Summer Sessions | Courses | Slavic Languages and Literature

Slavic Languages and Literature

Language courses provide an opportunity to students who may wish to accelerate their study of Russian, Russian literature, and Russian culture and cinema.

Check the Directory of Classes for the most up-to-date course information in Ukrainian, Russian, Comparative Literature: Russian, Georgian, Linguistics, and Czech.

Summer 2021 Session Information

  • SESSION A courses are May 3–June 18, 2021
  • SESSION B courses are June 28–August 16, 2021

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To apply, follow the Summer Sessions application instructions for your admissions category:

Courses
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Poets, Rebels, Exiles: 100 Years of Russians and Rusian Jews in America
CLRS4037W001 3 points.
Poets, Rebels, Exiles examines the successive generations of the most provocative and influential Russian and Russian Jewish writers and artists who brought the cataclysm of the Soviet and post-Soviet century to North America. From Joseph Brodsky—the bad boy bard of Soviet Russia and a protégé of Anna Akhmatova, who served 18 months of hard labor near the North Pole for social parasitism before being exiled—to the most recent artistic descendants, this course will interrogate diaspora, memory, and nostalgia in the cultural production of immigrants and exiles.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
CLRS4037W001 001/10228 Summer Subterm A Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Anna Katsnelson
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
CLT HERITAGE: A GEOR CASE STUDY
GEOR4042W001 3 points.
This seminar brings anthropological perspectives to bear on the practices and ideologies of cultural heritage in the Republic of Georgia today, whee culture has proven a key political and economic pawn in a context of ongoing postsocialist struggle.......
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
GEOR4042W001 001/10243 Summer Subterm A Tu 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
We 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
Th 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–02:35 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Lauren Ninoshvili
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
Endangered Languages in the Global City: Lang, Culture, and Migration in Contempary NYC
LING3102W001 3 points.
Of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages – representing migrations and historical developments thousands of years old – the majority are oral, little-documented, and increasingly endangered under the onslaught of global languages like English. This course will take the unprecedented, paradoxical linguistic capital of New York City as a lens for examining how immigrants form communities in a new land, how those communities are integrated into the wider society, and how they grapple with linguistic and cultural loss. Interdisciplinary with an experiential learning component, the course will focus on texts, materials, encounters, and fieldwork with three of the city’s newest and least-studied indigenous immigrant communities (indigenous Latin Americans, Himalayans, and Central Asians).Indigeneity, though often invisible or perceived as marginal in global cities like New York, is in fact pervasive and fundamental. Cities now constitute a crucial site for understanding migration and cultural change, with language a vehicle for culture. Studying cultures only in situ (i.e. in their homelands) risks missing a crucial dimension. Students will be immersed in stateless, oral, immigrant cultures while also gaining a hands-on critical understanding of language endangerment and urban sociolinguistic research, first through field experiences and guest speakers (Endangered Language Alliance partners) and then by going out together into communities to work on projects in small teams. The Endangered Language Alliance (ELA), where the instructor is Co-Director, was formed as a non-profit research institute in 2010 as a forum for researchers, community members, activists, artists, and other New Yorkers to come together to support indigenous and minority languages. ELA’s video recordings provide first-hand testimony of endangered languages in the global city – in indigenous languages with English translation – available in few other places. Those texts will be central to this course, supplemented by the new,first-ever, detailed language map of New York City being produced by ELA.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LING3102W001 001/10273 Summer Subterm A Tu 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Th 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ross Perlin
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
DISCOURSE ANALYSIS
LING4190W001 3 points.

Prerequisites: LING UN3101 How discourse works; how language is used: oral vs. written modes of language; the structure of discourse; speech acts and speech genres; the expression of power; authenticity; and solidarity in discourse, dialogicity, pragmatics, and mimesis.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LING4190W001 001/10870 Summer Subterm A We 09:00 AM–12:10 PM
Mo 09:00 AM–12:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
John Wright
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
LANGUAGE & SOCIETY
LING4800W001 3 points.
How language structure and usage varies according to societal factors such as social history and socioeconomic factors, illustrated with study modules on language contact, language standardization and literacy, quantitative sociolinguistic theory, language allegiance, language, and power.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
LING4800W001 001/10274 Summer Subterm A Mo 02:40 PM–04:15 PM
Tu 02:40 PM–04:15 PM
We 02:40 PM–04:15 PM
Th 02:40 PM–04:15 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
William Foley
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
LIT & REVOLUTION (20TH C LIT)
RUSS3221V001 3 points.

The revolutionary period (1905-1938) in Russia was not only one of extreme social upheaval but also of exceptional creativity. Established ideas about individuality and collectivity, about how to depict reality, about language, gender, authority, and violence, were all thrown open to radical questioning. Out of this chaos came ideas about literature and film (just for example) which have shaped Western thought on these subjects to this day. In this course we will study a variety of media and genres (poetry, manifestos, film, painting, photomontage, the novel, theoretical essays) in an effort to gain a deep understanding of this complex and fascinating period in Russian cultural history.

Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RUSS3221V001 001/10302 Summer Subterm A We 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Jessica Merrill
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
LITERARY TRANSLATION
RUSS4910G001 3 points.
Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent. Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
RUSS4910G001 001/10303 Summer Subterm B Th 01:00 PM–04:10 PM
Tu 01:00 PM–04:10 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Ronald Meyer
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only
FIN DE SIECLE UKRAINIAN LIT
UKRN4033W001 3 points.
Course Number Section/Call Number Session Times/Location
UKRN4033W001 001/10311 Summer Subterm A Tu 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
We 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
Mo 01:00 PM–02:35 PM
Th 01:00 PM–02:35 PM

Instructor Points Enrollment Method of Instruction
Mark Andryczyk
3 Open for Enrollment
(auto-fill waitlist)
On-Line Only