issues such as abortion, the criminalization of behavior, the death penalty, climate change, global poverty, civil disobedience, and international conflict.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3100W001 001/10250 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Luke MacInnis
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
POLS3228S001 3 points.

This course is an introduction to American constitutional law. We examine key historical debates surrounding the constitution’s framing, ratification, and subsequent amendments, and study several major court decisions that have elaborated the constitution’s meaning over time. We will explore competing theories of how the constitution should be interpreted, how the constitution distributes and limits the power of different branches of government, and which fundamental political and civil rights the constitution guarantees (see the schedule of readings for specific topics). Students will regularly discuss, debate, and write about these issues.

A major learning goal of the course is to practice the skills needed to understand a legal argument and to articulate our own. Students will learn how to identify the different elements of a legal opinion, how to formulate a legal opinion, and how to conduct basic legal research.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3228S001 001/10367 Session B Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Luke MacInnis
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
AMERICAN URBAN POLITICS
POLS3232S001 4 points.

This urban politics course examines the evolving intergovernmental structure of political power in and relative to American cities. It includes factors that range from globalization to national and state policies and politics, down through the local level where - to misquote former Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill - “all politics used to be local.“ It focuses on the context and drivers of local government politics, structures, and decision-making frameworks and on the evolution of cities’ patterns of relationships with state and national governments. Themes include power and decision-making, the leadership and administration of cities, present day problems and strategies to deal with them, the historical origins of urban politics, past federal and state policies toward cities and the contemporary consequences of these patterns. The survivability of the city in the face of contemporary overlapping crises will be addressed. Among other topics, students can expect to focus on urban political economy, political machines and urban reform, immigration, race and ethnicity in urban politics, regional efforts to contend with economic development and crisis, federal laws and policies that have shaped today’s urban environment, the day to day administration of cities, and urban problems such as fiscal strain, poverty, the burden of growth and attracting economic investment, the costs and consequences of urban terror, disaster, extreme political lability, and the evolving global city.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3232S001 001/10303 Session B Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Judith Russell
4 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
AMERICAN URBAN POLITICS-DISC
POLS3233S001 0 points.

This is the required discussion section for POLS S3233.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3233S001 001/10304 Session B Mo 04:10 PM–05:00 PM
We 04:10 PM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ashwin Dubey
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ADVANCES IN IPE
POLS3628S001 4 points.

This course examines questions in international political economy, asking what we know and how we know it. It addresses questions such as: Why do some countries promote globalization while others resist it? What do IOs do in international politics? Who runs our system of global governance? We will explore these questions and others by focusing on topics such as international trade, foreign aid, investment, and the environment. For each topic, we will use a variety of theoretical lenses and then investigate the evidence in favor of each. More generally, the course will consider the challenges of drawing casual inferences in the field of international political economy. There are no prerequisites for this course but an introductory economy course would be helpful. Students will write a short reading response each week and produce a research proposal for studying a topic related to international political economy, though they do not need to actually conduct this research. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3628S001 001/10305 Session A Tu 01:00 PM–04:00 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Davit Sahakyan
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
ADVANCES IN IPE-DISC
POLS3629S001 0 points.

This is the required discussion section for POLS S3628.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3629S001 001/10306 Session A Tu 04:10 PM–05:00 PM
Th 04:10 PM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Manu Singh
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
CHINA'S FOREIGN RELATIONS
POLS3671W001 3 points.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the foreign relations of the People’s Republic of China from 1949 to the present. The course looks at the world from China’s point of view and is organized geographically, moving from China’s homeland to its borderlands and continents and sea lanes beyond Asia. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3671W001 001/10253 Session B Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Beckley
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill Wait List)
In-Person
Data Science for Politics
POLS3730X001 3 points.

This course explores techniques to harness the power of ``big data'' to answer questions related to political science and/or American politics. Students will learn how to use R---a popular open-source programming language---to obtain, clean, analyze, and visualize data. No previous knowledge of R is required.

We will focus on applied problems using real data wherever possible, using R's ``Tidyverse.'' In total, in this course we will cover concepts such as reading data in various formats (including ``cracking'' atypical government data sources and pdf documents); web scraping; data joins; data manipulation and cleaning (including string variables and regular expressions); data mining; making effective data visualizations; using data to make informed prediction, and basic text analysis. We will also cover programming basics including writing functions and loops in R. Finally, we will discuss how to use R Markdown to communicate our results effectively to outside audiences. Class sessions are applied in nature, and our exercises are designed around practical problems: Predicting election outcomes, determining the author of anonymous texts, and cleaning up messy government data so we can use it. 

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS3730X001 001/00012 Session B Mo 05:30 PM–08:10 PM
We 05:30 PM–08:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Miller
3 Closed for Online Registration
(no Adds or Drops)
GLOBAL ENERGY: SECURITY/GEOPOL
POLS4811S001 3 points.
The course focuses on the nexus between energy and security as it reveals in the policies and interaction of leading energy producers and consumers. Topics include: hydrocarbons and search for stability and security in the Persian Gulf, Caspian basin, Eurasia, Africa and Latin America; Russia as a global energy player; role of natural gas in the world energy balance and European energy security; transformation of the global energy governance structure; role and evolution of the OPEC; introduction into energy economics; dynamics and fundamentals of the global energy markets; IOCs vs NOCs; resource nationalism, cartels, sanctions and embargoes; Asia's growing energy needs and its geo-economic and strategic implications; nuclear energy and challenges to non-proliferation regime; alternative and renewable sources of energy; climate change and attempts of environmental regulation; emerging international carbon regimes and search for optimal models of sustainable development. Special focus on implications of the shale revolution and technological innovations on U.S. energy security.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS4811S001 001/10251 Session A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Albert Bininachvili
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person
STRAT INTELLIGNC/POL DEC MAKNG
POLS4832S001 3 points.

The interaction of intelligence and political decision-making in the U.S. other Western democracies, Russia and China. Peculiarities of intelligence in the Middle East (Israel, Iran, Pakistan). Intelligence analyzed both as a governmental institution and as a form of activity, with an emphasis on complex relations within the triangle of intelligence communities, national security organizations, and high-level political leadership. Stages and disciplines of intelligence process. Intelligence products and political decision-making. The function of intelligence considered against the backdrop of rapid evolution of information technologies, changing meaning of homeland security, and globalization. Particular emphasis on the role of intelligence in the prevention of terrorism and WMD proliferation.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
POLS4832S001 001/10252 Session B Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Albert Bininachvili
3 Registration Block
(no Adds)
(self-man. Wait List)
In-Person