Summer Sessions | Courses | Religion

Course information is posted for 2021. Please check back at a later time for updated 2022 course offerings.

Religion

The Religion Department is committed to the rigorous exploration of the growth and development of religious traditions, their historical and contemporary influence in shaping cultures and societies, and their wide-ranging roles in shaping changing global contexts.

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021
Courses
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Religion and the History of Hip Hop
RELI1612W001 4 points.

This is an undergraduate lecture course introducing students to the study of religion through an engagement with the history of hip hop music. More specifically, this course is organized chronologically to narrate a history of religion in the United States (circa 1970 to the present day) by mapping the ways that a variety of religious ideas and practices have animated rap music’s evolution and expansion during this time period. While there are no required prerequisites for the course, prior coursework in religious studies, African American studies, and/or popular music is helpful.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI1612W001 001/11058 Summer B Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Josef Sorett
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Religion and the History of Hip Hop - Discussion
RELI1613W001 0 points.

This is an undergraduate lecture course introducing students to the study of religion through an engagement with the history of hip hop music. More specifically, this course is organized chronologically to narrate a history of religion in the United States (circa 1970 to the present day) by mapping the ways that a variety of religious ideas and practices have animated rap music’s evolution and expansion during this time period. While there are no required prerequisites for the course, prior coursework in religious studies, African American studies, and/or popular music is helpful.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI1613W001 001/11059 Summer B Subterm Mo 04:10 PM–05:00 PM
We 04:10 PM–05:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Josef Sorett
0 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
ISLAM
RELI2305S001 4 points.

This course is designed as an introduction to the Islamic religion, both in its pre-modern and modern manifestations. The semester begins with a survey of the central elements that unite a diverse community of Muslim peoples from a variety of geographical and cultural backgrounds. This includes a look at the Prophet and the Qur'an and the ways in which both were actualized in the development of ritual, jurisprudence, theology, and sufism/mysticism. The course then shifts to the modern period, examining the impact of colonization and the rise of liberal secularism on the Muslim world. The tension between traditional Sunni and Shi'i systems of authority and movements for 'modernization' and/or 'reform' feature prominently in these readings. Topics range from intellectual attempts at societal/religious reform (e.g. Islamic Revivalism, Modernism, Progressivism) and political re-interpretations of traditional Islamic motifs (e.g. Third-Worldism and Jihadist discourse) to efforts at accommodating scientific and technological innovations (e.g. evolution, bioethics ). The class ends by examining the efforts of American and European Muslim communities to carve out distinct spheres of identity in the larger global Muslim community ( umma) through expressions of popular culture (e.g. Hip-Hop).

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI2305S001 001/11060 Summer A Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Najam Haider
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
ISLAM
RELI2305S002 4 points.

This course is designed as an introduction to the Islamic religion, both in its pre-modern and modern manifestations. The semester begins with a survey of the central elements that unite a diverse community of Muslim peoples from a variety of geographical and cultural backgrounds. This includes a look at the Prophet and the Qur'an and the ways in which both were actualized in the development of ritual, jurisprudence, theology, and sufism/mysticism. The course then shifts to the modern period, examining the impact of colonization and the rise of liberal secularism on the Muslim world. The tension between traditional Sunni and Shi'i systems of authority and movements for 'modernization' and/or 'reform' feature prominently in these readings. Topics range from intellectual attempts at societal/religious reform (e.g. Islamic Revivalism, Modernism, Progressivism) and political re-interpretations of traditional Islamic motifs (e.g. Third-Worldism and Jihadist discourse) to efforts at accommodating scientific and technological innovations (e.g. evolution, bioethics ). The class ends by examining the efforts of American and European Muslim communities to carve out distinct spheres of identity in the larger global Muslim community ( umma) through expressions of popular culture (e.g. Hip-Hop).

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI2305S002 002/11061 Summer B Subterm Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Najam Haider
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
EAST ASIAN BUDDHISM
RELI2308S001 4 points.
Lecture and discussion. An introductory survey that studies East Asian Buddhism as an integral , living religious tradition. Emphasis on the reading of original treatises and historiographies in translation, while historical events are discussed in terms of their relevance to contemporary problems confronted by Buddhism. Global Core.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI2308S001 001/11062 Summer B Subterm We 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Th 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Tu 09:00 AM–10:35 AM
Mo 09:00 AM–10:35 AM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Michael Como
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
Hybrid
African and North African Philosophy: An Introduction
RELI4214W001 3 points.

What is African philosophy? Is a theory African simply because it is rooted in the political present of the continent? Is it African because it corresponds to an African cultural singularity or simply because his authors and inventors come from or live in Africa? This class will examine a) how religious traditions shape African theory b) how the influence of colonial anthropology on concepts of African culture and tradition can be challenged c) how African theory relates to African politics of decolonization, in North and ‘‘subsaharan’’ Africa. The major dialectical problem we will examine during the class is the ongoing contradiction between claims of authenticity and demands of liberation, traditionalism and modernity, religion and secularism, culturalism and Marxism.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI4214W001 001/12747 Summer B Subterm Mo 02:10 PM–04:00 PM
We 02:10 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Mohamed Ait Amer Meziane
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Living Together: North American (Religious) Experiments
RELI4407W001 3 points.

The purpose of this seminar is to study historical communal religious experiments in the United States. It will engage with the questions of religious counter-cultures, and in particular the ways that communal religious groups challenge mainstream economic, political, gender, racial, and sexual norms through fashioning alternative modes of living together. The seminar will concentrate on study and analysis of texts, practices, and materials from two religious groups, the Shakers and Father Divine’s International Peace Mission.  The questions raised in considering these two historical groups will be refocused in a final unit that compares these communities to the comparatively short lived and “secular” Occupy movement, and brings the issues and challenges of alternative forms of living into the present moment.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI4407W001 001/12756 Summer A Subterm Th 02:10 PM–04:00 PM
Tu 02:10 PM–04:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Courtney Bender
3 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only
CRIME/PUNISHMENT-JEWISH CULTRE
RELI4509W001 4 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI4509W001 001/00103 Summer A Subterm Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Beth Berkowitz
4 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
READING (IN THEORY)
RELI4626W001 4 points.

This reading-intensive course will engage, over time with essential texts of the current critical canon. Offered over a series of semesters, it is aimed at developing a practice of reading: close or distant, and always attentive. Let us say: slow reading. What does it mean to read? Where and when does reading start? Where does it founder? What does reading this author (Freud, for example) or that author (say, Foucault) do to the practice of reading? Can we read without misreading? Can we read for content or information without missing the essential? Is there such a thing as essential reading? Favoring a demanding and strenuous exposure to the text at hand, this course promises just that: a demanding and strenuous exposure to reading. The course can be repeated for credit.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RELI4626W001 001/11232 Summer A Subterm Tu 10:10 AM–12:00 PM
Th 10:10 AM–12:00 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Gil Anidjar
4 Closed for Online Registration On-Line Only